1,477 research outputs found

    Learner Activities Evaluation Model: A Neuro-Fuzzy Approach

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    Relating non-local quantum computation to information theoretic cryptography

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    Non-local quantum computation (NLQC) is a cheating strategy for position-verification schemes, and has appeared in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence. Here, we connect NLQC to the wider context of information theoretic cryptography by relating it to a number of other cryptographic primitives. We show one special case of NLQC, known as ff-routing, is equivalent to the quantum analogue of the conditional disclosure of secrets (CDS) primitive, where by equivalent we mean that a protocol for one task gives a protocol for the other with only small overhead in resource costs. We further consider another special case of position verification, which we call coherent function evaluation (CFE), and show CFE protocols induce similarly efficient protocols for the private simultaneous message passing (PSM) scenario. By relating position-verification to these cryptographic primitives, a number of results in the cryptography literature give new implications for NLQC, and vice versa. These include the first sub-exponential upper bounds on the worst case cost of ff-routing of 2O(nlogn)2^{O(\sqrt{n\log n})} entanglement, the first example of an efficient ff-routing strategy for a problem believed to be outside P/polyP/poly, linear lower bounds on entanglement for CDS in the quantum setting, linear lower bounds on communication cost of CFE, and efficient protocols for CDS in the quantum setting for functions that can be computed with quantum circuits of low TT depth

    Europe’s Role for Security in a Multipolar World: Views from India and China

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    The Third NFG Academic Council Meeting was held in New Delhi, India, on 26-27 September, 2013 in association with Jawaharlal Nehru University, the Observer Research Foundation, and the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung India. The Conference on ‘Europe’s Role for Security in a Multipolar World: the Views from India and China’ brought together academics, practitioners, and policy makers from Europe, India and China, with the aim of bridging the gap between academic and policy debates in Asia and Europe

    Asian Views of the European Union as a Security Actor: perspectives from China and India

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    The second NFG Academic Council Meeting was held at Peking University, Beijing on 20-21 September, 2012 in cooperation with the School of International Studies, Peking University, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and Chinese Association for European Studies (CAES). The conference theme was 'Asian Views of the European Union as a Security Actor: Perspectives from India and China' and saw participants from Europe, India, China and the US

    A reference specimen for compaction tests of fiber reinforcements

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    Compaction behavior of textiles has a major influence on the outcome of various manufacturing processes for fiber reinforced polymer composites. Nevertheless, no standard exists up to date which specifies test methods or test rigs. A recent international benchmark revealed high variation associated with the result data. This work is a very first step towards a reference specimen, allowing for an isolated view on variations attributed to the test rig mechanics. A specimen design is proposed, intended to show compaction characteristics similar to technical textiles in terms of transverse compaction pressure and corresponding displacement. The reference specimen was tested in a round-robin study comprising test rigs at four different European research institutions. While reproducibility of the compaction behavior on each of the test rigs was high, clear variations between the results gained with different test rigs were observed

    Recovery of erectile function comparing autologous nerve grafts, unseeded conduits, Schwann-cell-seeded guidance tubes and GDNF-overexpressing Schwann cell grafts

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    Dissection of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer eliminates spontaneous erections. Using the rat as an experimental model, we compared the regenerative capacity of autologous nerve grafts and Schwann-cell-seeded nerve guides. After bilateral excision of cavernous nerve segments, cavernous nerves were reconstructed using unseeded silicon tubes, nerve autografts and silicon tubes seeded with either Glial-cell-line-derived (GDNF)-overexpressing or green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Schwann cells (SCs) (16 study nerves per group). Control groups underwent either a sham operation or bilateral excision of cavernous nerve segments without repair. After 12 weeks erectile function was assessed by neurostimulation and intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurement. The reconstructed nerve segments were excised and histologically analyzed. We demonstrated an intact erectile response upon neurostimulation in 25%(4/16) of autologous nerve grafts, in 50% (8/16) of unseeded tubes, in 75% (12/16) of the Schwann-cell-GFP group and in 93.75% (15/16) of the GDNF group. ICP was significantly increased when comparing the Schwann-cell-GFP group with nerve autografts, unseeded conduits and negative controls (P < 0.005). In conclusion, Schwann-cell-seeded scaffolds combined with neurotrophic factors are superior to unseeded tubes and autologous nerve grafts. They present a promising therapeutic approach for the repair of erectile nerve gaps

    Toward Collaborative Cross-Sector Business Models for Sustainability

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    Sustainability challenges typically occur across sectoral boundaries, calling the state, market, andcivil society to action. While consensus exists on the merits of cross-sector collaboration, ourunderstanding of whether and how it can create value for various, collaborating stakeholders is still limited. This Special Issue focuses on how new combined knowledge on cross-sector collaboration and business models for sustainability can inform the academic and practitioner debates about sustainability challenges and solutions. We discuss how cross-sector collaboration can play an important role for the transition to new and potentially sustainability-driving business models given that value creation, delivery and capture of organizations are intimately related to the collaborative ties with their stakeholders. Sustainable alternatives to conventional business models tend to adopt a more holistic perspective of business by broadening the spectrum of solutions and stakeholders and, when aligned with cross-sector collaboration, can contribute new ways of addressing the wicked sustainability problems humanity faces
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