25 research outputs found

    Supersonic aeroelastic instability results for a NASP-like wing model

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    An experimental study and an analytical study have been conducted to examine static divergence for hypersonic-vehicle wing models at supersonic conditions. A supersonic test in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facility was conducted for two wind-tunnel models. These models were nearly identical with the exception of airfoil shape. One model had a four-percent maximum thickness airfoil and the other model had an eight-percent maximum thickness airfoil. The wing models had low-aspect ratios and highly swept leading edges. The all-movable wing models were supported by a single-pivot mechanism along the wing root. For both of the wind-tunnel models, configuration changes could be made in the wing-pivot location along the wing root and in the wing-pivot pitch stiffness. Three divergence conditions were measured for the four-percent thick airfoil model in the Mach number range of 2.6 to 3.6 and one divergence condition was measured for the eight-percent thick airfoil model at a Mach number of 2.9. Analytical divergence calculations were made for comparison with experimental results and to evaluate the parametric effects of wing-pivot stiffness, wing-pivot location, and airfoil thickness variations. These analyses showed that decreasing airfoil thickness, moving the wing-pivot location upstream, or increasing the pitch-pivot stiffness have the beneficial effect of increasing the divergence dynamic pressures. The calculations predicted the trend of experimental divergence dynamic pressure with Mach number accurately; however, the calculations were approximately 25 percent conservative with respect to dynamic pressure

    Overview of the Space Launch System Transonic Buffet Environment Test Program

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    Fluctuating aerodynamic loads are a significant concern for the structural design of a launch vehicle, particularly while traversing the transonic flight environment. At these trajectory conditions, unsteady aerodynamic pressures can excite the vehicle dynamic modes of vibration and result in high structural bending moments and vibratory environments. To ensure that vehicle structural components and subsystems possess adequate strength, stress, and fatigue margins in the presence of buffet and other environments, buffet forcing functions are required to conduct the coupled load analysis of the launch vehicle. The accepted method to obtain these buffet forcing functions is to perform wind-tunnel testing of a rigid model that is heavily instrumented with unsteady pressure transducers designed to measure the buffet environment within the desired frequency range. Two wind-tunnel tests of a 3 percent scale rigid buffet model have been conducted at the Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) buffet test program. The SLS buffet models have been instrumented with as many as 472 unsteady pressure transducers to resolve the buffet forcing functions of this multi-body configuration through integration of the individual pressure time histories. This paper will discuss test program development, instrumentation, data acquisition, test implementation, data analysis techniques, and several methods explored to mitigate high buffet environment encountered during the test program. Preliminary buffet environments will be presented and compared using normalized sectional buffet forcing function root-meansquared levels along the vehicle centerline

    An Overview of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model Program

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    A summary of computational and experimental aeroelastic (AE) and aeroservoelastic (ASE) results for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model is presented. A broad range of analyses and multiple AE and ASE wind-tunnel tests of the S4T wind-tunnel model have been performed in support of the ASE element in the Supersonics Program, part of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. This paper is intended to be an overview of multiple papers that comprise a special S4T technical session. Along those lines, a brief description of the design and hardware of the S4T wind-tunnel model will be presented. Computational results presented include linear and nonlinear aeroelastic analyses, and rapid aeroelastic analyses using CFD-based reduced-order models (ROMs). A brief survey of some of the experimental results from two open-loop and two closed-loop wind-tunnel tests performed at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) will be presented as well

    An Overview of Preliminary Computational and Experimental Results for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

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    A summary of computational and experimental aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic (ASE) results for the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model is presented. A broad range of analyses and multiple ASE wind-tunnel tests of the S4T have been performed in support of the ASE element in the Supersonics Program, part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The computational results to be presented include linear aeroelastic and ASE analyses, nonlinear aeroelastic analyses using an aeroelastic CFD code, and rapid aeroelastic analyses using CFD-based reduced-order models (ROMs). Experimental results from two closed-loop wind-tunnel tests performed at NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) will be presented as well

    Plans and Status of Wind-Tunnel Testing Employing an Aeroservoelastic Semispan Model

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    This paper presents the research objectives, summarizes the pre-wind-tunnel-test experimental results to date, summarizes the analytical predictions to date, and outlines the wind-tunnel-test plans for an aeroservoelastic semispan wind-tunnel model. The model is referred to as the Supersonic Semispan Transport (S4T) Active Controls Testbed (ACT) and is based on a supersonic cruise configuration. The model has three hydraulically-actuated surfaces (all-movable horizontal tail, all-movable ride control vane, and aileron) for active controls. The model is instrumented with accelerometers, unsteady pressure transducers, and strain gages and will be mounted on a 5-component sidewall balance. The model will be tested twice in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The first entry will be an "open-loop" model-characterization test; the second entry will be a "closed-loop" test during which active flutter suppression, gust load alleviation and ride quality control experiments will be conducted

    Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

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    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models

    Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (4th edition)

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    Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (4th edition)1.