6 research outputs found

    Accountability, Assessment, and the Literacies of Information and Communication Technologies

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    In this article, we have explored the issues that Ministries of Education confront in their large‐scale assessment policies and practices as literacy curricula expand to include the new literacies of information and communication technologies. Based on a series of interviews with Ministry personnel, we have described their current progress to include the new literacies, plans for the future, and the dilemmas and challenges in considering the demands of new times. We argue for a more balanced approach to assessment and accountability, one that recognizes the limitations of current public accountability measures and situates them within a broader assessment framework. Key words: large scale assessment, Canadian assessment practices, policy, testing, new literacies Dans cet article, les auteures Ă©tudient les enjeux auxquels sont confrontĂ©s les ministĂšres de l’Éducation dans leurs politiques et mĂ©thodes en matiĂšre d’épreuves communes au fil de l’intĂ©gration des technologies de l’information et de la communication au sein des programmes de litĂ©ratie. À partir d’une sĂ©rie d’entrevues rĂ©alisĂ©es auprĂšs de fonctionnaires de ces ministĂšres, les auteures font le point sur l’inclusion des nouvelles littĂ©raties, la planification du dĂ©veloppement envisagĂ©, les dilemmes et les dĂ©fis qu’impliquent les exigences actuelles. Elles prĂ©conisent une approche plus Ă©quilibrĂ©e de l’évaluation et de l’imputabilitĂ©, laquelle tiendrait compte des limites des mĂ©canismes d’imputabilitĂ© actuels et les situerait dans un cadre d’évaluation plus vaste. Mots clĂ©s : tests communs, mĂ©thodes d’évaluation canadiennes, politiques, nouvelles littĂ©raties.

    FIRST GRADERS’ PREFERENCES FOR NARRATIVE AND/OR INFORMATION BOOKS AND PERCEPTIONS OF OTHER BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ BOOK PREFERENCES

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    In this article, we report on grade‐one children’s preferences for narrative and/or information books, and their perceptions of what boys and girls like to read. Data include responses on two book preference tasks by 40 children in four schools. Children chose books and explained the reasons for their choices. One task was a closed, force‐choice task, the other, an open‐ended task. Boys and girls had similar interests, either preferring stories or liking information books and stories to the same degree. Yet boys and girls perceived that boys prefer information texts and girls prefer narratives. The children’s perceptions reflect gendered stereotypes. Key words: literacy, reading, motivation, genre, gender Dans cet article, les auteurs signalent que les Ă©lĂšves de 1re annĂ©e prĂ©fĂšrent les livres qui racontent des histoires ou donnent de l’information et prĂ©sentent ce que, selon de ces Ă©lĂšves, les garçons et les filles aiment lire. Les donnĂ©es comprennent les rĂ©ponses de 40 enfants dans quatre Ă©coles Ă  deux questionnaires, l’un Ă  rĂ©ponses libres et l’autre Ă  choix multiples, sur les prĂ©fĂ©rences en matiĂšre de livres. Les enfants ont choisi des livres et donnĂ© les raisons de leur choix. Les garçons et les filles avaient des intĂ©rĂȘts similaires, prĂ©fĂ©rant soit les histoires, soit les livres d’information et les histoires au mĂȘme degrĂ©. Et pourtant, les garçons comme les filles avaient l’impression que les garçons aimaient mieux les livres d’information et les filles, les histoires. Les perceptions des enfants reflĂštent les stĂ©rĂ©otypes marquĂ©s par le sexe. Mots clĂ©s : littĂ©ratie, lecture, motivation, genre

    How Teacher Candidates Employ an Online Portfolio for Professional Development

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    Webcast sponsored by Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Faculty of Education. Margot Filipenko is a Senior Instructor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia and co-coordinator (with Brenda Lamb) of the Problem-Based Learning cohort. Dr. Filipenko teachs courses (graduate and undergraduate) both in literacy and in early childhood education. She is also a faculty member for the M.A. in Children’s Literature program housed in the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS). She is also the Co-chair of the Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable. Dr. Filipenko's research interests include early literacy, the texts and materials of early reading instruction, the relationship between picture books and graphic novels and the cultural aspects of children’s literature.Education, Faculty ofUnreviewedFacult

    The Multi-Purpose E-Portfolio: How Teacher Candidates Employ an Online Portfolio for Professional Development

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    Webcast sponsored by Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Faculty of Education. Margot Filipenko is a Senior Instructor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia and co-coordinator (with Brenda Lamb) of the Problem-Based Learning cohort. Dr. Filipenko teachs courses (graduate and undergraduate) both in literacy and in early childhood education. She is also a faculty member for the M.A. in Children’s Literature program housed in the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS). She is also the Co-chair of the Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable. Dr. Filipenko's research interests include early literacy, the texts and materials of early reading instruction, the relationship between picture books and graphic novels and the cultural aspects of children’s literature.Education, Faculty ofUnreviewedFacult

    Constructing word/world knowledge together : young children’s emerging understandings of/with informational texts

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    Although young children's developing understandings of the concept of story have been thoroughly researched, children's informational literacy development has gone largely unexamined. This descriptive, naturalistic study in an emergent-literacy preschool classroom investigated what young children's talk revealed about their understandings of informational texts and the ways in which their teacher enabled and scaffolded those understandings. Over a 3-month period children's responses were videotaped in five contexts: full and small group readalouds, full and small group activities incorporating informational texts and child-to-child informational text sharing. Other data included observational field notes and an interview with the focus teacher. Data (observational field notes and selective transcriptions or complete transcriptions) were collected on a total of 45 episodes of children engaging with informational texts. From this data set, 19 transcripts (2 full group readalouds, 6 small group readalouds, 5 full group activities incorporating informational texts, 3 small group activities incorporating informational texts, and 3 child-to-child sharing of informational texts) were chosen for coding and in-depth analysis. The other data were used in a supplementary way. Six broad conceptual categories of children's talk emerged from the data analysis: informational text knowledge; world knowledge; representing meaning; building connections; reflective talk, and relational talk. These categories represented the various facets of children's engagement with informational texts and revealed the ways in which these children constructed meaning about and with informational texts. The teacher scaffolded the children's emerging understandings of informational texts by taking the roles of: recruiter (orienting and recruiting the children to the text); director (directing the children's attention to particular features of the text); model (modelling the reading process); elaborator (providing elaborative feedback); connector (making life-to-text and text-to-life connections); provocateur (prodding children to think more deeply about a topic); and conductor (facilitating the day-to-day routines of a classroom community). Individual styles of engagement with informational texts were identified and explored for two of the children. A grounded theory of young children's informational literacy development was developed that proposes: Young children's informational literacy development consists of six aspects: informational text knowledge, world knowledge, representation, reflection, connections and relational talk. During an informational literacy event these six aspects dynamically engage and blur as the child works to construct meaning. Informational literacy development is the dynamic process whereby this engagement results in a transformational moment.Education, Faculty ofLanguage and Literacy Education (LLED), Department ofGraduat

    Storytelling : a classification of the elements identified in the oral storytexts of three- and four-year-old children

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    Although research has probed the linguistic elements of the storytexts produced by children, it appears to have ignored the child's use of the paralinguistic elements of storytelling as a further indicator of the child's developing sense of story. The purpose of this study has been to identify what linguistic and paralinguistic elements are employed by three-and four-year-old children in episodes of spontaneous storytelling. In order to develop a practical structure which adequately described the linguistic and paralinguistic elements embedded in children's oral storytexts, the design of the study has involved the following procedure: collecting spontaneous storytellings from three- and four-year-old children; analysing and describing recurrent linguistic and paralinguistic elements embedded in the data; organizing this information into a classification system that clearly illustrates the linguistic and paralinguistic abilities of three- and four-year-old children. In the process of developing the classification system, the following general observations were made: 1. Three- and four-year-old children use a broad range of linguistic and paralinguistic elements in episodes of spontaneous storytelling. 2. Definite patterns emerged in individual children's storytelling style. Once developed, the classification system was used to identify whether there is a developmental pattern in the acquisition of skill in the linguistic and paralinguistic area and, whether context affects the storytelling ability of three- and four-year-old children. The findings showed 1. There appears to be a developmental pattern in acquisition of skill in the linguistic and paralinguistic area, however, it does not appear to be tightly linked to age. 2. The context in which a child is asked to tell story influences the outcome.Education, Faculty ofLanguage and Literacy Education (LLED), Department ofGraduat
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