23,675 research outputs found

    The Independent Living Movement in the UK

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    [Excerpt] The origin of the Independent Living Movement in the UK go back to the late 1970s. Disabled People in the UK, like many other disabled people in other Countries were very disenchanted by the services being provided for them at this time. Disabled people felt the services were paternalistic, institutional, second class, too medically orientated and out of touch with their real needs As a result of this they looked elsewhere for solutions to overcome their restricted predicament and living conditions. This led to a number of disabled people finding out about Independent Living which consequently led them to visit the USA, researching into their Independent Living Movement in terms of how it started, what it did and how it developed. They felt the concepts, ideas and philosophy of Independent Living were very significant and appropriate, and would be helpful and innovative in the UK and point a way forward for disabled people in the future. During 1980 and 1981 a number of leading and key individual disabled people were able to raise funds so that they could travel to explore looking into the Independent Living possibilities in the USA, particularly in Berkeley California, which is where the first Centre for Independent Living was established. These people included Vic Finkelstein, a radical activist, sociologist and founder of UPIAS, (Union of the Physically Impaired Against Segregation) which was largely responsible for the conception of the social model of disability, Rosalie Wilkins, a TV presenter of a disability programme and disability activist, and John Evans, one of the founders of Project 81, an innovative scheme to help disabled people get out of institutions and at the time living in an institution himself. These 3 were followed by many others in later years. It was not only disabled people from the UK who went to America, looking for answers and inspirations for their situation at this time, as many other European disabled people did so in their quest for Independent Living too

    Factors affecting colour and cloud stability in a wildberry herbal drink : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of M. Tech. in Food Science at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

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    An investigation was undertaken into the stability of the natural colour, from anthocyanins, and cloud in a Wildberry Herbal fruit drink. The fruit drinks consisted of cloudy apple and berry fruit juice with natural herb extracts and flavours. The objectives of the research were to identify the cause of cloud instability and sediment formation in the drink; determine the effect of ascorbic acid, berryfruit juice volume, storage temperature and light on anthocyanin stability; investigate the use of stabilisers to prevent sediment formation and determine consumer acceptability of a modified drink. The cause of sediment formation was determined by analysing the contribution of the major ingredients to the total amount of sediment formed. To minimise the sediment, a range of commercially available polysaccharide stabilisers were added to the drink and the amount of sediment formed determined. A consumer sensory evaluation was undertaken to determine consumer acceptability of drinks in which stabilisers had been added to improve the cloud stability. The factors affecting the anthocyanin's in the drink were analysed using a fractional factorial experimental design. The effect of the commercial pasteurisation process on the colour was also investigated. The formation of sediment was identified as being the result of complexing between the unstable cloud of the cloudy apple juice and polyphenolics, including anthocyanins, in the berryfruit juice. No sediment formed during eight weeks storage when clarified apple juice was substituted for cloudy apple juice. The sediment was reduced by approximately 45% using stabiliser systems consisting of either xanthan or a xanthan/propylene glycol alginate mixture. Consumer sensory evaluation of the modified drinks found no significant difference in liking from the standard drink. The anthocyanin loss in the drink was found to be significantly affected by increased storage temperature. Elderberry juice was found to have better colour stability over blackcurrant juice. Pasteurisation did not initially affect the colour stability of the drink. It was recommended that the composition of the Wildberry Herbal drink remain unchanged. The product should be stored at as low a temperature as possible. The drinks should be cooled to ambient temperature as quickly as possible after the pasteurisation process

    Entry Regulation and the Influence of an Incumbent Special Interest Group

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    The literature on both entry deterrence and the influence of special interest groups is extensive. In this paper we attempt to marry these strands of literature by developing a model of entry deterrence through interest group influence in an entry re-regulation context. In contrast to other entry deterrence models, we are able to investigate how product market rivalry affects the regulator's equilibrium entry decision, firms' output decisions, entry deterring activities and equilibrium welfare. We find that in equilibrium more collusive industries tend to lobby more but that the regulator attempts to compensate for weak price rivalry by allowing greater entry. The latter effect tends to offset the former, possibly entirely so that the overall welfare effect is ambiguous.entry regulation, entry deterrence, incumbent lobby group, Quasi-Cournot conjectural variation.

    Ethics After New Materialism: A Modest Undertaking

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