76 research outputs found

    The Predictive Value of Subjective Labour Supply Data: A Dynamic Panel Data Model with Measurement Error

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    This paper tests the predictive value of subjective labour supply data for adjustments in working hours over time. The idea is that if subjective labour supply data help to predict next year's working hours, such data must contain at least some information on individual labour supply preferences. This informational content can be crucial to identify models of labour supply. Furthermore, it can be crucial to investigate the need for, or, alternatively, the support for laws and collective agreements on working hours flexibility. In this paper I apply dynamic panel data models that allow for measurement error. I find evidence for the predictive power of subjective labour supply data concerning desired working hours in the German Socio-Economic Panel 1988-1996.Labour Supply, Subjective Data, Measurement Error, Dynamic Panel Data Models

    Participation Behavior of East German Women after German Unification

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    The paper studies the determinants of labor force participation by East German women after unification. To isolate the role of preferences on labor force participation from individual characteristics, we develop a panel data model that simultaneously explains participation, employment, and wages. The model, estimated for East and West Germany on the basis of the German Socio-Economic Panel, indicates that distinct preferences could explain the regional difference in participation rates at unification. Afterward East German women became less willing to participate, but the negative participation trend was offset on the aggregate level by changes in characteristics and wages promoting participation.http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39862/3/wp477.pd

    Training Intensity and First Labor Market Outcomes of Apprenticeship Graduates

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    The apprenticeship system is the most important source of formal post-secondary training in Germany. Using German register data - the IAB Employment Sample - we find that apprentices staying with their training firm after graduation have longer first-job durations but not higher wages than apprentices leaving the training firm. Retention rates, first job durations, and post-apprenticeship wages are all increasing functions of training intensity. Some implications for the ongoing debate as to why firms are willing to invest in general training are discussed.Training, wages, job-duration

    A Note on the Redistributive Effect of Immigration

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    In this paper, we study gains and losses that accrue to natives because of immigration. The gain on the aggregated level is called the 'immigration surplus', which can be seen as analogous to a consumer surplus. We derive changes in the earnings of native owners of production factors by employing a stylized model with capital and two types of labour. We claim that the changes in earnings are larger than reported by previous studies, and we propose a new method to tally them up to the immigration surplus.

    Early Retirement and Financial Incentives: Differences Between High and Low Wage Earners

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    This paper investigates the impact of financial incentives on early-retirement behaviour for high and low wage earners. Using a stylized life-cycle model, we derive hypotheses on the behaviour of the two types. We use administrative data and employ two identification strategies to test the predictions. First, we exploit exogenous variation in the replacement rate over birth cohorts of workers who are eligible to a transitional early retirement scheme. Second, we employ a regression discontinuity design by comparing workers who are eligible and non-eligible to the transitional scheme. The empirical results show that low wage earners are, as predicted by the model, more sensitive to financial incentives. The results imply that low wage earners will experience a stronger incentive to continue working in an optimal early retirement scheme.

    Immigration policy and welfare state design; a qualitative approach to explore the interaction

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    For the design of an immigration policy, in terms of the number and skills of the entrants and their effect on the host country, it is important to realize that the kind of welfare state matters. This study confronts three possible labour migration regimes - a temporary, an open and a selective regime - with two possible welfare state settings - a highly redistributive and a hardly redistributive welfare state. By comparing the likely outcomes between the different regimes, and by taking possible effects on the self-selection of immigrants into account, the study draws the following conclusions. First, both labour migration policy and the welfare state matter for the skill composition of labour migrants. Second, to be attractive for high-skilled labour migrants a highly distributive welfare state needs to undo its discouraging effect on these migrants. Third, a highly redistributive welfare state is attractive for low-skilled labour migrants. Because these migrants may become costly for such a welfare state once they manage to stay permanently, one should be careful with the introduction of temporary migration policies for the low-skilled.

    Is Part-time Employment Here To Stay? Evidence from the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992–2005

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    To balance work and family responsibilities, the Netherlands have chosen a unique model that combines a high female employment rate with a high part-time employment rate. The model is likely to be the result of (societal) preferences as the removal of institutional barriers, like lower marginal tax rates for partners and better childcare facilities, has not led to more working hours. It is, however, an open question whether the model is here to stay or whether younger generations of women will choose full-time jobs in the near future. We investigate the development of working hours over successive generations of women using the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992-2005. We find evidence of an increasing propensity to work part-time over the successive generations, and a decreasing propensity to work full-time for the generations born after the early 1950s. Our results are in line with results of studies on social norms and attitudes as they find a similar pattern over the successive generations. It therefore seems likely that without changes in (societal) preferences the part-time employment model is indeed here to stay for some more time.female labour supply, working hours
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