71 research outputs found

    Winter Barley Planting Date and Nitrogen Amendment Trial

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    With the revival of the small grains industry in the Northeast and the strength of the locavore movement, craft breweries and distilleries have expressed an interest in sourcing local barley for malting. Malting barley must meet specific quality characteristics such as low protein content and high germination. Many farmers are also interested in barley as a concentrated, high-energy feed source for livestock. Depending on the variety, barley can be planted in either the spring or fall, and both two- and six-row barley can be used for malting and livestock feed. Winter barley has not been traditionally grown in the Northeast due to severe winterkill. However, newly developed varieties and a changing climate have encouraged our team to investigate this crop for the area. In 2015, we undertook this project in coordination with the University of Massachusetts to evaluate the effects of winter barley planting date and quantity of fall and spring nitrogen amendments on barley yields and quality

    Performance of Green Manure Species Seeded into Spring Barley

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    With the revival of the small grains industry in the Northeast and the strength of the locavore movement, craft breweries and distilleries have expressed an interest in sourcing local barley for malting. Many farmers are also interested in barley as a concentrated, high-energy feed source for livestock. Depending on the variety, barley can be planted in either the spring or fall, and both two- and six-row barley can be used for malting and livestock feed

    Organic Spring Barley Variety Trial

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    With the revival of the small grains industry in the Northeast and the strength of the locavore movement, craft breweries and distilleries have expressed an interest in sourcing local barley for malting. Malting barley must meet specific quality characteristics such as low protein content and high germination. Depending on the variety, barley can be planted in either the spring or fall, and both two- and six-row barley can be used for malting. In 2017, UVM Extension in collaboration with the Eastern Spring Malting Barley Nursery (ESBN) testing network conducted a spring malting barley trial to evaluate yield and quality of 25 varieties

    Organic Winter Wheat Variety Trial

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    In 2016, the University of Vermont Extension Northwest Crops and Soils Program evaluated 14 modern hard red winter wheat varieties to determine which varieties thrive in organic production systems. The trial was established at the Borderview Research Farm in Alburgh, Vermont. Several varieties that did not perform well in previous trial years were eliminated from the 2016 variety trial. Newly released varieties were also sought for evaluation

    Winter Barley Seeding Rate, Cover Crop and Variety Trial

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    With the revival of the small grains industry in the Northeast and the strength of the locavore movement, craft breweries and distilleries have expressed an interest in sourcing local barley for malting. Malting barley must meet specific quality characteristics such as low protein content and high germination. Many farmers are also interested in barley as a concentrated, high-energy feed source for livestock. Depending on the variety, barley can be planted in either the spring or fall, and both two- and six-row barley can be used for malting and livestock feed. Winter barley has not been traditionally grown in the Northeast due to severe winterkill. However, newly developed varieties and a changing climate have encouraged our team to investigate this crop for the area. In 2015, we undertook this project in coordination with the University of Massachusetts to evaluate the effects of winter barley variety, seeding rate, and nitrogen (N) fixing cover crops on barley yields and quality

    Organic Heirloom Winter Wheat Variety Trial

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    Many consumers are interested in heirloom wheat for flavor, perceived health benefits, or its history, while many farmers are interested in heirloom wheat because it may have superior genetics better adapted to the challenging growing conditions in the Northeast. Production of heirloom wheat may also provide a farmer with a value added market with increased returns. This variety trial was established to determine heirloom winter wheat varieties that are suitable for production in Vermont’s growing conditions. This was the fifth year that this trial was conducted in Vermont. These projects were funded through the UNFI Foundation that has set a priority to protect the biodiversity of our seed supply and the stewardship of genetic resources of organic seed

    Oat Variety Trial

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    Oats (Avena sativa L.) have a long history of production in the Northeast. Although most oats are planted for a cover crop or forage, grain oats are a potential revenue source for farmers. According to the 2007 census, about 200 acres of land in Vermont is cultivated for oat grain production, with an average yield of 1747 lbs per acre. With the exception of hull-less varieties, oats need to be de-hulled before being used for human consumption and further processing is required to make oatmeal, steel cut oats, or oat flour. Since 2009, the University of Vermont Extension Program has conducted oat variety trials to provide yield comparisons in Vermont’s climate. Varietal selection is one of the most important aspects of crop production and significantly influences yield potential. It is important to remember, however, that the data presented are from replicated research trials from only one location in Vermont and represent only one season. The goal of this project was to evaluate yields and protein of eleven oat varieties

    Organic Spring Wheat Variety Trial

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    In 2017, the University of Vermont Extension Northwest Crops and Soils Program evaluated twenty-two hard red spring wheat varieties to determine which would thrive in organic production systems in the Northeast. The trial was stablished at the Borderview Research Farm in Alburgh, Vermont. Varieties that did not perform well in previous years were eliminated from the 2017 trial and new varieties were added

    Oat Variety Trial

    Get PDF
    Oats (Avena sativa L.) have a long history of production in the Northeast. Although most oats are planted for a cover crop or forage, grain oats are a potential revenue source for farmers. According to the 2007 census, about 200 acres of land in Vermont is cultivated for oat grain production, with an average yield of 1747 lbs ac-1. With the exception of hull-less varieties, oats need to be de-hulled before being used for human consumption and further processing is required to make oatmeal, steel cut oats, or oat flour. Since 2009, the University of Vermont Extension Program has conducted oat variety trials to provide yield comparisons in Vermont’s climate. Varietal selection is one of the most important aspects of crop production and significantly influences yield potential. It is important to remember, however, that the data presented are from replicated research trials from only one location in Vermont and represent only one season. The goal of this project was to evaluate yields and protein of thirteen oat varieties

    http://www.uvm.edu/extension/cropsoil/wp-content/uploads/2016-Using-Winter-Rye-as-Forage-in-Corn-Silage-Systems.pdf

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    The interest in growing cereal rye for grain to be sold as cover crop seed, or to other value-added markets (distillers and bakers), has increased considerably across the Northeast region. As a result, farmers and end-users are requesting yield and quality information on cereal rye varieties. In 2016, University of Vermont Extension Northwest Crops and Soils (NWCS) Program conducted a variety trial to evaluate yield and quality of cereal rye. The varieties were Huron, Spooner, Abruzzi, Brasetto, Musketeer, and one variety that was not specified (VNS)
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