13 research outputs found

    Animating Truth

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    Animating Truth examines the rise of animated documentary in the 21st century, and addresses how non-photorealistic animation is increasingly used to depict and shape reality

    The Rise of Animated Non-Fiction: Techno-cultural Context

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    [EN] Why is animation such a central aesthetic in today s epistemic environment and when did viewers begin to accept animation s veracity, despite looking nothing like photorealism or anything one would witness directly? This article explores the techno-cultural reasons for the rise of animated non-fiction in the last 15 years. The article covers animated non-fiction s relation to image production technologies and image manipulation; documentary and surveillance culture; the information age and big data; machine vision, machine perception and AI; and finally, the virtualization of culture.[ES] 驴Por qu茅 es la animaci贸n una est茅tica tan pivotal en el entorno epist茅mico actual y cu谩ndo comenzaron los espectadores a aceptar la veracidad de la animaci贸n, a pesar de no parecerse en nada al fotorrealismo ni a nada que uno pudiera presenciar directamente? Este art铆culo explora las razones tecnoculturales del auge de la no ficci贸n animada en los 煤ltimos 15 a帽os. El art铆culo cubre la relaci贸n de la no ficci贸n animada con las tecnolog铆as de producci贸n de im谩genes y la manipulaci贸n de im谩genes; cultura documental y de vigilancia; la era de la informaci贸n y los big data; visi贸n artificial, percepci贸n artificial e inteligencia artificial; y finalmente, la virtualizaci贸n de la cultura.Ehrlich, N. (2024). El auge de la no ficci贸n animada: contexto tecnocultural. Con A de animaci贸n. (18):14-25. https://doi.org/10.4995/caa.2024.2092814251

    The application of an ecosystem services framework to estimate the economic value of dung beetles to the U.K. cattle industry

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    Agrobiodiversity is declining across global farm production systems. These declines transcend both farm animal genetic resources (FAnGR) and plant genetic resources (PGR). Both can sustain greater adaptability and resilience in commercial production through so called 鈥榦ption value鈥. In addition, PGR and FAnGR embody cultural and heritage attributes that are often absent in global agriculture, but remain valued by society. Conservation is therefore important and economic incentives represent a potential supply-side mechanism to improve the status of rare breeds, cultivars and crop wild relatives. Yet, the exploration of incentive instruments for their conservation remains underexplored but may improve conservation outcomes. Using different survey instruments and modelling approaches (including choice modelling, linear programming and multi criteria decision analysis) I investigate how rationalising incentive support, through more targeted interventions, could result in better conservation outcomes. The findings suggest optimising subsidy support relies on three key factors. First, conservation contracts offered to farmers for conservation should reflect local farm business preferences and circumstances. This includes addressing barriers-to-entry in conservation programmes and the design of contractual schemes, that when improved will likely increase participation in conservation contracts. Second, identifying least cost suppliers of conservation services may enable more diversity to be conserved at comparable cost. Third, optimising what species, varieties and breeds are supported may improve conservation outcomes through more rational investments in diversity. Policy responses to address declining agrobiodiversity should consider the use of tender instruments (i.e. reverse auctions) to identify least cost suppliers for conservation services. Optimisation modelling and decision analysis techniques can be used to measure trade-offs inherent in different conservation goals, including social equity and diversity. Ultimately there is a need to balance the supply of use and non-use values of diversity that span the total economic value framework. While the drive for sustainable intensification of production may improve productivity, we need to be clear how breed and cultivar diversity can be encompassed into future policy priorities that reflect the need for greater food security plus cultural and heritage value attributes. The implications of deploying new and potentially disruptive technologies (i.e. gene editing) in the context of farm diversity are discussed

    El auge de la no ficci贸n animada: contexto tecnocultural

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    驴Por qu茅 es la animaci贸n una est茅tica tan pivotal en el entorno epist茅mico actual y cu谩ndo comenzaron los espectadores a aceptar la veracidad de la animaci贸n, a pesar de no parecerse en nada al fotorrealismo ni a nada que uno pudiera presenciar directamente? Este art铆culo explora las razones tecnoculturales del auge de la no ficci贸n animada en los 煤ltimos 15 a帽os. El art铆culo cubre la relaci贸n de la no ficci贸n animada con las tecnolog铆as de producci贸n de im谩genes y la manipulaci贸n de im谩genes; cultura documental y de vigilancia; la era de la informaci贸n y los big data; visi贸n artificial, percepci贸n artificial e inteligencia artificial; y finalmente, la virtualizaci贸n de la cultura

    Animating Truth

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    Animating Truth examines the rise of animated documentary in the 21st century, and addresses how non-photorealistic animation is increasingly used to depict and shape reality

    Animated realities: from animated documentaries to documentary animation

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    My thesis on contemporary animated documentaries links new media aesthetics with the documentary turn in contemporary visual culture. Drawing from the fields of Contemporary Art, Animation, Film Studies and Gaming Theory, my aim has been to explore the development of animated documentaries in the context of animation's intersection with other visual fields in a very specific technological moment of the past two decades in order to broaden the scope within which animation is analysed and understood. The starting point of my research was the widely accepted divide assumed to exist between animation and documentary. I, however, claim that the supposedly contradictory nature of animated documentaries can no longer be considered a given. Despite the potentially challenging reception of animated documentaries, it is important to identify what it is that the animated image contributes to documentary, which is the visualisation of what is otherwise un-representable. My thesis investigates a new area of the intangible, focusing on the virtualisation of culture rather than on subjective or imaginary aspects of documentary works and visual interpretations. This cultural shift consequently requires new aesthetics of documentation that exceed the capacities of the photographic. My main argument is that due to contemporary technological changes, animation has permeated real contexts of daily life to the extent that it has become disassociated from the realm of fiction. Rather, in altering the way viewers are becoming accustomed to observing, learning about and connecting with reality, animation has brought about a constitutive change in ways of seeing one's world. This change can be described as animation鈥檚 impact on the relation between visual signification and believability. It is this which necessitates a reconsideration of what shapes a sense of realism in documentaries today. My research therefore culminates with new conceptualisations concerning the cultural role of animation, introducing what I argue is the formation of the "animated document" and "documentary animation". In these contexts, animation is no longer an interpretive visualisation substituting for photography but a direct capturing of animated realities. Animation thus expands what is considered to constitute reality and, as a result, also destabilises assumptions about the perceived conflict between animation and documentary, widening the sphere of documentary aesthetics
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