1,735 research outputs found

    Subsidiary and Religious Establishments in the United States Constitution

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    Subsidiary and Religious Establishments in the United States Constitution

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    Faith Leaders Developing Digital Literacies: Demands and Resources across Career Stages According to Theological Educators

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    Despite popular framings about skills for 21st-century jobs, there are few studies of how new media literacies unfold in workplaces, nor of how professional education programs can build on adult learners’ previous experiences to foster effective digital communication practices. We argue that seminaries and divinity schools are a particularly rich context in which to explore these questions. Not only do theological education students represent an unusually wide spectrum of ages compared to graduate programs across professional education, but ministry leadership also lends itself to a sociocultural understanding of digital literacy in which past work-related interpersonal skills are likely to be relevant. This paper revisits data from an interview-based study of theological educators that identified seven Digital Literacies for Ministry. In this new analysis, we use a demands-resources model from workplace psychology to explore and interpret how adult students across career stages engage with these literacies, identifying and illustrating from instructor interview data, and from our own interactions with students, strengths and challenges for each age group. The paper concludes with implications for theological education and other areas of media literacy education in professional schools

    Secularism\u27s Laws: State Blaine Amendments and Religious Persecution

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    The State Blaine Amendments are provisions in thirty-seven state constitutions that restrict persons’ and organizations’ access to public benefits on religious grounds. They arose largely in the mid- to late-1800s in response to bitter strife between an established Protestant majority and a growing Catholic minority that sought equal access to public funding for Catholic schools. After the failure to pass a federal constitutional amendment—the Blaine Amendment —that would have sealed off public school funds from sectarian institutions, similar provisions proliferated in state constitutions. These State Blaines have often been interpreted, under their plain terms, as erecting religion-sensitive barriers to the flow of public benefits that exceed the church-state separation demanded by the Establishment Clause. Today, the State Blaines are becoming increasingly relevant as the Supreme Court has progressively softened federal constitutional barriers to religious access to public funds. This article examines the history, language, and general operation of the State Blaines. It concludes that the State Blaines generally raise explicit, religion-sensitive barriers to the allocation of otherwise available public benefits and, consequently, that the operation of the State Blaines would typically violate the religious non-persecution principle of the First Amendment

    Sustainability: Reusing Data Center Waste Heat

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    Data Centers are facilities used to house a large number of computer systems and their associated components, such as telecommunications and data storage systems. Nowadays many organizations depend on the reliable operation of their data centers for their day to day business operations. Data centers are designed with redundant and backup power supplies, redundant data communications connections, robust cybersecurity protocols and very strict environmental controls. The many computer systems held in a typical data center generate large heat loads that need to be continuously removed with high grade air conditioning systems. Anthem currently owns a large corporate data center in Richmond that generates a large amount of waste heat that is currently dissipated into the environment. The objective of this project is to design a system that will help Anthem reuse some or most of the waste heat generated by the data center, possibly using it to heat the adjoining office building. The proposed system would not only reduce Anthem’s energy costs to heat the office building but it would decrease Anthem’s overall environmental footprint. The solution that the team decided upon is to add a second condenser bundle to an already existing centrifugal chiller. This would allow for a higher-grade heat to be produced. This hot water would then be piped to a coil within the make-up air handler units and the outside air that would normally be heated by natural gas will now be heated by the hot water. The air passing through the coil would now be hot usable air and thus able to be distributed throughout the building.https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/capstone/1128/thumbnail.jp

    Method of attachment influences accelerometer-based activity data in dogs, The

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    Includes bibliographical references (page 6).Background: Accelerometer-based activity monitoring is a promising new tool in veterinary medicine used to objectively assess activity levels in dogs. To date, it is unknown how device orientation, attachment method, and attachment of a leash to the collar holding an accelerometer affect canine activity data. It was our goal to evaluate whether attachment methods of accelerometers affect activity counts. Eight healthy, client-owned dogs were fitted with two identical neck collars to which two identical activity monitors were attached using six different methods of attachment. These methods of attachment evaluated the use of a protective case, positioning of the activity monitor and the tightness of attachment of the accelerometer. Lastly, the effect of leash attachment to the collar was evaluated. For trials where the effect of leash attachment to the collar was not being studied, the leash was attached to a harness. Activity data obtained from separate monitors within a given experiment were compared using Pearson correlation coefficients and across all experiments using the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results: There was excellent correlation and low variability between activity monitors on separate collars when the leash was attached to a harness, regardless of their relative positions. There was good correlation when activity monitors were placed on the same collar regardless of orientation. There were poor correlations between activity monitors in three experiments: when the leash was fastened to the collar that held an activity monitor, when one activity monitor was housed in the protective casing, and when one activity monitor was loosely zip-tied to the collar rather than threaded on using the provided metal loop. Follow-up, pair-wise comparisons identified the correlation associated with these three methods of attachment to be statistically different from the level of correlation when monitors were placed on separate collars. Conclusions: While accelerometer-based activity monitors are useful tools to objectively assess physical activity in dogs, care must be taken when choosing a method to attach the device. The attachment of the activity monitor to the collar should utilize a second, dedicated collar that is not used for leash attachment and the attachment method should remain consistent throughout a study period.Published with support from the Colorado State University Libraries Open Access Research and Scholarship Fund
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