4,457 research outputs found

    Performing lost space: discussing an exercise in recording architectural detail with the performing body

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    The interior of the contemporary art space provides its users with a sterilised laboratory for the placement and experience of art. Increasingly, its bleached interior presents an a priori condition for the legitimate assignment of artworks within the complex milieu of the contemporary city. Such interiors have become an architectural typology, a predetermined homogenous non-place within which artworks reside. In this sense we can look to Lefebvre to understand the condition of the gallery space for ‘inasmuch as abstract space tends towards homogeneity, towards the elimination of existing differences or peculiarities, a new space cannot be born (produced) unless it accentuates differences.’ (Lefebvre: 1991, 52) The work of the artist, by contrast, liberates difference. More specifically, the art of performance simultaneously generates and exposes marginal space within the gallery interior; a corporeal action that deposits residual stains and blemishes across the galleries internal skin, leaving marks and traces that resist homogeneity to create a temporary site of differential experience. The lost, forgotten or overlooked marginal zones and irregularities of a gallery space become a point of ephemeral spectacle and this paper addresses the impact of this spatial and corporeal collision. The research that informs and situates these phenomena traces the irregularities, blemishes and scars that resist conventional mapping; marks that exist within an alternative, unconventional and unbleached space before, during and after a performance act. Recorded through orthographic drawing conventions, the research generated a narrative cartography of corporeal intervention within the interior of X Church Slumgothic, a heavily used semi-decayed community art space in Gainsborough. The co-authors of this research formed a practical collaboration that fused the dynamics and complexities of the performer’s body with the fixed conventions of architectural drawings. The discussion in this paper between performer and draughtsman explores how the body becomes an instrument to record and describe an arts interior beyond, yet from within, traditional architectural systems of representation

    Decline in sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations along the Alaska Peninsula, 1986–2001

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    During the 1990s, sea otter (Enhydra lutris) counts in the Aleutian archipelago decreased by 70% throughout the archipelago between 1992 and 2000. Recent aerial surveys in the Aleutians did not identify the eastward extent of the decline; therefore we conducted an aerial survey along the Alaska Peninsula for comparison with baseline information. Since 1986, abundance estimates in offshore habitat have declined by 27– 49% and 93 –94% in northern and southern Alaska Peninsula study areas, respectively. During this same time period, sea otter density has declined by 63% along the island coastlines within the south Alaska Peninsula study area. Between 1989 and 2001, sea otter density along the southern coastline of the Alaska Peninsula declined by 35% to the west of Castle Cape but density increased by 4% to the east, which may indicate an eastward extent of the decline. In all study areas, sea otters were primarily concentrated in bays and lagoon, whereas historically, large rafts of otters had been distributed offshore. The population declines observed along the Alaska Peninsula occurred at roughly the same time as declines in the Aleutian islands to the east and the Kodiak archipelago to the west. Since the mid-1980s, the sea otter population throughout southwest Alaska has declined overall by an estimated 56–68%, and the decline may be one of the most significant sea otter conservation issues in our time

    Use of atomic force microscopy to study a molecular micelle as an anionic polymer for polyelectrolyte multilayer deposition on polymeric substrates

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    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) have been used as stationary phases for various chiral and achiral separations in open-tubular electrochromatagraphy (OT-CEC). However, the physical characteristics of PEMs are not well understood. The production of PEM coatings involves flowing alternating rinses of positive and negative charged polyelectrolytes onto a surface. Although PEMs are typically deposited on fused silica capillaries, there is growing interest to use this approach in conjunction with microchip devices to enhance separation characteristics. Since microchips are fabricated using polymeric substrates, the deposition of PEMs on these substrates needs to be examined. The study reported in this thesis uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) to examine the thickness and integrity of PEMs deposited on polycarbonate (PC), poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), oxidized poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and a glass wafer as a control. Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and a molecular micelle, poly(sodium N-undecylenyl- L-leucyl-alanate) (poly-L-SULA), were the polyions used in this study. The PEMs flowed through a microfluidic network defined by PDMS channels in contact with the polymer surface. Since salt is used in OT-CEC to increase the surface area in which analytes can interact, the effect of varying the salt concentration of the PDADMAC on the polymeric substrates was investigated, as well as the overall heights and integrity of the PEMs on the various substrates. Inconsistency of the PEM heights within a single system was observed and is most likely the result of roughness or defects within the substrates, leading to incomplete surface coverage. Preliminary data suggest that PDADMAC/SULA coating may prove to be beneficial in achieving microchip separations at NaCl concentrations of 0.1M and lower since higher concentrations lead to the collapse of the PEM assembly

    Pediatric Genetic Counselor Perspective on Serving the Foster Care Population and the Integration of Genetic Information within the Health Passport

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    Many states within the foster care system have adopted a document referred to as the health passport, which provides a condensed summary of a child\u27s health history. This passport is intended to remain with the child as he/she moves between placements to improve communication between foster parents, caseworkers, and medical professionals. This exploratory research study examines the foster care system\u27s utility of a child\u27s health passport and opportunities for improvement through an online survey of the pediatric genetic counselor population. First, counselor perspectives on serving foster children were gathered and summarized into themes. Major elements and/or obstacles of counseling the foster care population involved limited information and records, barriers to genetic testing, and psychosocial differences between caretakers. Second, counselors provided input regarding the inclusion of genetic information within the passport. Specifically, topics such as the counselor\u27s interaction with the passport document, prioritization of information to be included, and recommendations for utilization of the passport were addressed. Of the 81 participants who completed the survey, only 11% had previous familiarity with the document, yet 83% expressed that it would be useful in their practice. Participants were asked to rank items in order of importance regarding inclusion in a health passport and the median value was assessed to determine the order. Maternal pregnancy history was reported as the most important item (4.79), followed by Birth history (4.46), Family history (3.62), Developmental history (3.31), Previous genetic testing (3.21), and Patient personal medical history (1.56). The outcome of this study was to interpret genetic counselors\u27 informational needs and explore how the health passport could address these needs and be incorporated in practice. These results could enhance genetic counselor effectiveness and improve continuity of care for these children

    Archeological Excavation and Reburial of Unmarked Historic Graves in the Pioneer Cemetery (41BO202), Brazoria County, Texas

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    This report signals the completion of a cultural resource consultation process that began several years ago. In 1998, a planning meeting was held between archeologists with the Texas Department of Transportation and the Texas Historical Commission to discuss the planned improvements to State Highway 332 in Brazoria County, Texas, This work required a cultural resources surveys of many segments of the highway, one of which is adjacent to the historic Pioneer Cemetery, a predominantly African American burial ground in the town of Brazoria. Archeological investigations were conducted adjacent to the cemetery but within the highway right of way in 1998 and 1999, and the results of this work were reported in 2002. The investigations identified several unmarked graves that appeared to be within the highway right of way on the east side of SH 332. A subsequent property survey showed that three well-defined graves, and a possible fourth grave, were within the right of way and two others were very close to the right of way line. Following the state and federal cultural resources laws and the state laws pertaining to cemeteries in the Health and Safety Code of Texas, the Texas Department of Transportation undertook a project to remove and relocate the graves within the highway right of way. Prewitt and Associates, Inc., of Austin, Texas, was contracted to do the work (Contract No. 573XXSA001, Work Authorization No. 57304SA001). The exhumation of the burials took place from March 31 to April 3, 2003, and the remains were reburied during a ceremony held on April 4, 2003. This report documents the excavation, removal, and reburial of three unmarked graves dating to the late nineteenth or early twentieth centuries. This archeological study brings closure to this project. From a historical perspective, the remains of three unidentified people—a young woman, an older woman, and an infant—provide a glimpse at African American life in turn-of-the century Brazoria. From a human perspective, the remains from each grave—all human bones, remnants of the wooden caskets, and personal items buried with the person—were treated with the respect and dignity they deserve, and all three have been reburied in a new location safely inside the Pioneer Cemeter

    The role of culture and diversity in the prevention of falls among older Chinese people

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    Original article can be found at : http://journals.cambridge.org/ Copyright Canadian Association on GerontologyThis grounded-theory study explored the perceptions of Chinese older people, living in England, on falls and fear of falling, and identified facilitators and barriers to fall prevention interventions. With a sample of 30 Chinese older people, we conducted two focus groups and 10 in-depth interviews in Mandarin or Cantonese. Interview transcripts, back translated, were analyzed using N6. Constant comparative analysis highlighted a range of health-seeking behaviors after a fall: Chinese older people were reluctant to use formal health services; talking about falls was avoided; older people hid falls from their adult children to avoid worrying them; and fatalistic views about falls and poor knowledge about availability and content of interventions were prevalent. Cost of interventions was important. Chinese older adults valued their independence, and cultural intergenerational relations had an impact on taking action to prevent falls. Cultural diversity affects older adults’ acceptance of fall prevention interventions.Peer reviewe

    Redefining Public Education for Males

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    The moral imperative to educate and save the young men within our communities has never had a higher call to action. Come learn what “The” Barack Obama Male Leadership Academy in Dallas ISD is doing to Save Our Young Men one student at a time through their holistic approach to education

    Using Curcumin Nano-Lipid Particles in a Therapeutic Approach

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    Curcumin (Curcuma longa) is a plant-based polyphenol known to have several medicinal properties. Although several promising effects of using curcumin in clinical trials have been observed, its overall medicinal qualities are still limited due to low bioavailability. In order to increase the bioavailability, we are embedding curcumin within Nano-Lipid Particles (both curcumin telodendrimer discs and curcumin tNLPs). Telodendrimer nanolipoprotein particles (tNLPs) are discoidal self-assemblies containing lipids and apolipoproteins which can be used as a vehicle to carry proteins and other small molecules to the cell. Telodendrimer NLPs have been used to increase the bioavailability of drugs, and provide an ideal platform to increase curcumin bioavailability. The generation of tNLPs can be accomplished using several methods; such as cellfree assembly and in-vitro assembly. Curcumin telodendrimer discs (curcumin telo-discs) are a nano-lipid mixture of lipids, curcumin, and telodendrimer that acts as the basis for the curcumin tNLP reaction. Using the curcumin telo-disc as the starting additive, we demonstrate that we can purify properly formed curcumin tNLPs via affinity columns and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Here, we show that with two separate methods: a cell-free expressed method and in-vitro assembly, we can demonstrate that curcumin

    Erratum to: The Drosophila transcriptional network is structured by microbiota

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