334 research outputs found

    Court Gives Thumbs-Up for Use of Thumbnail Pictures Online

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    In the online world, where intellectual property rights can be violated with the simple click of a mouse, innovation sometimes finds itself engaged in a game of chicken with the law. Recently, online-photo-search engine Ditto.com played just such a game, taking their fight to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Ninth Circuit\u27s holding protects Ditto.com\u27s use of copyrighted photos as transformative fair use. But the holding also addresses inline linking and framing, warning that they can violate copyright even in the face of a fair use

    MusicNet & PressPlay: To Trust or Antitrust?

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    Efforts by leading record labels to fill the void they created by shutting down Napster led several to develop their own subscription online music service. The author of the following iBrief assesses the viability of those services in light of a Justice Department antitrust investigation into the practices of the labels in allegedly quashing smaller distributors and colluding to stifle competition, and considers the ramifications of an antitrust suit for both the major labels and their competitors

    Napping: An intervention for sleep deprived undergraduate and graduate students

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    Sleep is an important physiological process that plays a prominent role in the overall physical and mental health of individuals through impacting cognitive, emotional, and physical functioning (Gruber, 2012). Individuals who do not get adequate sleep are at risk to suffer from insomnia, experience overall activity impairment, and have significantly lower physical and mental productivity than individuals who achieve optimum amounts of sleep (Bolge, Doan, Kannan, & Baran, 2009). Unfortunately, many graduate and undergraduate students do not get sufficient overnight sleep (Forquer, Camden, Gabriau, & Johnson, 2008). One possible solution for these students is to increase their napping activity. Although overnight sleep is very important, recent research shows that napping can benefit individuals who are sleep deprived (Chen, 2013). Research suggests that napping as little as ten minutes when fatigued can have many positive benefits including an increase in energy and cognitive functioning (Tietzel & Lack, 2002). Although napping should not be used as a substitute for overnight sleep, it is a possible solution for students during stressful periods when they are unable to achieve optimum amounts of overnight sleep

    The Fate of Napster: Digital Downloading Faces an Uphill Battle

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    First Diamond Multimedia, then MP3.com, now Napster. The recording industry, in a flurry to protect its copyrighted material, has waged an all-out battle against the dot-coms for the future of copyrighted music on the Internet. Since A&M Records, along with several other labels which comprise the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), filed suit against Napster, emotions have run high in the online community. Some have heralded this technology as a much-needed alternative to the strangling grasp of the major record labels; others view it as blatant theft of property. Students, musicians, computer programmers, trade organizations, and even the US government have voiced their opinions - all perhaps sensing that the outcome of the Napster litigation will have far-reaching consequences. Not only does the current battle over the fate of peer-to-peer technology promise to reshape the face of copyright law, it will also mark the future of the music industry, emerging technologies, and business models for years to come.The following iBrief describes the emergence of Napster\u27s peer-to-peer technology, the legal proceedings to date, and Napster\u27s defensive strategy, as well as the potential technological and cultural ramifications of the Napster cause celebr

    The Future of Database Protection in U.S. Copyright Law

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    In the recent British Horseracing Board case, the English High Court signaled a return to the sweat of the brow standard of copyright protection. Although recent attempts have been made in the United States to protect databases under this standard, this iBrief argues that the information economy is wise to continuing protecting this data through trade secret, State misappropriation and contract law until legislation is passed

    Butterflies Are Free Playbill

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    Providence College Department of Theatre, Dance & Film The Friar\u27s Cell Butterflies are Free by Leonard Gershe Tuesday-Sunday, November 13-18, 1973, 8PM Director, Lynn Rae Slavin Set Designer, R.L. Pelkington, O.P. Stage Manager, Vincent Clark Asst. Stage Manager, Deborah Colozzi Cast: Don Baker - John O\u27Hurley, Jill Tanner - Tracy Quirk, Mrs. Baker - Donna Reiland, Ralph Austin - Nick Walkerhttps://digitalcommons.providence.edu/butterflies_pubs/1001/thumbnail.jp

    Elevated CO2 did not affect the hydrological balance of a mature native Eucalyptus woodland

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    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCa) might reduce forest water-use, due to decreased transpiration, following partial stomatal closure, thus enhancing water-use efficiency and productivity at low water availability. If evapotranspiration (Et) is reduced, it may subsequently increase soil water storage ( S) or surface runoff (R) and drainage (Dg), although these could be offset or even reversed by changes in vegetation structure, mainly increased leaf area index (L). To understand the effect of eCa in a water-limited ecosystem, we tested whether 2 years of eCa (~40% increase) affected the hydrological partitioning in a mature water-limited Eucalyptus woodland exposed to Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE). This timeframe allowed us to evaluate whether physiological effects of eCa reduced stand water-use irrespective of L, which was unaffected by eCa in this timeframe. We hypothesized that eCa would reduce tree-canopy transpiration (Etree), but excess water from reduced Etree would be lost via increased soil evaporation and understory transpiration (Efloor) with no increase in S, R or Dg. We computed Et, S, R and Dg from measurements of sapflow velocity, L, soil water content (?), understory micrometeorology, throughfall and stemflow. We found that eCa did not affect Etree, Efloor, S or ? at any depth (to 4.5 m) over the experimental period. We closed the water balance for dry seasons with no differences in the partitioning to R and Dg between Ca levels. Soil temperature and ? were the main drivers of Efloor while vapour pressure deficit-controlled Etree, though eCa did not significantly affect any of these relationships. Our results suggest that in the short-term, eCa does not significantly affect ecosystem water-use at this site. We conclude that water-savings under eCa mediated by either direct effects on plant transpiration or by indirect effects via changes in L or soil moisture availability are unlikely in water-limited mature eucalypt woodlands. (c) 2018 John Wiley and Sons LtdEuropean Commission; EucFACE is supported by the Australian Commonwealth Government in collaboration with the Western Sydney University (WSU). EucFACE was built as an initiative of the Australian Government as part of the Nation-building Economic Stimulus Package. TEG was funded by a research collaborative agreement between CSIRO and WSU within the CSIRO Flagship programme “Water for a Healthy Country” during this research, and funded by the IdEx programme of the Université de Bordeaux and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Intra-European fellowship (Grant Agreement No. 653223) during manuscript preparation

    Author Correction: FAM222A encodes a protein which accumulates in plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (Nature Communications, (2020), 11, 1, (411), 10.1038/s41467-019-13962-0)

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    In the original version of the manuscript, the image shown in Figure 4g, bottom row (Aβ1–42 + rAggregatin), under “6h” was incorrect. This image incorrectly showed the same sample as shown in the original Figure 4g, top row (Aβ1–42), under “0.5h”. The correct version of figure 4g is as follows: (Figure presented.) which replaces the previous incorrect version: (Figure presented.)
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