66 research outputs found

    BALANCING PRODUCTIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVE PROGRAM (EQIP)

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    A concern with productivity has to be tempered with our history of declining real prices for agricultural commodities which signal to some degree a certain amount of excess capacity in agriculture in the United States. Thus, environmental concerns today may logically outweigh productivity concerns. Conservation Programs that preceded the present EQIP program, such as the ACP, often had a productivity component that also was designed to help redistribute income to farmers. In terms of productivity, this may have been as direct as subsidizing the application of lime or the installation of drainage. It may have been more indirect, such as improving damaged lands that could then be returned to production. In any case, some portion of conservation programs was seen as productivity enhancing. This was viewed as a worthwhile public expenditure as was the income transfer that went along with it.Environmental Economics and Policy,

    ENERGY POLICY ISSUES FOR AGRICULTURE

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    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Is Agribusiness Any Different?

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    The Viability of Specialized Fields in Agricultural Economics is addressed. The critical question for longevity is, what makes it special? Examples that illustrate how specialties emerge, how they change, and what makes them viable over time is presented. The primary question of: Is Agribusiness Any Different and Is There A Place For It? is set against the background of a need to recognize that Business education today has a high perceived value. Business education today has its focus on analysis. The author believes there is a place for agribusiness if it creates a focus more aligned with what will go on in business.Agribusiness,

    DEVELOPING AN ENERGY POLICY EDUCATION PROGRAM

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    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    THE ENERGY TRANSITION: BACKGROUND ON SYNTHETIC FUEL ALTERNATIVES

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    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Agricultural/Renewable Contributions to U.S. Electricity Usage

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    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    U.S. Ethanol Policy: Is It the Best Energy Alternative?

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    U.S. ethanol policy has several drivers. Among these are increasing the incomes of U.S. corn farmers, enhancing the environment, providing a source of sustainable energy, and reducing dependence on foreign oil. Each of these has its own advocates and critics. While it is true that ethanol production can enhance the incomes of corn farmers, some ask who benefits more from the public subsidy of ethanol production – farmers or processors. Some question whether ethanol always delivers a clean air benefit and whether it provides a source of sustainable energy while reducing dependence on foreign oil. The large public subsidy provided for ethanol production is yet another issue. While all of the above considerations relate to ethanol policy, this article focuses primarily on energy-related issues. The context for ethanol policy is U.S. energy policy, which is almost exclusively supply driven. Consistent with this thrust, the current target is to increase annual ethanol production from 3 billion to 5 billion gallons over the next several years. At the direct subsidy level of US0.52pergallonofethanolproduced,thislevelofproductionwillresultinapublicexpenditureofUSUS0.52 per gallon of ethanol produced, this level of production will result in a public expenditure of US2.6 billion. The question is, what other options might provide better energy alternatives on the basis of cost and other considerations?Agricultural and Food Policy,

    FARM POLICY IN AN INDUSTRIALIZED AGRICULTURE

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    The structural changes that will impact agriculture over the next decade will be profound. The economic benefits of the dual dimensions of industrialization of agriculture-implementation of a manufacturing approach to the food and industrial product production and distribution chain, and negotiated coordination among the stages in that chain are expected to result in a much more industrialized agricultural sector. The implications of this industrialization process for agricultural markets and market policy, and agricultural policy in general, are critical. The focal point of this discussion is the set of public policy options that might be considered to shape the future structure of the agricultural sector.concentration, contract production, industrialization, policy, vertical alignment, Agricultural and Food Policy, Industrial Organization,

    PUBLIC POLICY EDUCATION ON INFLATION

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    Financial Economics,
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