19 research outputs found

    Biotic Succession in a Douglas Fir Forest on Saddleback Mountain (Oregon Coast Range)

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    This grant proposal, submitted to the National Science Foundation in 1959 by Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds, requested funding to continue an ecological study at Saddleback Mountain. Dirks-Edmunds requested $15,570.05 to fund weekly trips with students to the site in order to collect meteorological and synecological data on the forest; she anticipated the project would last two years. Dr. Dirks-Edmunds graduated from Linfield College in 1937; she returned to teach in the Biology department at Linfield from 1941-1974

    Humidity Graph of Saddleback Biotic Succession

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    This document reflects the succession of growth in the Saddleback research station. The old forest, it shows, was eventually replaced by stages of regrowth after logging, but never fully recovered

    Notes for Problems of Ecology Presentation to the Linfield Research Institute

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    These notes were prepared by Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds for a presentation she gave to a Linfield Research Institute (LRI) seminar at Linfield College on March 19, 1957 on the subject of ecology. LRI was established in 1955, and Dr. Dirks-Edmunds did research under its auspices, including receiving a federal grant which funded work on biotic succession

    Ecology - As I See It

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    Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds summarizes her research experiences on Saddleback Mountain in Oregon. Several handwritten corrections are included. Dirks-Edmunds began studying the area in 1933 with her advisor at Linfield College, Dr. James A. Macnab. In 1940, the research site was logged and her study switched from detailing an existing Douglas fir community to tracking its regrowth. Dr. Dirks-Edmunds graduated from Linfield College in 1937; she returned to teach in the Biology department at Linfield from 1941-1974

    Saddlebag Insects Log Book

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    These pages from a log book serve as the key to the specimens collected by Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds at the Saddleback Research Station in Oregon

    Plant Index Card for \u3cem\u3eRubus parviflorus\u3c/em\u3e,Western Thimbleberry

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    This is one example of a research card used by Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds. Dirks-Edmunds used these cards to catalog the plants, animals, and insects at her Saddleback Mountain research site during the 1950s. This card has notes on Rubus parviflorus (thimbleberry) a part of the Rosaceae (rose) family

    Christmas Greetings 1967

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    This Christmas letter from Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds and her husband Ray Edmunds, sent to friends and family in 1967, shares experiences from their frequent travels during that year

    Comparison of Biotic Communities of the Cedar-Hemlock and Oak-Hickory Associations, Final Version

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    A revised version of the final draft of Dr. Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds\u27s doctoral dissertation was published in Ecological Monographs in 1947. In her dissertation, Dirks-Edmunds compared the Douglas fir forest community on Saddleback Mountain in Oregon to an oak-hickory community in Illinois. Dirks-Edmunds, a 1937 graduate of Linfield College, graduated from the University of Illinois in 1941; she returned to teach in the Biology department at Linfield from 1941-1974

    Jane Claire Dirks\u27s Correspondence with Stanley G. Jewett

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    This exchange between Jane Claire Dirks (later Jane Claire Dirks-Edmunds) and Stanley G. Jewett, a biologist with Region 1 of the Fish and Wildlife Service (serving Oregon and five other states), is an example of the type of correspondence Dirks had with various experts on the Pacific forest region while she was completing her doctoral thesis. Dirks-Edmunds began to study Zoology in Illinois immediately after earning her Bachelor\u27s degree in Biology from Linfield College in 1937. She returned to teach in the Biology department at Linfield from 1941-1974
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