1,146 research outputs found

    Exploring the interaction of explicit, genre-based instruction with antecedent genres and student engagement.

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    This dissertation enters the ongoing discussion regarding whether or not genre can and/or should be explicitly taught in the classroom. It begins with an overview of genre theory, specifically centering on explicit genre instruction and the question of genre context. It uses genre, transfer, student engagement, and creativity scholarship, as well as my own empirical research, to argue that instructors might best enable students to learn genres by linking classroom instruction not the social genre context, but to the individual’s genre context. I sought to evaluate such a pedagogical possibility by examining individual students’ propensity to cross genre boundaries, to repurpose their antecedent genre knowledge, and to engage with their writing assignments. The dissertation reports the results of my analysis in six chapters. Chapter one provides a comprehensive literature review and discusses the framework I developed for my project, over-viewing the concepts of boundary crossing, antecedent genres, student engagement, and creativity. Chapter two reports my procedures for data collection, coding, and analysis, and describes the data sources for this project: interviews with four instructors and fifteen students, as well as pre- and post-writing surveys gathered from students in six first year composition courses. Chapters three through six report the results of my research. In chapter three I examine the presence of a powerful, direct, pervasive, and at times, obstructive influence that I termed the “antecedent effect,” or students’ tendency to default to antecedent genre knowledge in a rhetorical situation. Chapter four reports the potentially mitigating impact of explicit instruction on the antecedent effect, specifically suggesting that explicit instruction may enable more students to cross genre boundaries than otherwise would. Chapter five suggests that student engagement with writing prompts may be nearly universal, but also argues that such engagement may not always be positive for learning. This chapter also reveals an extensive overlap between boundary crossing, student engagement, and creativity. Finally, chapter six synthesizes the theoretical and pedagogical implications of my findings, recognizes the limitations of the research I have performed, and suggests areas for future research, including suggestions on ways that such research might be conducted based on my findings

    Avoided level crossing statistics in open chaotic billiards

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    We investigate a two-level model with a large number of open decay channels in order to describe avoided level crossing statistics in open chaotic billiards. This model allows us to describe the fundamental changes of the probability distribution of the avoided level crossings compared with the closed case. Explicit expressions are derived for systems with preserved and broken Time Reversal Symmetry (TRS). We find that the decay process induces a modification at small spacings of the probability distribution of the avoided level crossings due to an attraction of the resonances. The theoretical predictions are in complete agreement with the recent experimental results of Dietz \textit{et al.} (Phys. Rev. E {\bf 73} (2006) 035201)

    Invertebrate Biomass and Richness in Various Food Plot Types in East Texas

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    As northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) chicks are dependent on invertebrates for food, land managers often use spring/summer food plots to meet these needs. We examined invertebrate production in native vegetation and 6 different food plot types (i.e., fallow disking only; fallow disking and fertilizing; or disking, fertilizing, and planting a single species [browntop millet, iron and clay peas, or sorghum] or a multi-species mix [browntop millet, catjang peas, iron and clay peas, Japanese millet, and pearl millet]) in the Pineywoods of east Texas. Invertebrates were collected weekly during the summers of 1997 and 1999 and for 5 weekly sampling periods during summer, 1998. For each food plot type, invertebrates were separated from debris, air dried, and weighed as a group. Bi-weekly, a 100-invertebrate sub-sample was randomly selected from each sample and sorted to order with weight and number of individuals recorded. When spring precipitation was sufficient, multi-species food plots produced greater (P \u3c 0.05) invertebrate biomass than fallow or native vegetation plots, and all cultivated plots had more (P \u3c 0.05) biomass than native vegetation. Likewise, all cultivated plots had more (P \u3c 0.05) biomass than fallow plots in early summer but not in mid- and late summer. A combination of multi-species (with legumes) food plots and fallow disking should provide bobwhite chicks with invertebrates throughout most summers

    Perspectives on Large Language Models for Relevance Judgment

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    When asked, current large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT claim that they can assist us with relevance judgments. Many researchers think this would not lead to credible IR research. In this perspective paper, we discuss possible ways for LLMs to assist human experts along with concerns and issues that arise. We devise a human-machine collaboration spectrum that allows categorizing different relevance judgment strategies, based on how much the human relies on the machine. For the extreme point of "fully automated assessment", we further include a pilot experiment on whether LLM-based relevance judgments correlate with judgments from trained human assessors. We conclude the paper by providing two opposing perspectives - for and against the use of LLMs for automatic relevance judgments - and a compromise perspective, informed by our analyses of the literature, our preliminary experimental evidence, and our experience as IR researchers. We hope to start a constructive discussion within the community to avoid a stale-mate during review, where work is dammed if is uses LLMs for evaluation and dammed if it doesn't

    An assessment of climate action by high-carbon global corporations

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    Corporations are a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions1–3 and an important actor in mitigating climate change.4 This paper presents and analyses a database of corporate climate action, which provides an up-to-date assessment of companies’ carbon management practices, as well as systematically benchmarking companies’ emissions pathways against international targets. Our analysis covers 138 companies in 7 high-emitting sectors, accounting for 21% of emissions from all listed companies globally.5 While a majority of companies has implemented basic carbon management practices, we find that less than half of them have implemented more strategic practices. Further analysis indicates companies separate into a class that hardly undertakes any carbon management practices, and a class that undertakes most. Perhaps surprisingly, most corporate emissions targets in our sample are aligned with the Paris Agreement goals, although most companies are yet to set quantified targets. Companies that have implemented more carbon management practices today are more likely to have set 2°C-aligned targets. Carbon management and emissions performance are associated most strongly with where companies are headquartered and their size

    The Lantern Vol. 16, No. 3, Spring 1948

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    • Not So Light • Babba\u27s Luck • Winter Night • God Hath Wrought • Less Than Trivia • What is Progress? • Betrayal • The Key • Journey From a Star • War and Peace • Experiment in Prose Poetry • Dawn • Eternal Question • My Gift • Jazz Fantasy • M.W. Witmerhttps://digitalcommons.ursinus.edu/lantern/1045/thumbnail.jp

    Application of the lumped age-class technique to studying the dynamics of malaria-mosquito-human interactions

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    A series of models of malaria-mosquito-human interactions using the Lumped Age-Class technique of Gurney & Nisbet are developed. The models explicitly include sub-adult mosquito dynamics and assume that population regulation occurs at the larval stage. A challenge for modelling mosquito dynamics in continuous time is that the insect has discrete life-history stages (egg, larva, pupa & adult), the sub-adult stages of relatively fixed duration, which are subject to very different demographic rates. The Lumped Age-Class technique provides a natural way to treat this type of population structure. The resulting model, phrased as a system of delay-differential equations, is only slightly harder to analyse than traditional ordinary differential equations and much easier than the alternative partial differential equation approach. The Lumped Age-Class technique also allows the natural treatment of the relatively fixed time delay between the mosquito ingesting Plasmodium and it becoming infective. Three models are developed to illustrate the application of this approach: one including just the mosquito dynamics, the second including Plasmodium but no human dynamics, and the third including the interaction of the malaria pathogen and the human population (though only in a simple classical Ross-Macdonald manner). A range of epidemiological quantities used in studying malaria such as the vectorial capacity, the entomological inoculation rate and the basic reproductive number (R0) are derived, and examples given of the analysis and simulation of model dynamics. Assumptions and extensions are discussed. It is suggested that this modelling framework may be a natural and useful tool for exploring a variety of issues in malaria-vector epidemiology, especially in circumstances where a dynamic representation of mosquito recruitment is required
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