1,040 research outputs found

    Named entity recognition on flemish audio-visual and news-paper archives

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    Linking an integrated framework with appropriate methods for measuring QoE

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    Quality of Experience (QoE) has recently gained recognition for being an important determinant of the success of new technologies. Despite the growing interest in QoE, research into this area is still fragmented. Similar - but separate - efforts are being carried out in technical as well as user oriented research domains, which are rarely communicating with each other. In this paper, we take a multidisciplinary approach and review both user oriented and technical definitions on Quality of Experience (including the related concept of User Experience). We propose a detailed and comprehensive framework that integrates both perspectives. Finally, we take a first step at linking methods for measuring QoE with this framework

    Highlights of the ERS Lung Science Conference and Sleep and Breathing Conference 2021 and the new ECMC members

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    The Lung Science Conference (LSC) and the Sleep and Breathing Conference (SBC) are two conferences organised by the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the latter held in association with the European Sleep Research Society. This year, the LSC and SBC were both held in a virtual format with the participation of researchers and clinicians from around the world. The participation of Early Career Members (ECMs) was notable in both events: 216 of 363 (60%) delegates attending the LSC were under 40?years old, and 315 of 920 (34%) delegates were ?40?years of age at the SBC. Both conferences included outstanding talks on the most recent advances in respiratory medicine and science, oral/poster communication sessions on novel research, exciting opportunities to network with peers, and much more!This paper provides a brief overview of some of the most remarkable sessions of the LSC and SBC, written by ECMs attending the sessions.We also present the new members of the Early Career Member Committee (ECMC) of the ERS from Assemblies 1, 4, 10, 12 and 13, who were elected in the latest round of ERS elections. Welcome aboard

    A Qualitative Exploration of Factors Affecting Group Cohesion and Team Play in Multiplayer Online Battle Arenas (MOBAs)

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    Previous research examining the social psychology of video-gaming has tended to focus on Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG) environments, such as World of Warcraft. Although many online group processes have been examined using this game, this genre does not enforce cooperative play and studies tend to be based on very large groups. Newer genres are being developed and played which have so far not been studied. The genre known as Multiplayer Online Battle Arenas (MOBAs) are attracting large numbers of players and success depends on effective team playing within smaller groups. The study reported here explores team play within MOBAs. Due to the lack of literature examining this genre, Corbin and Strauss’ (2008) Grounded Theory was used to analyse participants’ subjective experiences of playing MOBAs to create a conceptual model. A focus group pilot study informed the development of questions and then semi-structured interviews took place with twelve participants; 1 female and 11 male students aged between 18-21 years. Participants were required to have recent and frequent MOBA exposure, but with different preferences regarding roles and experience. Data was analysed using open, axial and selective coding and the resulting model depicts a scale, as optimal team performance was linked to a balance between factors. The core category “Communication” was heavily influenced by the relationship between teammates (friends or strangers). The balance of “Communication” affected the balance of the final three categories: “Team Composition”, “Psychological State” and “Level of Play”. The conceptual model is critically linked with traditional group processes, such as Belbin’s (1993) team roles, Tuckman’s (1965) model of group development and the perceptions and behaviour during the state of deindividuation (Taylor & MacDonald, 2002). The model has real-world application in both social and professional virtual environments, whilst contributing more broadly to research in Cyberpsychology and Social Psychology. Further research is suggested which will test predictions based on a predictive model

    Survivorship of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) in Relation with Malaria Incidence in the Brazilian Amazon

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    We performed a longitudinal study of adult survival of Anopheles darlingi, the most important vector in the Amazon, in a malarigenous frontier zone of Brazil. Survival rates were determined from both parous rates and multiparous dissections. Anopheles darlingi human biting rates, daily survival rates and expectation of life where higher in the dry season, as compared to the rainy season, and were correlated with malaria incidence. The biting density of mosquitoes that had survived long enough for completing at least one sporogonic cycle was related with the number of malaria cases by linear regression. Survival rates were the limiting factor explaining longitudinal variations in Plasmodium vivax malaria incidence and the association between adult mosquito survival and malaria was statistically significant by logistic regression (P<0.05). Survival rates were better correlated with malaria incidence than adult mosquito biting density. Mathematical modeling showed that P. falciparum and P. malariae were more vulnerable to changes in mosquito survival rates because of longer sporogonic cycle duration, as compared to P. vivax, which could account for the low prevalence of the former parasites observed in the study area. Population modeling also showed that the observed decreases in human biting rates in the wet season could be entirely explained by decreases in survival rates, suggesting that decreased breeding did not occur in the wet season, at the sites where adult mosquitoes were collected. For the first time in the literature, multivariate methods detected a statistically significant inverse relation (P<0.05) between the number of rainy days per month and daily survival rates, suggesting that rainfall may cause adult mortality
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