11 research outputs found

    Breeding Ones' Own Subprime Crisis: The effects of labour market on financial system stability

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    n this paper we take a simulation approach towards household budgets survey, analysing the impact of changes in labour market status of household members on the ability of this household to service the mortgage payments. Using the current status as benchmark, we performed simulations using stylised facts about labour market evolutions. Households with mortgage are characterised by higher activity rates and lower unemployment rates than demographically comparable households without a credit. While these are typical preconditions for the credit approval decision, this state of matters may not necessarily persist throughout the entire mortgage service period. Firstly, labour market conditions may worsen in general, comprising the credit takers together with the rest of the population. Alternatively, credit takers may undergo employment experience in the \emph{same way} as other labour market participants. Consequently, we performed analyses along two scenarios: (i) households with mortgages will gradually become alike the demographically comparable group in terms of employment performance; and (ii) recognising the fact that debtor households members may exert potentially higher effort in maintaining labour market status we model the effects of general employment outlooks deterioration. We use labour force survey data to obtain the probabilities of changing the individual labour market status, while we resort to propensity score matching techniques to provide adequate benchmark for the changes among creditors with relation to general population. In the simulations we find the share of creditors loosing liquidity with the change in the labour market status and the implied burden to the financial sector stability.financial sector stability, mortgages, labour market

    The long run-effects of the Poland's accession to the eurozone. Simulation using POLDYN - a dynamic computable general equilibrium model.

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    The aim of this paper is to assess the non-monetary effects of the euro accession of Poland. The literature identifies two channels that potentially may affect the economy: (i) diminishing of investment risk premia through lower interest rates and cost of capital services and (ii) trade creation effects due to elimination of currency transaction spreads, better price comparability and elimination of currency risk. We employ a dynamic general equilibrium model with perfect foresight multiple households, adjustment cost of capital, disaggregated labor market. We directly model trade-driven productivity spillovers. Our simulations show a long run GDP gain from the euro accession at the level of 7.5% of benchmark GDP of which 90% is realized in first 10 years. The main factor behind growth is investment that leads to an extra 12.6 percent of extra capital accumulated in the long run. The welfare gains amount to roughly 2% of the value of GDP each year. The sensitivity analysis proves that the model behavior is reasonably resistant to parameter changes

    The long run-effects of the Poland's accession to the eurozone. Simulation using POLDYN - a dynamic computable general equilibrium model.

    Get PDF
    The aim of this paper is to assess the non-monetary effects of the euro accession of Poland. The literature identifies two channels that potentially may affect the economy: (i) diminishing of investment risk premia through lower interest rates and cost of capital services and (ii) trade creation effects due to elimination of currency transaction spreads, better price comparability and elimination of currency risk. We employ a dynamic general equilibrium model with perfect foresight multiple households, adjustment cost of capital, disaggregated labor market. We directly model trade-driven productivity spillovers. Our simulations show a long run GDP gain from the euro accession at the level of 7.5% of benchmark GDP of which 90% is realized in first 10 years. The main factor behind growth is investment that leads to an extra 12.6 percent of extra capital accumulated in the long run. The welfare gains amount to roughly 2% of the value of GDP each year. The sensitivity analysis proves that the model behavior is reasonably resistant to parameter changes

    Breeding Ones' Own Subprime Crisis: The effects of labour market on financial system stability

    Get PDF
    n this paper we take a simulation approach towards household budgets survey, analysing the impact of changes in labour market status of household members on the ability of this household to service the mortgage payments. Using the current status as benchmark, we performed simulations using stylised facts about labour market evolutions. Households with mortgage are characterised by higher activity rates and lower unemployment rates than demographically comparable households without a credit. While these are typical preconditions for the credit approval decision, this state of matters may not necessarily persist throughout the entire mortgage service period. Firstly, labour market conditions may worsen in general, comprising the credit takers together with the rest of the population. Alternatively, credit takers may undergo employment experience in the \emph{same way} as other labour market participants. Consequently, we performed analyses along two scenarios: (i) households with mortgages will gradually become alike the demographically comparable group in terms of employment performance; and (ii) recognising the fact that debtor households members may exert potentially higher effort in maintaining labour market status we model the effects of general employment outlooks deterioration. We use labour force survey data to obtain the probabilities of changing the individual labour market status, while we resort to propensity score matching techniques to provide adequate benchmark for the changes among creditors with relation to general population. In the simulations we find the share of creditors loosing liquidity with the change in the labour market status and the implied burden to the financial sector stability

    Breeding Ones' Own Subprime Crisis: The effects of labour market on financial system stability

    Get PDF
    n this paper we take a simulation approach towards household budgets survey, analysing the impact of changes in labour market status of household members on the ability of this household to service the mortgage payments. Using the current status as benchmark, we performed simulations using stylised facts about labour market evolutions. Households with mortgage are characterised by higher activity rates and lower unemployment rates than demographically comparable households without a credit. While these are typical preconditions for the credit approval decision, this state of matters may not necessarily persist throughout the entire mortgage service period. Firstly, labour market conditions may worsen in general, comprising the credit takers together with the rest of the population. Alternatively, credit takers may undergo employment experience in the \emph{same way} as other labour market participants. Consequently, we performed analyses along two scenarios: (i) households with mortgages will gradually become alike the demographically comparable group in terms of employment performance; and (ii) recognising the fact that debtor households members may exert potentially higher effort in maintaining labour market status we model the effects of general employment outlooks deterioration. We use labour force survey data to obtain the probabilities of changing the individual labour market status, while we resort to propensity score matching techniques to provide adequate benchmark for the changes among creditors with relation to general population. In the simulations we find the share of creditors loosing liquidity with the change in the labour market status and the implied burden to the financial sector stability

    The long run-effects of Poland's accession to the eurozone. Simulation using POLDYN - a dynamic computable general equilibrium model.

    No full text
    The aim of this paper is to assess the non-monetary effects of the euro accession of Poland. The literature identifies two channels that potentially may affect the economy: (i) diminishing of investment risk premia through lower interest rates and cost of capital services and (ii) trade creation effects due to elimination of currency transaction spreads, better price comparability and elimination of currency risk. We employ a dynamic general equilibrium model with perfect foresight multiple households, adjustment cost of capital, disaggregated labor market. We directly model trade-driven productivity spillovers. Our simulations show a long run GDP gain from the euro accession at the level of 7.5% of benchmark GDP of which 90% is realized in first 10 years. The main factor behind growth is investment that leads to an extra 12.6 percent of extra capital accumulated in the long run. The welfare gains amount to roughly 2% of the value of GDP each year. The sensitivity analysis proves that the model behavior is reasonably resistant to parameter changes

    Breeding one's own sub-prime crisis: The labour market effects on financial system stability

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    Crisis may spread through economy via the propagating mechanisms of the labour market - households becoming delinquent due to an initial unemployment shock may be unable to continue servicing obligations versus the financial system. With large debts - e.g. mortgages - such defaults pose a threat to financial system stability. In this paper we use the Polish household budget surveys to simulate the impact of changes in the labour market status of household members on the ability of the household to service its mortgage payments. The simulation results are subsequently aggregated to facilitate a macro-level interpretation of the findings. We simulate various scenarios of labour market deterioration. Finally, we also introduce a policy instrument into the simulations providing, in a fiscally neutral manner, additional stability to the financial system. Based on robustness checks, the findings seem to be reliable. The results suggest that even with shares of debtors among consumers as low as in Poland, the propagation mechanism may indeed result in a considerable threat, while the fiscally neutral instrument is effective and well-suited to be addressed in providing additional stability to the financial system.Financial sector stability Mortgages Labour market
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