85 research outputs found

    A topological analysis of void spaces in tungstate frameworks:assessing storage properties for the environmentally important guest molecules and ions: CO<sub>2</sub>, UO<sub>2</sub>, PuO<sub>2</sub>, U, Pu, Sr<sup>2</sup>+, Cs+, CH<sub>4</sub>, and H<sub>2</sub>

    Get PDF
    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from ACS via http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acssuschemeng.5b00369The identification of inorganic materials, which are able to encapsulate environmentally important small molecules or ions via host-guest interactions, is crucial for the design and development of next-generation energy sources and for storing environmental waste. Especially sought after are molecular sponges with the ability to incorporate CO2, gas pollutants, or nuclear waste materials such as UO2 and PuO2 oxides or U, Pu, Sr2+ or Cs+ ions. Porous framework structures promise very attractive prospects for applications in environmental technologies, if they are able to incorporate CH4 for biogas energy applications, or to store H2, which is important for fuel cells e.g. in the automotive industry. All of these applications should benefit from the host being resistant to extreme conditions such as heat, nuclear radiation, rapid gas expansion, or wear and tear from heavy gas cycling. As inorganic tungstates are well known for their thermal stability, and their rigid open-framework networks, the potential of Na2O-Al2O3-WO3 and Na2O-WO3 phases for such applications was evaluated. To this end, all known experimentally-determined crystal structures with the stoichiometric formula MaM?bWcOd (M = any element) are surveyed together with all corresponding theoretically calculated NaaAlbWcOd and NaxWyOz structures that are statistically likely to form. Network descriptors that categorize these host structures are used to reveal topological patterns in the hosts, including the nature of porous cages which are able to accommodate a certain type of guest; this leads to the classification of preferential structure types for a given environmental storage application. Crystal structures of two new tungstates NaAlW2O8 (1) and NaAlW3O11 (2) and one updated structure determination of Na2W2O7 (3) are also presented from in-house X-ray diffraction studies, and their potential merits for environmental applications are assessed against those of this larger data-sourced survey. Overall, results show that tungstate structures with three-nodal topologies are most frequently able to accommodate CH4 or H2, while CO2 appears to be captured by a wide range of nodal structure types. The computationally generated host structures appear systematically smaller than the experimentally determined structures. For the structures of 1 and 2, potential applications in nuclear waste storage seem feasible.J. M. C. is indebted to the Fulbright Commission for a UK-US Fulbright Scholar Award hosted by Argonne National Laboratory where work done was supported by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

    Final Results of a Randomized, Phase III Study of Rituximab With or Without Idelalisib Followed by Open-Label Idelalisib in Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Get PDF
    PURPOSE A randomized, double-blind, phase III study of idelalisib (IDELA) plus rituximab versus placebo plus rituximab in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was terminated early because of superior efficacy of the IDELA-plus-rituximab (IDELA/R) arm. Patients in either arm could then enroll in an extension study to receive IDELA monotherapy. Here, we report the long-term efficacy and safety data for IDELA-treated patients across the primary and extension studies. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients were randomly assigned to receive rituximab in combination with either IDELA 150 mg twice daily (IDELA/R; n = 110) or placebo (placebo/R; n = 110). Key end points were progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. RESULTS The long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with IDELA was assessed in 110 patients who received at least one dose of IDELA in the primary study, 75 of whom enrolled in the extension study. The IDELA/R-to-IDELA group had a median PFS of 20.3 months (95% CI, 17.3 to 26.3 months) after a median follow-up time of 18 months (range, 0.3 to 67.6 months). The ORR was 85.5% (94 of 110 patients; n = 1 complete response). The median OS was 40.6 months (95% CI, 28.5 to 57.3 months) and 34.6 months (95% CI, 16.0 months to not reached) for patients randomly assigned to the IDELA/R and placebo/R groups, respectively. Prolonged exposure to IDELA increased the incidence of all-grade, grade 2, and grade 3 or greater diarrhea (46.4%, 17.3%, and 16.4%, respectively), all-grade and grade 3 or greater colitis (10.9% and 8.2%, respectively) and all-grade and grade 3 or greater pneumonitis (10.0% and 6.4%, respectively) but did not increase the incidence of elevated hepatic aminotransferases. CONCLUSION IDELA improved PFS and OS compared with rituximab alone in patients with relapsed CLL. Long-term IDELA was effective and had an expected safety profile. No new IDELA-related adverse events were identified with longer exposure

    Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction

    Get PDF
    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)1-(x+y), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Qmax = 28 Ã…-1) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and PO bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials

    The programme on ecosystem change and society (PECS)–a decade of deepening social-ecological research through a place-based focus

    Get PDF
    The Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) was established in 2011, and is now one of the major international social-ecological systems (SES) research networks. During this time, SES research has undergone a phase of rapid growth and has grown into an influential branch of sustainability science. In this Perspective, we argue that SES research has also deepened over the past decade, and helped to shed light on key dimensions of SES dynamics (e.g. system feedbacks, aspects of system design, goals and paradigms) that can lead to tangible action for solving the major sustainability challenges of our time. We suggest four ways in which the growth of place-based SES research, fostered by networks such as PECS, has contributed to these developments, namely by: 1) shedding light on transformational change, 2) revealing the social dynamics shaping SES, 3) bringing together diverse types of knowledge, and 4) encouraging reflexive researchers

    Genomic, Pathway Network, and Immunologic Features Distinguishing Squamous Carcinomas

    Get PDF
    This integrated, multiplatform PanCancer Atlas study co-mapped and identified distinguishing molecular features of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) from five sites associated with smokin

    Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context

    Get PDF
    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are commonly dys-regulated in tumors, but only a handful are known toplay pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferredlncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, onco-genes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes) bymodeling their effects on the activity of transcriptionfactors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays.Our predictions included hundreds of candidateonco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancerlncRNAs) whose somatic alterations account for thedysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and path-ways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrateproof of concept, we showed that perturbations tar-geting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor) andTUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs) dysre-gulated cancer genes and altered proliferation ofbreast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis in-dicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregu-lated in a tumor-specific manner, some, includingOIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergis-tically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumorcontexts

    Pan-cancer Alterations of the MYC Oncogene and Its Proximal Network across the Cancer Genome Atlas

    Get PDF
    Although theMYConcogene has been implicated incancer, a systematic assessment of alterations ofMYC, related transcription factors, and co-regulatoryproteins, forming the proximal MYC network (PMN),across human cancers is lacking. Using computa-tional approaches, we define genomic and proteo-mic features associated with MYC and the PMNacross the 33 cancers of The Cancer Genome Atlas.Pan-cancer, 28% of all samples had at least one ofthe MYC paralogs amplified. In contrast, the MYCantagonists MGA and MNT were the most frequentlymutated or deleted members, proposing a roleas tumor suppressors.MYCalterations were mutu-ally exclusive withPIK3CA,PTEN,APC,orBRAFalterations, suggesting that MYC is a distinct onco-genic driver. Expression analysis revealed MYC-associated pathways in tumor subtypes, such asimmune response and growth factor signaling; chro-matin, translation, and DNA replication/repair wereconserved pan-cancer. This analysis reveals insightsinto MYC biology and is a reference for biomarkersand therapeutics for cancers with alterations ofMYC or the PMN

    Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Get PDF
    Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumorinfiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment

    Improving medication adherence in diabetes type 2 patients through Real Time Medication Monitoring: a Randomised Controlled Trial to evaluate the effect of monitoring patients' medication use combined with short message service (SMS) reminders

    Get PDF
    Contains fulltext : 97026.pdf (publisher's version ) (Open Access)BACKGROUND: Innovative approaches are needed to support patients' adherence to drug therapy. The Real Time Medication Monitoring (RTMM) system offers real time monitoring of patients' medication use combined with short message service (SMS) reminders if patients forget to take their medication. This combination of monitoring and tailored reminders provides opportunities to improve adherence. This article describes the design of an intervention study aimed at evaluating the effect of RTMM on adherence to oral antidiabetics. METHODS/DESIGN: Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) with two intervention arms and one control arm involving diabetes type 2 patients with suboptimal levels of adherence to oral antidiabetics (less than 80% based on pharmacy refill data). Patients in the first intervention arm use RTMM including SMS reminders and a personal webpage where they can monitor their medication use. Patients in the second intervention arm use RTMM without SMS reminders or webpage access. Patients in the control arm are not exposed to any intervention. Patients are randomly assigned to one of the three arms. The intervention lasts for six months. Pharmacy refill data of all patients are available from 11 months before, until 11 months after the start of the intervention. Primary outcome measure is adherence to oral antidiabetics calculated from: 1) data collected with RTMM, as a percentage of medication taken as prescribed, and as percentage of medication taken within the correct time interval, 2) refill data, taking the number of days for which oral antidiabetics are dispensed during the study period divided by the total number of days of the study period. Differences in adherence between the intervention groups and control group are studied using refill data. Differences in adherence between the two intervention groups are studied using RTMM data. DISCUSSION: The intervention described in this article consists of providing RTMM to patients with suboptimal adherence levels. This system combines real time monitoring of medication use with SMS reminders if medication is forgotten. If RTMM proves to be effective, it can be considered for use in various patient populations to support patients with their medication use and improve their adherence. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register NTR1882
    • …
    corecore