2,218 research outputs found

    A Brief Overview of the Life and Work of Lyon Henry Appleby, M.D. (1895-1970).

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    The life and work of Dr. Lyon Henry Appleby, M.D., portrays the essence of a devoted clinician committed to scholarly excellence. Born in Deseronto, Ontario, in 1895 and passing in 1970, Dr. Appleby influenced all areas of general surgery, most notably popularizing a procedure that bears his name today. After a tour in World War I, he quickly proved himself to be a dedicated clinician with roots in academia, which translated into excellence within the Department of Surgery at St. Paul\u27s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. He served in various leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Surgery, President of the International College of Surgeons, and Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Appleby procedure, or en bloc removal of the celiac axis, at the time of gastrectomy, is the technical focus of this paper, although reference is made to Appleby\u27s extensive contributions to historical medicine

    Roscoe Reid Graham (1890 to 1948): a Canadian pioneer in general surgery.

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    Roscoe Reid Graham, a Canadian surgeon trained at the University of Toronto, was a true pioneer in the field of general surgery. Although he may be best known for his omental patch repair of perforated duodenal ulcers-often referred to as the Graham patch -he had a number of other significant accomplishments that decorated his surgical career. Dr. Graham is credited with being the first surgeon to successfully enucleate an insulinoma. He ventured to do an essentially brand new operation based solely on his patient\u27s symptoms and physical findings, a courageous move that even some of the most talented surgeons would shy away from. He also spent a large portion of his career dedicated to the study of rectal prolapse, working tirelessly to rid his patients of this awful affliction. He was recognized by a number of different surgical associations for his operative successes and was awarded membership to those both in Canada and the United States. Despite all of these accolades, Dr. Graham remained grounded and always fervent in his dedication to the patient and their presenting symptom(s), reminding us that to do anything more would be meddlesome. In an age when medical professionals are often all too eager to make unnecessary interventions, it is imperative that we look back at our predecessors such as Roscoe Reid Graham, for they will continually redirect us toward our one and only obligation: the patient

    James Mann, M.D. (1759-1832): Military Surgeon for the Second War of Independence .

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    The War of 1812 is remembered for the Burning of Washington, and Francis Scott Key’s “The Star Spangled Banner,” but little else. It was a poorly funded war of relatively short duration and nebulous resolution. Under such circumstances, it is understandable that the “Second War of Independence” failed to produce many notable military or medical advancements. However, one surgeon took it upon himself to recount his experiences in the field. For his dedication to the art and science of medicine, James Mann deserves recognition

    William Arbuthnot Lane (1856-1943): Surgical Innovator and His Theory of Autointoxication.

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    William Arbuthnot Lane contributed to the advancement of many fields of orthopedics, otolaryngology, and general surgery. He is credited for his no-touch technique and the invention of long-handled instruments, some of which are still in use today, to minimize tissue handling. He is most well known for his hypothesis that slowing of gastric contents could cause a variety of ailments and this became known as Lane\u27s disease. Although his surgical treatment of Lane\u27s disease is now defunct, it advanced the surgical technique in colorectal surgery. It seems likely that some of Lane\u27s autointoxication patients would be classified today as patients with colonic inertia, diverticulitis, colonic volvulus, and megacolon or, which are all treated with colectomy. Lane was a pioneer in multiple fields and a true general surgeon. He advanced colorectal surgery immensely and propelled the field of surgery into a new era

    Emil Zuckerkandl, M.D. (1849-1910): Bridging Anatomic Study and the Operating Room Table.

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    In the mid-19th century, the Vienna School of Anatomy was at the epicenter of the rapidly growing field of anatomy. One of the school’s most distinguished professors, Hungarian-born anatomist Emil Zuckerkandl was instrumental in transforming anatomy from a descriptive science to one of practical and clinical value. A prolific researcher interested in nearly all areas of morphology and most famously, the chromaffin system, Zuckerkandl’s discoveries from more than a century ago still provide a foundation for surgeons to this day

    Analysis of Clostridium difficile patterns at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital

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    AIMS: To analyze CDI patterns to TJUH, particularly in Opportunity Units To visually examine the relationship between CDI cases within units Provide data analysis to the CDI working grouphttps://jdc.jefferson.edu/patientsafetyposters/1072/thumbnail.jp

    Mary H. Gibbon: teamwork of the heart.

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    Mary Maly Hopkinson Gibbon was born on September 25, 1903, to an affluent New England family who encouraged her to embrace her intelligence and to follow that by which she was intrigued. In doing this, Maly pursued work in scientific research, where she ultimately met her first husband, Dr. John ‘‘Jack’’ H. Gibbon. Jack and Maly were partners in every sense of the word. Their collaboration, both within and beyond the walls of the research laboratory, made it possible for the Gibbon dream of the heart–lung machine to be realized

    Robert Edward Gross (1905-1988): ligation of a patent ductus arteriosus and the birth of a specialty.

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    The early 20th century saw an explosion in surgical expertise. Specialties dedicated to delicate organs such as the heart and vulnerable populations, like children, were in their infancy. Dr. William E. Ladd, the father of pediatric surgery, founded the first dedicated department of pediatric surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital in 1910. At the time, attempts at cardiac surgery almost universally ended in death of the patient. The first successful surgical treatment of the cardiac valves would not occur for another 15 years, and the great vessels would remain out of reach for decades more. Dr. Robert E. Gross, the shy and humble heir to the greats of this epoch, would push these embryonic fields into the modern era and train a generation of surgeons to face countless new challenges (Fig. 1)
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