412 research outputs found

    Tellus4 evaluation

    Get PDF

    Rockwall To Royse City Pipeline Route Rockwall County, Texas

    Get PDF
    North Texas Municipal Water District is proposing to construct a 3.05- mile-long pipeline and a storage tank area (measuring up to 4.7 acres) in Rockwall County, Texas. The combination of permanent and temporary easements varies along the route but they are never wider than 70 ft combined. AR Consultants, Inc. (ARC) was contracted to survey the route and conducted the survey March 17 and 26, 2015. No prehistoric archaeological sites were found during the survey. This follows the predictions made prior to field work which were based on the project area’s location in the upper reaches of the Camp Creek Watershed. One historic farmstead site (41RW30) was recorded. This site consists of a well/cistern at a location of a mapped structure on maps dating to the 1920s through the 1970s. However, no structure remains and the only intact feature is the well/cistern. Additionally, the artifacts recovered are indicative of an early to mid-20th century residence and the site lacks overall integrity. Given the results of this survey, AR Consultants, Inc. recommends that further cultural resource investigations are unnecessary for this project, and requests that the Texas Historical Commission concur with this recommendation

    Determining the Influence of Electronic Messages on Consumer Behavior Based on Perceived Source Trust and Credibility

    Get PDF
    With the growing presence of the internet, it is difficult for consumers to separate valuable information from useless information, and for marketers to determine what information consumers deem valuable. This paper aims to discover which message source - Corporate, Social, or Independent - is most trustworthy in the eyes of consumers. Corporate sources include paid platforms such as the company’s website and social media channels managed by the company, social sources include reviews posted on social media platforms by unpaid users who are not directly associated with the company, and independent sources include reviews from online articles, specialized publications, discussion forums, etc. To test the trustworthiness of these sources we compiled and distributed an online survey that would gather the attitudes and opinions of consumers on each source. Our findings showed that consumers favor independent sources over social sources, but favor both social and independent sources over corporate ones

    Design of a Device for Hands-Free Tree Climbing

    Get PDF
    The URI senior capstone design Team 17 was tasked by Dr. Bahram Nassersharif to design and build a tree climbing device. It was required that said tree climbing device be: easy to operate, safe for both the operator and the tree, have hands free climbing capabilities, climb branch free trees with varying diameters between 12 and 24 inches up to 20 feet in height, have a carrying capacity up to 350 pounds, and cost less than 500 dollars to build. Team 17 began the design process to meet these requirements by first undertaking background research into the current tree climbing devices on the market today, including patent searches and viewing found solutions from around the world. This allowed Team 17 to move forward and generate 120 design concepts, finding many potential solutions using varying power sources and mounting methodologies. From these potential solutions the team evaluated each design on the design parameters set forth. The chosen design was a human powered device with a pneumatic assistance system. This design was chosen for its ease of use, low cost to manufacture and maintain, and potential loading capabilities. With a design chosen the team moved forward designing and redesign the device to meet the design specifications. Through testing of the various iterations of the design, engineering analysis, knowledge learned through research, the final design was built, meeting the required design specifications. This build was capable of holding 350 pounds and ascend branch less trees with varying diameter trees from 12 to 43 inches up to 20 feet. The design consists of two frame assemblies, connected through the pneumatic assistance system. A final engineering analysis was completed on this design, yielding a factor of safety of 1.5. The build cost a total of 463.95 dollars. Additional considerations were made including manufacturability, ease of use, environmental impacts, safety, operating environments, and reasonable servicing schedules; since use in remote locations is to be expected. The design is for any individual intending to climb a tree; including but not limited to hunters, arborists, and photographers
    corecore