9,421 research outputs found

    [Review of] Gretchen M. Bataille, David M. Gradwohl, and Charles L. P. Silet (Eds.), The Worlds Between Two Rivers: Perspectives on American Indians in Iowa

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    The presentation of symposia papers in book form poses several editorial problems, the chief of which is maintaining a unity of focus between the various offerings. With one or two notable exceptions, the papers in this collection treat aspects of the Native-American experience within the boundaries of the present state of Iowa, but, unfortunately, that rubric is too broad to provide an organizing principle definite enough to hold the book together. The result is something of a mixed bag. Although each of the papers is presented as a “chapter” and some attempt at cross-reference between individual papers is made, it is necessary to approach each of the sections on its own terms

    Neighbourhood mobility in context : household moves and changing neighbourhoods in the Netherlands

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    Although high levels of population mobility are often viewed as a problem at the neighbourhood level we know relatively little about what makes some neighbourhoods more mobile than others. The main question in this paper is to what extent differences in out-mobility between neighbourhoods can be explained by differences in the share of mobile residents, or whether other neighbourhood characteristics also play a role. To answer this question we focus on the effects of the socioeconomic status and ethnic composition of neighbourhoods and on neighbourhood change. Using data from the Netherlands population registration system and the Housing Demand Survey we model population mobility both at individual and at neighbourhood levels. The aggregate results show that the composition of the housing stock and of the neighbourhood population explain most of the variation in levels of neighbourhood out-mobility. At the same time, although ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands are shown to be relatively immobile, neighbourhoods with higher concentrations of ethnic minority residents have the highest population turnovers. The individual-level models show that people living in neighbourhoods which experience an increase in the percentage of ethnic minorities are more likely to move, except when they belong to an ethnic minority group themselves. The evidence suggests that 'white flight' and 'socio-economic flight' are important factors in neighbourhood change.PostprintPeer reviewe

    Family migration and mobility sequences in the United States

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    Significant changes in family composition in the past quarter-century raise important questions about life-course outcomes embedded in these family changes, especially in relation to the migratory and mobility patterns of individuals and families. The classic distinction between long-distance/employment and short-distance/housing-related moves may be eroding. Patterns of movement appear much less dichotomous and more diverse as family structures become more diverse. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics this study shows that the previous research, which suggested relatively simple links between long-distance and short-distance moves, is an over-simplification. Moreover, there is much more unintended movement at both migratory and mobility scales suggesting the economic models of employment migration may be missing important family dynamics in the migration mobility process.children, family migration, households, life course, moving intentions, residential mobility, sequences

    Double Bottom Line Progress Report: Assessing Social Impact in Double Bottom Line Ventures, Methods Catalog

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    Outlines methods for social entrepreneurs and their investors to define, measure and communicate social impact and return in early-stage ventures

    Double Bottom Line Project Report: Assessing Social Impact in Double Bottom Line Ventures

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    This tool expresses costs and social impacts of an investment in monetary terms. Quantification is achieved according to one or more of three measures: NPV (the aggregate value of all costs, revenues and social impacts discounted), benefit-cost ratio (the discounted value of revenues and positive impacts divided by discounted value of costs and negative impacts) and internal rate of return (the net value of revenues plus impacts expressed as an annual percentage return on the total costs of the investment)

    Will Fat Taxes Cause Americans to Become Fatter? Some Evidence from US Meats

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    Price and income elasticities of fat from meats are estimated by decomposing composite demand for meat into the produ ct of total calories, the fraction of calories eat as fat, and a residual measure of quality. This demand-characteristic system provides estimates of the impact of prices and income on the fraction of calories eaten as fat as well as their affect on the total consumption of fat. Empirical estimates of the comp ensated own-price elasticities of meats suggest that a fat tax designed to raise revenues to finance nutritional education efforts may increase the total consumption of fat.Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,

    Compatibility of potential reinforcing ceramics with Ni and Fe aluminides

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    There is a great deal of interest in the possible utilization of intermetallic compounds in advanced high temperature gas turbine engines. These compounds exhibit a variety of promising properties, including reasonable strength, high melting points, relatively low densities, and good corrosion resistance. However, in general, they also show limited ductilities and toughness, and less than optimum creep strengths at elevated temperatures. In addition, in applications involving advanced gas turbine engines, it is often necessary for candidate materials to have large elastic moduli. The present study is part of a program whose objective is to identify a high temperature fiber reinforced composite. The approach adopted was to fabricate laboratory samples of the combinations of materials considered by Misra, in order to determine the extent to which the thermodynamic calculations can predict phase stability. As many of the ceramic phases considered are not currently available in fiber form, they were added as particulates to the alloy matrices. The ways in which the materials were produced and evaluated are described
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