61,702 research outputs found

    A Case for the Human Condition

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    Perspective Distortion

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    Fish or Cut Bait? Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Creation of the St. Lawrence Seaway

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    “Our relations with Canada, happily always close, involve more and more the unbreakable ties of strategic interdependence. Both nations now need the St. Lawrence Seaway for security as well as for economic reasons. I urge the Congress promptly to approve our participation and construction.” When President Dwight D. Eisenhower included these sentences in his State of the Union Address in January of 1954, there must have been an almost audible sigh of relief from the thousands of Seaway activists, Congressmen, and lobbyists across the country. The previous year had not been an easy one for supporters of the St. Lawrence Seaway project, but now in 1954 they had the guaranteed support of the most powerful and popular man in the nation

    The Unsung Vigilance: A History of Sentinel

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    At risk of over using a popular cliché, there are objects everywhere on the Gettysburg College campus that are “hidden in plain sight.” For some objects, it is easy to stay hidden in this manner. Though we as college students and faculty pass them each day, they are simple plaques embedded in the cement paths we walk on, or the porticos of the academic buildings we enter without even thinking. Yet for other objects, it remains a perpetual mystery as to how even the infamously dense mind of the modern young adult could fail to, at least notice. The sculpture Sentinel, the massive conglomeration of stone and mortar standing 10 feet tall, is one such object. The plaque that is embedded in the ground at the foot of this monstrosity provides only vague enlightenment. [excerpt] Course Information: Course Title: HIST 300: Historical Method Academic Term: Fall 2009 Course Instructor: Dr. Michael J. Birkner \u2772 Hidden in Plain Sight is a collection of student papers on objects that are hidden in plain sight around the Gettysburg College campus. Topics range from the Glatfelter Hall gargoyles to the statue of Eisenhower and from historical markers to athletic accomplishments. You can download the paper in pdf format and click View Photo to see the image in greater detail.https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/hiddenpapers/1008/thumbnail.jp

    Some numerical methods for integrating systems of first-order ordinary differential equations

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    Report on numerical methods of integration includes the extrapolation methods of Bulirsch-Stoer and Neville. A comparison is made nith the Runge-Kutta and Adams-Moulton methods, and circumstances are discussed under which the extrapolation method may be preferred

    Associative Retrieval by Dynamic Transforms

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    Associative memory technique used on digital computer for calculating address and binary comparison using single search cycl

    Many-body methods for nuclear systems at subnuclear densities

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    This article provides a concise review of selected topics in the many-body physics of low density nuclear systems. The discussion includes the condensation of alpha particles in supernova envelopes, formation of three-body bound states and the BEC-BCS crossover in dilute nuclear matter, and neutrino production in SS-wave paired superfluid neutron matter.Comment: 10 pages, 3 figures. Talk given by AS at "Recent Progress in Many-Body Theories 14", Barcelona, 2007. To be published by World Sci., eds. G.E. Astrakharchik, J. Boronat, and F. Mazzant

    The subnuclear localization of tRNA ligase in yeast

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    Yeast tRNA ligase is an enzyme required for tRNA splicing. A study by indirect immune fluorescence shows that this enzyme is localized in the cell nucleus. At higher resolution, studies using indirect immune electron microscopy show this nuclear location to be primarily at the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope, most likely at the nuclear pore. There is a more diffuse, secondary location of ligase in a region of the nucleoplasm within 300 nm of the nuclear envelope. When the amount of ligase in the cell is increased, nuclear staining increases but staining of the nuclear envelope remains constant. This experiment indicates that there are a limited number of ligase sites at the nuclear envelope. Since the other tRNA splicing component, the endonuclease, has the characteristics of an integral membrane protein, we hypothesize that it constitutes the site for the interaction of ligase with the nuclear envelope
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