2,314 research outputs found

    Fiscal autonomy for Scotland? A rejoinder

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    In their paper „A restatement of the case for fiscal autonomy‟ Hallwood and MacDonald (2006b) claim that Barnett is a formula for a rake‟s progress and that fiscal autonomy, as outlined in their previous paper „The economic case for Scottish fiscal autonomy: with or without independence‟ (Hallwood and MacDonald, 2006a), offers a superior financial settlement for Scotland. We here restate our continued disagreements with their argument. We start with corrections of their interpretation of our paper „Flaws and myths in the case for Scottish fiscal autonomy‟ (Ashcroft, Christie and Swales, 2006) before highlighting where we believe their latest paper fails to provide answers to important questions we posed

    Joining or Exiting the Defined Benefit Division Superannuation Scheme of UniSuper

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    The Defined Benefit Division of UniSuper is a large defined benefit superannuation scheme in Australia for public universities. Unlike public service superannuation schemes in Australia, it is not guaranteed by the employers. This has previously led to a reduction in benefits of the scheme due to expected funding shortfalls. This paper examines longstanding and more recent issues with the funding of the Defined Benefit Division. Recent changes to superannuation laws in Australia may result in further benefit reductions for the scheme in the future. Should new eligible employees join the Defined Benefit Division? What form of retirement benefit should be taken by retiring Defined Benefit Division members? The paper examines these two key questions. Employees who are contemplating joining the Defined Benefit Division, or those Defined Benefit Division members about to retire, have some very important decisions to make

    Shining light on the function of NPH3/RPT2-like proteins in phototropin signalling

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    Long-Distance Marketing of Sweet Potato from the Highlands of Papua New Guinea: An Analysis of Consumer Preferences and Supplier Responsiveness

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    Sweet potato is by far the most important staple food in Papua New Guinea. While much is consumed as a subsistence crop, it is also an important income earner for many small holder farmers in the Highlands of PNG. Of the Highlands sweet potato sold, about 90 percent is traded informally on open markets, locally or in coastal urban markets. Data from a consumer survey, from an informant interview of highlands suppliers and from consumer and supplier observations at the Lae market (the largest coastal urban market for sweet potato) was used to explore the extent to which Highland sweet potato in the coastal urban market of Lae, may be considered a differentiated product. As a staple food being sold on informal markets one may think it is best represented as an undifferentiated commodity. On the other hand, there are many different varieties as well as different offerings (e.g. heap sizes, washed/unwashed and Highland/Lowland) which suggest some product differentiation characteristics. Results suggest that consumer preferences in the Lae market are sophisticated and preferences are highly differentiated. It was also found that Highland suppliers do have some appreciation of the consumer preferences in the Lae market. However, it is also apparent that suppliers do not know how to differentiate their product to effectively meet demand and hence they are not very customer-responsive. The implications are that there is considerable potential to improve marketing strategy and management to take advantage of sophisticated consumer preferences.Consumer preferences, differentiated product, Highland suppliers, supplier awareness, supplier responsiveness, marketing strategies, Lae, International Relations/Trade,

    Tectonic study of the post-cambrian thrusts of the Assynt region

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    Southeastern Tanzanian Benedictine Monasteries: Filling a Void of Governmental Services for the Poorest Regions

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    This research illuminates the partnership of a particular civil society actor, Benedictine monasteries, in achieving developmental goals and delivery outcomes for education and health in Tanzania. Faith based organizations (FBOs) like these Benedictine monasteries quietly persevered with their work. These monasteries without governmental support were able to achieve similar results in areas of Tanzania deprived of infrastructure and consistent governmental administrative attention. Monastic apostolate fervor is similar to the professionalism exhibited by international aid organizations and nongovernmental organizations in their desire to meet the needs of the poor. Motivations are complex and varied from evangelization to political and strategic agendas to economic paradigm promulgation (socialism, capitalism, and communism). The analysis used mixed-methods for the purpose of testing the hypotheses. There are two dependent variables: educational attainment and infant mortality. These two variables are chosen because of linkages to government spending and government activities associated with educational attainment and infant mortality is well documented. Regression analysis was used to test outcomes in health and education based on the independent variables of rural percentage of population, population, Benedictine presence, and per capita income by region. Case studies will focus on four distinct regions within Tanzania, two in the north (Mwanza and Shinyanga) and two in the south (Rukwa and Ruvuma). Benedictine monasteries indeed fill the void of governmental services in Rukwa and Ruvuma regions and support the achievement of higher educational attainment and lower infant mortality rates in those regions

    A Structural Analysis Of The Symphony For Band By Vincent Persichetti

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    ADES report on headteacher recruitment

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