28 research outputs found

    Word appraisal depending on referential context and word valence.

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    <p>Valence ratings of nouns depending on valence and referential context for healthy controls (HC) and patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). (*) p<.10, p**<.01, *** p<.001.</p

    Gene Expression Profiles in Relation to Tension and Dissociation in Borderline Personality Disorder

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    <div><p>The biological underpinnings of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and its psychopathology including states of aversive tension and dissociation is poorly understood. Our goal was to examine transcriptional changes associated with states of tension or dissociation within individual patients in a pilot study. Dissociation is not only a critical symptom of BPD but has also been associated with higher risk for self-mutilation and depression. We conducted a whole blood gene expression profile analysis using quantitative PCR in 31 female inpatients with BPD. For each individual, two samples were drawn during a state of high tension and dissociation, while two samples were drawn at non-tension states. There was no association between gene expression and tension states. However, we could show that Interleukin-6 was positively correlated to dissociation scores, whereas Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(s) subunit alpha isoforms, Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 and 8, Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(i) subunit alpha-2, Beta-arrestin-1 and 2, and Cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein were negatively correlated to dissociation. Our data point to a potential association of dissociation levels with the expression of genes involved in immune system regulation as well as cellular signalling/second-messenger systems. Major limitations of the study are the the possibly heterogeneous cell proportions in whole blood and the heterogeneous medication.</p></div

    Correlations between self-referential appraisal bias and attributional style.

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    <p>Healthy controls (HC) and patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) differ in correlations of valence ratings referred to the self in comparison to others and internal, stable and global attributions of negative events for positive and neutral nouns.</p

    Whole-brain maps illustrate smaller gray matter volumes in patients with borderline personality disorders compared to healthy controls (1a) and negative correlations between gray matter volume and the severity of BPD symptoms (1b).

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    <p>For visualization purposes, the statistical maps were thresholded at T>2.5. Size and location of clusters are reported in <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0065824#pone-0065824-t001" target="_blank">Table 1</a> and <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0065824#pone-0065824-t002" target="_blank">2</a>.</p

    DSS total scores and tension sub-scores for tension and non-tension state.

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    <p>Scores are averages over the two observations in each state. The dashed line represents the patients and the two states of each patient.</p

    PPI full factorial analysis of positive correlation with the amygdala; interaction effects for group by valence by temperature, mean beta values and standard error of the mean of the peak voxels in the middle frontal gyrus (2a), and lentiform nucleus (2b).

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    <p>PPI full factorial analysis of positive correlation with the amygdala; interaction effects for group by valence by temperature, mean beta values and standard error of the mean of the peak voxels in the middle frontal gyrus (2a), and lentiform nucleus (2b).</p

    Seed Voxels of the PPI analyses.

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    <p>(1a); Prefrontal regions with negative coupling to the amygdala (red) insula (yellow) and perigenual ACC (green) in BPD when negative pictures were combined with painful temperature (1b).</p
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