344 research outputs found

    Linear Precoding in Cooperative MIMO Cellular Networks with Limited Coordination Clusters

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    In a cooperative multiple-antenna downlink cellular network, maximization of a concave function of user rates is considered. A new linear precoding technique called soft interference nulling (SIN) is proposed, which performs at least as well as zero-forcing (ZF) beamforming. All base stations share channel state information, but each user's message is only routed to those that participate in the user's coordination cluster. SIN precoding is particularly useful when clusters of limited sizes overlap in the network, in which case traditional techniques such as dirty paper coding or ZF do not directly apply. The SIN precoder is computed by solving a sequence of convex optimization problems. SIN under partial network coordination can outperform ZF under full network coordination at moderate SNRs. Under overlapping coordination clusters, SIN precoding achieves considerably higher throughput compared to myopic ZF, especially when the clusters are large.Comment: 13 pages, 5 figure

    The Impact of CSI and Power Allocation on Relay Channel Capacity and Cooperation Strategies

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    Capacity gains from transmitter and receiver cooperation are compared in a relay network where the cooperating nodes are close together. Under quasi-static phase fading, when all nodes have equal average transmit power along with full channel state information (CSI), it is shown that transmitter cooperation outperforms receiver cooperation, whereas the opposite is true when power is optimally allocated among the cooperating nodes but only CSI at the receiver (CSIR) is available. When the nodes have equal power with CSIR only, cooperative schemes are shown to offer no capacity improvement over non-cooperation under the same network power constraint. When the system is under optimal power allocation with full CSI, the decode-and-forward transmitter cooperation rate is close to its cut-set capacity upper bound, and outperforms compress-and-forward receiver cooperation. Under fast Rayleigh fading in the high SNR regime, similar conclusions follow. Cooperative systems provide resilience to fading in channel magnitudes; however, capacity becomes more sensitive to power allocation, and the cooperating nodes need to be closer together for the decode-and-forward scheme to be capacity-achieving. Moreover, to realize capacity improvement, full CSI is necessary in transmitter cooperation, while in receiver cooperation optimal power allocation is essential.Comment: Accepted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communication

    Transmit Signal and Bandwidth Optimization in Multiple-Antenna Relay Channels

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    Transmit signal and bandwidth optimization is considered in multiple-antenna relay channels. Assuming all terminals have channel state information, the cut-set capacity upper bound and decode-and-forward rate under full-duplex relaying are evaluated by formulating them as convex optimization problems. For half-duplex relays, bandwidth allocation and transmit signals are optimized jointly. Moreover, achievable rates based on the compress-and-forward transmission strategy are presented using rate-distortion and Wyner-Ziv compression schemes. It is observed that when the relay is close to the source, decode-and-forward is almost optimal, whereas compress-and-forward achieves good performance when the relay is close to the destination.Comment: 16 pages, 10 figure

    Joint Coding and Scheduling Optimization in Wireless Systems with Varying Delay Sensitivities

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    Throughput and per-packet delay can present strong trade-offs that are important in the cases of delay sensitive applications.We investigate such trade-offs using a random linear network coding scheme for one or more receivers in single hop wireless packet erasure broadcast channels. We capture the delay sensitivities across different types of network applications using a class of delay metrics based on the norms of packet arrival times. With these delay metrics, we establish a unified framework to characterize the rate and delay requirements of applications and optimize system parameters. In the single receiver case, we demonstrate the trade-off between average packet delay, which we view as the inverse of throughput, and maximum ordered inter-arrival delay for various system parameters. For a single broadcast channel with multiple receivers having different delay constraints and feedback delays, we jointly optimize the coding parameters and time-division scheduling parameters at the transmitters. We formulate the optimization problem as a Generalized Geometric Program (GGP). This approach allows the transmitters to adjust adaptively the coding and scheduling parameters for efficient allocation of network resources under varying delay constraints. In the case where the receivers are served by multiple non-interfering wireless broadcast channels, the same optimization problem is formulated as a Signomial Program, which is NP-hard in general. We provide approximation methods using successive formulation of geometric programs and show the convergence of approximations.Comment: 9 pages, 10 figure

    Distortion Minimization in Gaussian Layered Broadcast Coding with Successive Refinement

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    A transmitter without channel state information (CSI) wishes to send a delay-limited Gaussian source over a slowly fading channel. The source is coded in superimposed layers, with each layer successively refining the description in the previous one. The receiver decodes the layers that are supported by the channel realization and reconstructs the source up to a distortion. The expected distortion is minimized by optimally allocating the transmit power among the source layers. For two source layers, the allocation is optimal when power is first assigned to the higher layer up to a power ceiling that depends only on the channel fading distribution; all remaining power, if any, is allocated to the lower layer. For convex distortion cost functions with convex constraints, the minimization is formulated as a convex optimization problem. In the limit of a continuum of infinite layers, the minimum expected distortion is given by the solution to a set of linear differential equations in terms of the density of the fading distribution. As the bandwidth ratio b (channel uses per source symbol) tends to zero, the power distribution that minimizes expected distortion converges to the one that maximizes expected capacity. While expected distortion can be improved by acquiring CSI at the transmitter (CSIT) or by increasing diversity from the realization of independent fading paths, at high SNR the performance benefit from diversity exceeds that from CSIT, especially when b is large.Comment: Accepted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Information Theor

    Minimum Expected Distortion in Gaussian Layered Broadcast Coding with Successive Refinement

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    A transmitter without channel state information (CSI) wishes to send a delay-limited Gaussian source over a slowly fading channel. The source is coded in superimposed layers, with each layer successively refining the description in the previous one. The receiver decodes the layers that are supported by the channel realization and reconstructs the source up to a distortion. In the limit of a continuum of infinite layers, the optimal power distribution that minimizes the expected distortion is given by the solution to a set of linear differential equations in terms of the density of the fading distribution. In the optimal power distribution, as SNR increases, the allocation over the higher layers remains unchanged; rather the extra power is allocated towards the lower layers. On the other hand, as the bandwidth ratio b (channel uses per source symbol) tends to zero, the power distribution that minimizes expected distortion converges to the power distribution that maximizes expected capacity. While expected distortion can be improved by acquiring CSI at the transmitter (CSIT) or by increasing diversity from the realization of independent fading paths, at high SNR the performance benefit from diversity exceeds that from CSIT, especially when b is large.Comment: To appear in the proceedings of the 2007 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory, Nice, France, June 24-29, 200

    Capacity Gain from Two-Transmitter and Two-Receiver Cooperation

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    Capacity improvement from transmitter and receiver cooperation is investigated in a two-transmitter, two-receiver network with phase fading and full channel state information available at all terminals. The transmitters cooperate by first exchanging messages over an orthogonal transmitter cooperation channel, then encoding jointly with dirty paper coding. The receivers cooperate by using Wyner-Ziv compress-and-forward over an analogous orthogonal receiver cooperation channel. To account for the cost of cooperation, the allocation of network power and bandwidth among the data and cooperation channels is studied. It is shown that transmitter cooperation outperforms receiver cooperation and improves capacity over non-cooperative transmission under most operating conditions when the cooperation channel is strong. However, a weak cooperation channel limits the transmitter cooperation rate; in this case receiver cooperation is more advantageous. Transmitter-and-receiver cooperation offers sizable additional capacity gain over transmitter-only cooperation at low SNR, whereas at high SNR transmitter cooperation alone captures most of the cooperative capacity improvement.Comment: Accepted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Information Theor
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