35 research outputs found

    Pruned Continuous Haar Transform of 2D Polygonal Patterns with Application to VLSI Layouts

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    We introduce an algorithm for the efficient computation of the continuous Haar transform of 2D patterns that can be described by polygons. These patterns are ubiquitous in VLSI processes where they are used to describe design and mask layouts. There, speed is of paramount importance due to the magnitude of the problems to be solved and hence very fast algorithms are needed. We show that by techniques borrowed from computational geometry we are not only able to compute the continuous Haar transform directly, but also to do it quickly. This is achieved by massively pruning the transform tree and thus dramatically decreasing the computational load when the number of vertices is small, as is the case for VLSI layouts. We call this new algorithm the pruned continuous Haar transform. We implement this algorithm and show that for patterns found in VLSI layouts the proposed algorithm was in the worst case as fast as its discrete counterpart and up to 12 times faster.Comment: 4 pages, 5 figures, 1 algorith

    Filter Bank Fusion Frames

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    In this paper we characterize and construct novel oversampled filter banks implementing fusion frames. A fusion frame is a sequence of orthogonal projection operators whose sum can be inverted in a numerically stable way. When properly designed, fusion frames can provide redundant encodings of signals which are optimally robust against certain types of noise and erasures. However, up to this point, few implementable constructions of such frames were known; we show how to construct them using oversampled filter banks. In this work, we first provide polyphase domain characterizations of filter bank fusion frames. We then use these characterizations to construct filter bank fusion frame versions of discrete wavelet and Gabor transforms, emphasizing those specific finite impulse response filters whose frequency responses are well-behaved.Comment: keywords: filter banks, frames, tight, fusion, erasures, polyphas

    Phase Retrieval for Sparse Signals: Uniqueness Conditions

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    In a variety of fields, in particular those involving imaging and optics, we often measure signals whose phase is missing or has been irremediably distorted. Phase retrieval attempts the recovery of the phase information of a signal from the magnitude of its Fourier transform to enable the reconstruction of the original signal. A fundamental question then is: "Under which conditions can we uniquely recover the signal of interest from its measured magnitudes?" In this paper, we assume the measured signal to be sparse. This is a natural assumption in many applications, such as X-ray crystallography, speckle imaging and blind channel estimation. In this work, we derive a sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the solution of the phase retrieval (PR) problem for both discrete and continuous domains, and for one and multi-dimensional domains. More precisely, we show that there is a strong connection between PR and the turnpike problem, a classic combinatorial problem. We also prove that the existence of collisions in the autocorrelation function of the signal may preclude the uniqueness of the solution of PR. Then, assuming the absence of collisions, we prove that the solution is almost surely unique on 1-dimensional domains. Finally, we extend this result to multi-dimensional signals by solving a set of 1-dimensional problems. We show that the solution of the multi-dimensional problem is unique when the autocorrelation function has no collisions, significantly improving upon a previously known result.Comment: submitted to IEEE TI

    Introduction to frames

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    This survey gives an introduction to redundant signal representations called frames. These representations have recently emerged as yet another powerful tool in the signal processing toolbox and have become popular through use in numerous applications. Our aim is to familiarize a general audience with the area, while at the same time giving a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art

    Pruned Continuous Haar Transform of 2D Polygonal Patterns with Application to VLSI Layouts

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    We introduce an algorithm for the efficient computation of the continuous Haar transform of 2D patterns that can be described by polygons. These patterns are ubiquitous in VLSI processes where they are used to describe design and mask layouts. There speed is of paramount importance due to the magnitude of the problems to be solved and hence very fast algorithms are needed. We show that by techniques borrowed from computational geometry we are not only able to compute the continuous Haar transform directly, but also to do it quickly. This is achieved by massively pruning the transform tree and thus dramatically decreasing the computational load when the number of vertices is small, as is the case for VLSI layouts. We call this new algorithm the pruned continuous Haar transform. We implement this algorithm and show that for patterns found in VLSI layouts the proposed algorithm was in the worst case as fast as its discrete counterpart and up to 12 times faster

    Near-optimal thermal monitoring framework for many-core systems on chip

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    Chip designers place on-chip thermal sensors to measure local temperatures, thus preventing thermal runaway situations in many-core processing architectures. However, the quality of the thermal reconstruction is directly dependent on the number of placed sensors, which should be minimized, while guaranteeing full detection of all the worst case temperature gradient. In this paper, we present an entire framework for the thermal management of complex many-core architectures, such that we can precisely recover the thermal distribution from a minimal number of sensors. The proposed sensor placement algo- rithm is guaranteed to reduce the impact of noisy measurements on the reconstructed thermal distribution. We achieve significant improvements compared to the state of the art, in terms of both computational complexity and reconstruction precision. For example, if we consider a 64 cores SoC with 64 noisy sensors (σ^2 = 4), we achieve an average reconstruction error of 1.5C, that is less than the half of what previous state-of-the-art methods achieve. We also study the practical limits of the proposed method and show that we do not need realistic workloads to learn the model and efficiently place the sensors. In fact, we show that the reconstruction error is not significantly increased if we randomly generate the power-traces of the components or if we have just a part of the correct workload

    Super Resolution Phase Retrieval for Sparse Signals

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    In a variety of fields, in particular those involving imaging and optics, we often measure signals whose phase is missing or has been irremediably distorted. Phase retrieval attempts to recover the phase information of a signal from the magnitude of its Fourier transform to enable the reconstruction of the original signal. Solving the phase retrieval problem is equivalent to recovering a signal from its auto-correlation function. In this paper, we assume the original signal to be sparse; this is a natural assumption in many applications, such as X-ray crystallography, speckle imaging and blind channel estimation. We propose an algorithm that resolves the phase retrieval problem in three stages: i) we leverage the finite rate of innovation sampling theory to super-resolve the auto-correlation function from a limited number of samples, ii) we design a greedy algorithm that identifies the locations of a sparse solution given the super-resolved auto-correlation function, iii) we recover the amplitudes of the atoms given their locations and the measured auto-correlation function. Unlike traditional approaches that recover a discrete approximation of the underlying signal, our algorithm estimates the signal on a continuous domain, which makes it the first of its kind. Along with the algorithm, we derive its performance bound with a theoretical analysis and propose a set of enhancements to improve its computational complexity and noise resilience. Finally, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method via a comparison against Charge Flipping, a notable algorithm in crystallography

    A multiresolution approach to automated classification of protein subcellular location images

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    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>Fluorescence microscopy is widely used to determine the subcellular location of proteins. Efforts to determine location on a proteome-wide basis create a need for automated methods to analyze the resulting images. Over the past ten years, the feasibility of using machine learning methods to recognize all major subcellular location patterns has been convincingly demonstrated, using diverse feature sets and classifiers. On a well-studied data set of 2D HeLa single-cell images, the best performance to date, 91.5%, was obtained by including a set of multiresolution features. This demonstrates the value of multiresolution approaches to this important problem.</p> <p>Results</p> <p>We report here a novel approach for the classification of subcellular location patterns by classifying in multiresolution subspaces. Our system is able to work with any feature set and any classifier. It consists of multiresolution (MR) decomposition, followed by feature computation and classification in each MR subspace, yielding local decisions that are then combined into a global decision. With 26 texture features alone and a neural network classifier, we obtained an increase in accuracy on the 2D HeLa data set to 95.3%.</p> <p>Conclusion</p> <p>We demonstrate that the space-frequency localized information in the multiresolution subspaces adds significantly to the discriminative power of the system. Moreover, we show that a vastly reduced set of features is sufficient, consisting of our novel modified Haralick texture features. Our proposed system is general, allowing for any combinations of sets of features and any combination of classifiers.</p
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