9 research outputs found

    Enhancing Handbag Design Through Anti-Counterfeit Technology

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    In recent years, the presence of counterfeit goods has become a $600 billion global industry, encompassing markets ranging from designer luxury goods to pharmaceuticals. This paper identifies the threat that this increased counterfeit presence poses on the high-end handbag market. Increased counterfeit quality is significantly contributing to the deception of consumers when attempting to purchase authentic designer handbags. In response to this increased threat, numerous designer brands have begun to adopt anti-counterfeit technologies with both track-and-trace and authentication agendas, to enhance the security of their products against the counterfeit industry. Several variations of anti-counterfeit solutions exist, and this paper specifically examines the effectiveness of the security and authentication factors of hologram, digital watermark, and Radio Frequency Identification solutions within a designer handbag application. After careful analysis of the various anti-counterfeit solutions available in the contemporary market, this paper concludes that overt and covert combination technologies with a two-factor-authentication approach are the most effective in terms of security and authentication capabilities. In conjunction with an anti-counterfeit efficacy analysis, this paper proposes an anti-counterfeit technology adaptation with the aim of elevating both security and design aesthetic. Design that favors functionality has recently gained traction in the fashion industry and incorporating anti-counterfeit technology into handbag design in a visually enhancing manner is the ultimate method of furthering both form and function in a technologically advanced world.https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/uresposters/1282/thumbnail.jp

    Large expert-curated database for benchmarking document similarity detection in biomedical literature search

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    Document recommendation systems for locating relevant literature have mostly relied on methods developed a decade ago. This is largely due to the lack of a large offline gold-standard benchmark of relevant documents that cover a variety of research fields such that newly developed literature search techniques can be compared, improved and translated into practice. To overcome this bottleneck, we have established the RElevant LIterature SearcH consortium consisting of more than 1500 scientists from 84 countries, who have collectively annotated the relevance of over 180 000 PubMed-listed articles with regard to their respective seed (input) article/s. The majority of annotations were contributed by highly experienced, original authors of the seed articles. The collected data cover 76% of all unique PubMed Medical Subject Headings descriptors. No systematic biases were observed across different experience levels, research fields or time spent on annotations. More importantly, annotations of the same document pairs contributed by different scientists were highly concordant. We further show that the three representative baseline methods used to generate recommended articles for evaluation (Okapi Best Matching 25, Term Frequency-Inverse Document Frequency and PubMed Related Articles) had similar overall performances. Additionally, we found that these methods each tend to produce distinct collections of recommended articles, suggesting that a hybrid method may be required to completely capture all relevant articles. The established database server located at https://relishdb.ict.griffith.edu.au is freely available for the downloading of annotation data and the blind testing of new methods. We expect that this benchmark will be useful for stimulating the development of new powerful techniques for title and title/abstract-based search engines for relevant articles in biomedical research.Peer reviewe

    Chronic pesticide exposure elicits a subtle carry-over effect on the metabolome of Aurelia coerulea ephyrae

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    Chemical pollutants, such as pesticides, often leach into aquatic environments and impact non-target organisms. Marine invertebrates have complex life cycles with multiple life-history stages. Exposure to pesticides during one life-history stage potentially influences subsequent stages; a process known as a carry-over effect. Here, we investigated carry-over effects on the jellyfish Aurelia coerulea. We exposed polyps to individual and combined concentrations of atrazine (2.5 őľg/L) and chlorpyrifos (0.04 őľg/L) for four weeks, after which they were induced to strobilate. The resultant ephyrae were then redistributed and exposed to either the same conditions as their parent-polyps or to filtered seawater to track potential carry-over effects. The percentage of deformities, ephyrae size, pulsation and respiration rates, as well as the metabolic profile of the ephyrae, were measured. We detected a subtle carry-over effect in two metabolites, acetoacetate and glycerophosphocholine, which are precursors of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, important for energy metabolism and osmoregulation of the ephyrae. Although these carry-over effects were not reflected in the other response variables in the short-term, a persistent reduction of these two metabolites could have negative physiological consequences on A. coerulea jellyfish in the long-term. Our results highlight the importance of considering more than one life-history stage in ecotoxicology, and measuring a range of variables with different sensitivities to detect sub-lethal effects caused by anthropogenic stressors. Furthermore, since we identified few effects when using pesticides concentrations corresponding to Australian water quality guidelines, we suggest that future studies consider concentrations detected in the environment, which are higher than the water quality guidelines, to obtain a more realistic scenario by possible risk from pesticide exposure

    Large expert-curated database for benchmarking document similarity detection in biomedical literature search

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    Progression of Geographic Atrophy in Age-related Macular Degeneration