18 research outputs found

    Introductory Chemistry Assessment

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    Introductory Chemistry Assessment

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    Potential Chemopreventive Activity of a New Macrolide Antibiotic from a Marine-Derived Micromonospora sp.

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    Agents capable of inducing phase II enzymes such as quinone reductase 1 (QR1) are known to have the potential of mediating cancer chemopreventive activity. As part of a program to discover novel phase II enzyme-inducing molecules, we identified a marine-derived actinomycete strain (CNJ-878) that exhibited activity with cultured Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on this activity, a new macrolide, juvenimicin C (1), as well as 5-O-α-l-rhamnosyltylactone (2), were isolated from the culture broth of a Micromonospora sp. Compound 1 enhanced QR1 enzyme activity and glutathione levels by two-fold with CD values of 10.1 and 27.7 μM, respectively. In addition, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities were elevated. This is the first reported member of the macrolide class of antibiotics found to mediate these responses

    Secondary Metabolite Regulation And Drug-Lead Discovery From Aquatic Actinomycetes.

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    Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of natural products, drug discovery from the aquatic environment, and the development of Actinobacteria as a resource of drug-leads. Chapter 2 details one such effort that resulted in the isolation and structure elucidation of a novel macrolide marine natural product with potential chemopreventative bioactivity. Appendix I details the known molecules identified in the pursuit of novel natural products. As an alternative to the traditional drug discovery approach and in order to access secondary metabolites that are not normally expressed under laboratory conditions, we attempted to induce the expression of silent biosynthetic gene clusters via microbial co-culture; this is discussed in Chapter 3. The results presented have implications toward improving the drug discovery process by suggesting that it is possible to mine existing strain libraries for new natural products in a phylum specific manner. Lastly, Chapter 4 contains concluding remarks and future directions of the field of natural products

    What\u27s My Research? with Skylar Carlson and Eric Dudley

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    Please join us on January 18th from noon to 1 pm in the Yosemite Classroom (1st floor of the Library) for “What’s My Research?” featuring Drs. Skylar Carlson (Chemistry) and Eric Dudley (Conservatory). Dr. Carlson will speak on understanding the role molecules play in nature. Through teamwork and undergraduate research, her team screens natural products for molecules with biological activity, looking for anticancer, antibiotic, or other activity. Dr. Dudley will speak (and possibly sing) on poly-stylistic practices in singing and the exploration of new musical works at the boundaries of genre, including some work that was nominated recently for a Grammy. A light lunch will be served

    What\u27s My Research? with Skylar Carlson and Eric Dudley

    No full text
    Please join us on January 18th from noon to 1 pm in the Yosemite Classroom (1st floor of the Library) for “What’s My Research?” featuring Drs. Skylar Carlson (Chemistry) and Eric Dudley (Conservatory). Dr. Carlson will speak on understanding the role molecules play in nature. Through teamwork and undergraduate research, her team screens natural products for molecules with biological activity, looking for anticancer, antibiotic, or other activity. Dr. Dudley will speak (and possibly sing) on poly-stylistic practices in singing and the exploration of new musical works at the boundaries of genre, including some work that was nominated recently for a Grammy. A light lunch will be served

    Structure Identification in Complex Mixtures Following Bacterial Settlement Bioactivity via MADByTE NMR-metabolomics Platform

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    Caulerpa spp. are invasive algae that grows in highly competitive tropical and temperate coastal waters that produce many bioactive secondary metabolites. Preliminary data suggests the algal microbiomes of Caulerpa spp. collected in the Florida Keys are chemically mediated

    Structure Identification in Complex Mixtures Following Bacterial Settlement Bioactivity via MADByTE NMR-metabolomics Platform

    No full text
    Caulerpa spp. are invasive algae that grows in highly competitive tropical and temperate coastal waters that produce many bioactive secondary metabolites. Preliminary data suggests the algal microbiomes of Caulerpa spp. collected in the Florida Keys are chemically mediated

    Phylum-Specific Regulation of Resistomycin Production in a <i>Streptomyces</i> sp. via Microbial Coculture

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    Actinomycete genomes are encoded with immense potential to produce secondary metabolites, however standard laboratory culture experiments rarely provide the conditions under which associated biosynthetic pathways are expressed. Despite years of research attempting to access these pathways and aside from a few well-studied bacterial quorum sensing systems, little is known about the specificity of secondary metabolite regulation in bacteria, such as the conditions under which a bacterium produces an antibiotic and the extent to which it does so in recognition of a particular species in the immediate environment. In the current study, we observed that the cocultivation of a <i>Streptomyces</i> sp. (strain B033) with four pathogenic strains of the phylum Proteobacteria resulted in the production of the antibiotic resistomycin. After further coculture experiments, we determined that Proteobacteria induced the production of resistomycin in B033 at significantly higher rates (65%) than strains from the phyla Firmicutes (5.9%) and Actinobacteria (9.1%), supporting that the regulation of secondary metabolism in bacteria can be dependent on the species present in the immediate environment. These results suggest a lack of promiscuity of antibiotic biosynthetic pathway regulation and indicate that it is feasible to mine existing microbial strain libraries for antibiotics in a phylum-specific manner

    Potential Chemopreventive Activity of a New Macrolide Antibiotic from a Marine-Derived Micromonospora sp.

    Get PDF
    Agents capable of inducing phase II enzymes such as quinone reductase 1 (QR1) are known to have the potential of mediating cancer chemopreventive activity. As part of a program to discover novel phase II enzyme-inducing molecules, we identified a marine-derived actinomycete strain (CNJ-878) that exhibited activity with cultured Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on this activity, a new macrolide, juvenimicin C (1), as well as 5-O-α-l-rhamnosyltylactone (2), were isolated from the culture broth of a Micromonospora sp. Compound 1 enhanced QR1 enzyme activity and glutathione levels by two-fold with CD values of 10.1 and 27.7 μM, respectively. In addition, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities were elevated. This is the first reported member of the macrolide class of antibiotics found to mediate these responses
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