9 research outputs found

    Redundancy Scheduling with Locally Stable Compatibility Graphs

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    Redundancy scheduling is a popular concept to improve performance in parallel-server systems. In the baseline scenario any job can be handled equally well by any server, and is replicated to a fixed number of servers selected uniformly at random. Quite often however, there may be heterogeneity in job characteristics or server capabilities, and jobs can only be replicated to specific servers because of affinity relations or compatibility constraints. In order to capture such situations, we consider a scenario where jobs of various types are replicated to different subsets of servers as prescribed by a general compatibility graph. We exploit a product-form stationary distribution and weak local stability conditions to establish a state space collapse in heavy traffic. In this limiting regime, the parallel-server system with graph-based redundancy scheduling operates as a multi-class single-server system, achieving full resource pooling and exhibiting strong insensitivity to the underlying compatibility constraints.Comment: 28 pages, 4 figure

    Power-of-two sampling in redundancy systems:The impact of assignment constraints

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    A classical sampling strategy for load balancing policies is power-of-two, where any server pair is sampled with equal probability. This does not cover practical settings with assignment constraints which force non-uniform sampling. While intuition suggests that non-uniform sampling adversely impacts performance, this was only supported through simulations, and rigorous statements have remained elusive. Building on product-form distributions for redundancy systems, we prove the stochastic dominance of uniform sampling for a four-server system as well as arbitrary-size systems in light traffic.</p

    Heavy-traffic universality of redundancy systems with assignment constraints

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    Service systems often face task-server assignment-constraints due to skill-based routing or geographical conditions. Redundancy scheduling responds to this limited flexibility by replicating tasks to specific servers in agreement with these assignment constraints. We gain insight from product-form stationary distributions and weak local stability conditions to establish a state space collapse in heavy traffic. In this limiting regime, the parallel-server system with redundancy scheduling operates as a multi-class single-server system, achieving full resource pooling and exhibiting strong insensitivity to the underlying assignment constraints. In particular, the performance of a fully flexible (unconstrained) system can be matched even with rather strict assignment constraints

    Heavy-traffic universality of redundancy systems with assignment constraints

    No full text
    Service systems often face task-server assignment-constraints due to skill-based routing or geographical conditions. Redundancy scheduling responds to this limited flexibility by replicating tasks to specific servers in agreement with these assignment constraints. We gain insight from product-form stationary distributions and weak local stability conditions to establish a state space collapse in heavy traffic. In this limiting regime, the parallel-server system with redundancy scheduling operates as a multi-class single-server system, achieving full resource pooling and exhibiting strong insensitivity to the underlying assignment constraints. In particular, the performance of a fully flexible (unconstrained) system can be matched even with rather strict assignment constraints

    Job assignment in large-scale service systems with affinity relations

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    We consider load balancing in service systems with affinity relations between jobs and servers. Specifically, an arriving job can be assigned to a fast, primary server from a particular selection associated with this job or to a secondary server to be processed at a slower rate. Such job–server affinity relations can model network topologies based on geographical proximity, or data locality in cloud scenarios. We introduce load balancing schemes that assign jobs to primary servers if available, and otherwise to secondary servers. A novel coupling construction is developed to obtain stability conditions and performance bounds. We also conduct a fluid limit analysis for symmetric model instances, which reveals a delicate interplay between the model parameters and load balancing performance

    Job assignment in large-scale service systems with affinity relations

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    \u3cp\u3eWe consider load balancing in service systems with affinity relations between jobs and servers. Specifically, an arriving job can be assigned to a fast, primary server from a particular selection associated with this job or to a secondary server to be processed at a slower rate. Such job–server affinity relations can model network topologies based on geographical proximity, or data locality in cloud scenarios. We introduce load balancing schemes that assign jobs to primary servers if available, and otherwise to secondary servers. A novel coupling construction is developed to obtain stability conditions and performance bounds. We also conduct a fluid limit analysis for symmetric model instances, which reveals a delicate interplay between the model parameters and load balancing performance.\u3c/p\u3

    Finding induced subgraphs in scale-free inhomogeneous random graphs

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    We study the induced subgraph isomorphism problem on inhomogeneous random graphs with infinite variance power-law degrees. We provide a fast algorithm that determines for any connected graph H on k vertices if it exists as induced subgraph in a random graph with n vertices. By exploiting the scale-free graph structure, the algorithm runs in O(nk) time for small values of k. We test our algorithm on several real-world data sets
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