25 research outputs found

    VIP treatment prevents embryo resorption by modulating efferocytosis and activation profile of maternal macrophages in the CBAxDBA resorption prone model

    Get PDF
    Successful embryo implantation occurs followed by a local pro-inflammatory response subsequently shifted toward a tolerogenic one. VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) has embryotrofic, anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic effects. In this sense, we investigated whether the in vivo treatment with VIP contributes to an immunosuppressant local microenvironment associated with an improved pregnancy outcome in the CBA/J‚ÄČ√ó‚ÄČDBA/2 resorption prone model. Pregnancy induced the expression of VIP, VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the uterus from CBA/J‚ÄČ√ó‚ÄČDBA/2 mating females on day 8.5 of gestation compared with non-pregnant mice. VIP treatment (2‚ÄČnmol/mouse i.p.) on day 6.5 significantly increased the number of viable implantation sites and improved the asymmetric distribution of implanted embryos. This effect was accompanied by a decrease in RORő≥t and an increase in TGF-ő≤ and PPARő≥ expression at the implantation sites. Moreover, VIP modulated the maternal peritoneal macrophages efferocytosis ability, tested using latex beads-FITC or apoptotic thymocytes, displaying an increased frequency of IL-10-producer F4/80 cells while did not modulate TNF-őĪ and IL-12 secretion. The present data suggest that VIP treatment increases the number of viable embryos associated with an increase in the efferocytic ability of maternal macrophages which is related to an immunosuppressant microenvironment.Fil: Gallino, Lucila. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Hauk, Vanesa Cintia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Vermeulen, Elba Monica. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Instituto de Medicina Experimental. Academia Nacional de Medicina de Buenos Aires. Instituto de Medicina Experimental; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Ramhorst, Rosanna Elizabeth. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Trophoblast cells inhibit neutrophil extracellular trap formation and enhance apoptosis through vasoactive intestinal peptide-mediated pathways

    Get PDF
    STUDY QUESTION:Do human trophoblast cells modulate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and neutrophil apoptosis through mechanisms involving vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)?SUMMARY ANSWER:Trophoblast cells inhibited NET formation and ROS synthesis and enhanced neutrophil apoptosis through VIP-mediated pathways in a model of maternal-placental interaction.WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY:Immune homeostasis maintenance at the maternal-placental interface is mostly coordinated by trophoblast cells. Neutrophil activation and NET formation increases in pregnancies complicated by exacerbated pro-inflammatory responses. VIP has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant effects and is synthesized by trophoblast cells.STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION:This is a laboratory-based observational study that sampled circulating neutrophils from 50 healthy volunteers to explore their response in vitro to factors derived from human trophoblast cells.PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS:Peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and tested in vitro with first trimester trophoblast cell line (Swan-71 and HTR8) conditioned media (CM) or with VIP. The effect of VIP and trophoblast CM on NET formation was assessed by co-localization of elastase and DNA by confocal microscopy, DNA release and elastase activity measurement. Neutrophil apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry or fluorescence microscopy. ROS formation was assessed by flow cytometry with a fluorescent probe. VIP silencing was performed by siRNA transfection. For phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, autologous monocytes were sampled, and engulfment and cytokines were assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA.MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE:Trophoblast CM and 10 nM VIP promoted neutrophil deactivation by preventing phorbol myristate acetate-induced NET formation and ROS synthesis while they increased neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis and reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of lipopolysaccharide (all P < 0.05 versus control). The effects of trophoblast CM were prevented by a VIP antagonist or when VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells were used (P < 0.05 versus control). Neutrophils driven to apoptosis by trophoblast CM could be rapidly engulfed by monocytes without increasing IL-12 production.LARGE SCALE DATA:Not applicable.LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION:The mechanisms of neutrophil deactivation by trophoblast VIP are based on the results obtained with neutrophils drawn from peripheral blood of healthy individuals interacting with trophoblast cell lines in vitro. These studies were designed to investigate biological processes at the cellular and molecular level; therefore, they have the limitations of studies in vitro and it is not possible to ascertain if these mechanisms operate similarly in vivo. We tested 50 neutrophil samples from healthy volunteers that have a normal variability in their responses. Cell lines derived from human trophoblast were used, and we cannot rule out a differential behavior of trophoblast cells in contact with neutrophils in vivo.WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS:Results presented here are consistent with an active mechanism through which neutrophils in contact with trophoblast cells would be deactivated and silently cleared by decidual macrophages throughout pregnancy. They support a novel immunomodulatory role of trophoblast VIP on neutrophils at the placenta, providing new clues for pharmacological targeting of immune and trophoblast cells in pregnancy complications associated with exacerbated inflammation.Fil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Sabbione, Florencia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Medicina Experimental. Academia Nacional de Medicina de Buenos Aires. Instituto de Medicina Experimental; ArgentinaFil: Vota, Daiana Marina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Paparini, Daniel Esteban. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Ramhorst, Rosanna Elizabeth. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Trevani, Analía Silvina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Medicina Experimental. Academia Nacional de Medicina de Buenos Aires. Instituto de Medicina Experimental; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Química Biológica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Impacto de la infección por SARS-CoV-2 en el embarazo

    Get PDF
    La nueva enfermedad llamada COVID-19 (por coronavirus disease 2019) fue detectada por primera vez en diciembre de 2019 en Wuhan, China, y se esparci√≥ con rapidez hacia pr√°cticamente todo el mundo. El virus causante, SARS-CoV-2, da lugar a diversas manifestaciones cl√≠nicas que pueden ir desde muy leves, e incluso con presentaci√≥n asintom√°tica, hasta formas muy graves que pueden conducir a la muerte, en especial en los grupos con comorbilidades. Algunos de los s√≠ntomas m√°s frecuentes son fiebre, mialgias, tos seca y cansancio. Las formas graves se caracterizan por insuficiencia respiratoria severa, neumon√≠a, shock s√©ptico o disfunci√≥n multiorg√°nica. Hist√≥ricamente, las embarazadas han sido afectadas de forma m√°s severa frente a las infecciones respiratorias en comparaci√≥n con las mujeres de grupos etarios similares no embarazadas. Hasta la fecha, se ha observado que las embarazadas son m√°s propensas a padecer las formas m√°s graves de la enfermedad y se describieron diversas complicaciones en el embarazo de pacientes con COVID-19. A√ļn existe escasa informaci√≥n acerca del impacto de la enfermedad durante la gestaci√≥n. En este trabajo, se examinan diversos aspectos del embarazo afectado por el nuevo coronavirus y se resume la informaci√≥n acerca de las infecciones por SARS-CoV-2 en la placenta y la transmisi√≥n vertical. Tambi√©n se aborda la generaci√≥n de anticuerpos maternos y la posible protecci√≥n del beb√© por transferencia maternofetal e inmunizaci√≥n pasiva mediante la lactancia. Es crucial continuar investigando c√≥mo la COVID-19 durante el embarazo altera los riesgos de resultados adversos maternos y neonatales para poder tomar las medidas m√°s adecuadas.The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was first detected in December 2019 and became epidemic in Wuhan, China. COVID-19 has rapidly spread out in China and all over the world. COVID-19, caused by the new virus SARS-CoV-2, presents a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, from an asymptomatic disease to life threatening forms, especially in people that have different risk factors. Some of the most common symptoms are fever, muscle pain, dry cough and fatigue, whereas the severe presentation of COVID-19 can present acute respiratory failure, pneumonia, septic shock and/or multiorganic failure. Historically, pregnant women have been more severely affected by respiratory diseases in comparison with non-pregnant women of the same age. Up to this date, pregnant individuals are more likely to develop severe COVID-19 and a number of pregnancy complications have been observed in COVID-19 patients. To date, little is known about the impact of COVID-19 on pregnancy. In this review, we examine key aspects of pregnancy that are affected by COVID-19 and summarize the current literature on SARS-CoV-2 infection of the placenta and vertical transmission. Furthermore, we highlight recent studies exploring antibodies generation by natural infections or vaccination and the possible protection of the baby by materno-fetal transference and passive transfer through lactation. It‚Äôs essential to keep researching the possible effects of COVID-19 on maternal and fetal outcomes in order to take appropriate measures to ensure maternal and fetal health.Fil: Calo, Guillermina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Gori, Mar√≠a Soledad. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Schafir, Ana Laura. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Castagnola, Lara. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    VIP Promotes Recruitment of Tregs to the Uterine‚ÄďPlacental Interface During the Peri-Implantation Period to Sustain a Tolerogenic Microenvironment

    Get PDF
    Uterine receptivity and embryo implantation are two main processes that need a finely regulated balance between pro-inflammatory and tolerogenic mediators to allow a successful pregnancy. The neuroimmune peptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a key regulator, and it is involved in the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are crucial in both processes. Here, we analyzed the ability of endogenous and exogenous VIP to sustain a tolerogenic microenvironment during the peri-implantation period, particularly focusing on Treg recruitment. Wild-type (WT) and VIP-deficient mice [heterozygous (HT, +/‚ąí), knockout (KO, ‚ąí/‚ąí)], and FOXP3-knock-in-GFP mice either pregnant or in estrus were used. During the day of estrus, we found significant histological differences between the uterus of WT mice vs. VIP-deficient mice, with the latter exhibiting undetectable levels of FOXP3 expression, decreased expression of interleukin (IL)-10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)c, and increased gene expression of the Th17 proinflammatory transcription factor RORő≥t. To study the implantation window, we mated WT and VIP (+/‚ąí) females with WT males and observed altered FOXP3, VEGFc, IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)ő≤ gene expression at the implantation sites at day 5.5 (d5.5), demonstrating a more inflammatory environment in VIP (+/‚ąí) vs. VIP (+/+) females. A similar molecular profile was observed at implantation sites of WT √ó WT mice treated with VIP antagonist at d3.5. We then examined the ability GFP-sorted CD4+ cells from FOXP3-GFP females to migrate toward conditioned media (CM) obtained from d5.5 implantation sites cultured in the absence/presence of VIP or VIP antagonist. VIP treatment increased CD4+FOXP3+ and decreased CD4+ total cell migration towards implantation sites, and VIP antagonist prevented these effects. Finally, we performed adoptive cell transfer of Tregs (sorted from FOXP3-GFP females) in VIP-deficient-mice, and we observed that FOXP3-GFP cells were mainly recruited into the uterus/implantation sites compared to all other tested tissues. In addition, after Treg transfer, we found an increase in IL-10 expression and VEGFc in HT females and allowed embryo implantation in KO females. In conclusion, VIP contributes to a local tolerogenic response necessary for successful pregnancy, preventing the development of a hostile uterine microenvironment for implantation by the selective recruitment of Tregs during the peri-implantation period.Fil: Gallino, Lucila. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Hauk, Vanesa Cintia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Fern√°ndez, Laura. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Soczewski, Elizabeth Victoria. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Gori, Mar√≠a Soledad. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Saraco, Nora Isabel. Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires. Hospital de Pediatr√≠a "Juan P. Garrahan". Servicio de Endocrinolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Berensztein, Esperanza Beatriz. Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires. Hospital de Pediatr√≠a "Juan P. Garrahan"; ArgentinaFil: Waschek, James A.. University of California at Los Angeles; Estados UnidosFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Ramhorst, Rosanna Elizabeth. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Understanding the natural selection of human embryos: Blastocyst quality modulates the inflammatory response during the peri-implantation period

    Get PDF
    Problem: Decidualized cells display an active role during embryo implantation sensing blastocyst quality, allowing the implantation of normal developed blastocysts and preventing the invasion of impaired developed ones. Here, we characterized the immune microenvironment generated by decidualized cells in response to soluble factors secreted by blastocysts that shape the receptive milieu. Method of Study: We used an in vitro model of decidualization based on the Human Endometrial Stromal Cells line (HESC) differentiated with medroxiprogesterone and dibutyryl-cAMP, then treated with human blastocysts-conditioned media (BCM) classified according to their quality. Results: Decidualized cells treated with BCM from impaired developed blastocysts increased IL-1ő≤ production. Next, we evaluated the ability of decidualized cells to modulate other mediators associated with menstruation as chemokines. Decidualized cells responded to stimulation with BCM from impaired developed blastocysts increasing CXCL12 expression and CXCL8 secretion. The modulation of these markers was associated with the recruitment and activation of neutrophils, while regulatory T cells recruitment was restrained. These changes were not observed in the presence of BCM from normal developed blastocysts. Conclusion: Soluble factors released by impaired developed blastocysts induce an exacerbated inflammatory response associated with neutrophils recruitment and activation, providing new clues to understand the molecular basis of the embryo-endometrial dialogue.Fil: Fern√°ndez, Laura del Carmen. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Soczewski, Elizabeth Victoria. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Gori, Mar√≠a Soledad. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Hauk, Vanesa Cintia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Sabbione, Florencia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Gallino, Lucila. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Mart√≠nez, Gustavo. No especif√≠ca;Fil: Irigoyen, Marcela. No especif√≠ca;Fil: Bestach, Yesica Soledad. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Ramhorst, Rosanna Elizabeth. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Placental extracellular vesicles: their potential as biomarkers of gestational complications

    Get PDF
    Las ves√≠culas extracelulares son importantes mediadores de la comunicaci√≥n intercelular. Durante la gestaci√≥n,diversos tipos celulares placentarios como no placentariossecretan ves√≠culas extracelulares a la circulaci√≥n. Se ha demostrado que las c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas liberan permanentemente a la circulaci√≥n materna ves√≠culas extracelularescargadas con diversas mol√©culas que modulan la funci√≥n delas c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas, inmunes y vasculares, entre otras.Las complicaciones gestacionales que afectan la placentaci√≥n, como la restricci√≥n del crecimiento intrauterino(RCIU) y la preeclampsia (PE), son un problema de saludp√ļblica mundial, ya que son condiciones que contribuyen,en alto grado, a la morbimortalidad materna y neonatal.Hasta ahora, no se dispone de pruebas cl√≠nicas quepermitan anticipar el diagn√≥stico y/o proveer indicadorespredictivos para identificar a las madres con mayor riesgode desarrollar estas complicaciones. En los √ļltimos a√Īos,se ha demostrado el potencial de las ves√≠culas extracelulares y su contenido como potenciales biomarcadoresde distintas patolog√≠as, por lo que su aplicaci√≥n despiertaespecial inter√©s en las complicaciones del embarazo.Extracellular vesicles are significant mediators of cellto-cell communication. During pregnancy, placental and non-placental cell types release extracellular vesicles into circulation. Is has been demonstrated that trophoblast cells are continuously releasing vesicles loaded with factors modulating trophoblast, immune and vascular functions. Gestational complications associated to impaired placentation, such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preeclampsia (PE), are a global public health problem since they are major contributors to maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are no clinical tests that allow early diagnosis and/or provide predictive markers to identify mothers at higher risk of developing these complications. The potential of extracellular vesicles and their content as biomarkers for different pathologies has been demonstrated. For this reason nowadays their application in gestational complications is of special interest.Fil: Lara, Brenda Ayelen. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Merech, F√°tima Isabel. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Vota, Daiana Marina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Soczewski, Elizabeth Victoria. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Hauk, Vanesa Cintia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Placental extracellular vesicles: their potential as biomarkers of gestational complications

    Get PDF
    Las ves√≠culas extracelulares son importantes mediadores de la comunicaci√≥n intercelular. Durante la gestaci√≥n,diversos tipos celulares placentarios como no placentariossecretan ves√≠culas extracelulares a la circulaci√≥n. Se ha demostrado que las c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas liberan permanentemente a la circulaci√≥n materna ves√≠culas extracelularescargadas con diversas mol√©culas que modulan la funci√≥n delas c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas, inmunes y vasculares, entre otras.Las complicaciones gestacionales que afectan la placentaci√≥n, como la restricci√≥n del crecimiento intrauterino(RCIU) y la preeclampsia (PE), son un problema de saludp√ļblica mundial, ya que son condiciones que contribuyen,en alto grado, a la morbimortalidad materna y neonatal.Hasta ahora, no se dispone de pruebas cl√≠nicas quepermitan anticipar el diagn√≥stico y/o proveer indicadorespredictivos para identificar a las madres con mayor riesgode desarrollar estas complicaciones. En los √ļltimos a√Īos,se ha demostrado el potencial de las ves√≠culas extracelulares y su contenido como potenciales biomarcadoresde distintas patolog√≠as, por lo que su aplicaci√≥n despiertaespecial inter√©s en las complicaciones del embarazo.Extracellular vesicles are significant mediators of cellto-cell communication. During pregnancy, placental and non-placental cell types release extracellular vesicles into circulation. Is has been demonstrated that trophoblast cells are continuously releasing vesicles loaded with factors modulating trophoblast, immune and vascular functions. Gestational complications associated to impaired placentation, such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preeclampsia (PE), are a global public health problem since they are major contributors to maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are no clinical tests that allow early diagnosis and/or provide predictive markers to identify mothers at higher risk of developing these complications. The potential of extracellular vesicles and their content as biomarkers for different pathologies has been demonstrated. For this reason nowadays their application in gestational complications is of special interest.Fil: Lara, Brenda Ayelen. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Merech, F√°tima Isabel. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Vota, Daiana Marina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Soczewski, Elizabeth Victoria. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Hauk, Vanesa Cintia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Neutrophil’s role in gestation: modulatory effects of trophoblast cells and VIP

    No full text
    El mantenimiento de la homeostasis inmunol√≥gica durante el embarazo requiere m√ļltiples circuitos de regulaci√≥n a nivel local y sist√©mico que act√ļan en forma sincronizada desde el per√≠odo post-implantatorio hasta el parto. Diversas poblaciones de c√©lulas inmunes son reclutadas a la interfase materno-placentaria desde el inicio de la gestaci√≥n y su funci√≥n es modulada en gran medida por factores solubles y de contacto de las c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas. Desde el punto de vista inmunol√≥gico, el desarrollo del embarazo normal comprende tres fases caracterizadas por distintos microambientes o perfiles predominantes. Una primera etapa proinflamatoria, asociada a los procesos de implantaci√≥n y placentaci√≥n temprana. Esta etapa involucra la ruptura del epitelio uterino, la invasi√≥n del endometrio por el blastocisto y la remodelaci√≥n de los vasos maternos, necesaria para satisfacer la creciente demanda de ox√≠geno y nutrientes. Esta respuesta inflamatoria inicial est√° estrictamente controlada para mantener la homeostasis a trav√©s de la activaci√≥n de respuestas antiinflamatorias y tolerog√©nicas. A continuaci√≥n, pasadas las 14 semanas, se inicia la segunda fase con un cambio de perfil hacia uno predominantemente antiinflamatorio requerido para el crecimiento fetal. Finalmente, una tercera etapa mucho m√°s corta en duraci√≥n, se caracteriza por una respuesta proinflamatoria asociada al desencadenamiento del parto.Distintos mediadores solubles como citoquinas, quimioquinas, factores de crecimiento y hormonas regulan estos cambios de perfil, actuando sobre m√ļltiples c√©lulas blanco entre las cuales los monocitos, macr√≥fagos, c√©lulas dendr√≠ticas y linfocitos T han sido extensamente estudiados. Entre los factores inmunomoduladores de s√≠ntesis local, es de particular inter√©s el p√©ptido intestinal vasoactivo (VIP), un p√©ptido pleiotr√≥pico que es sintetizado por c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas, entre otras c√©lulas de la interfase materno-placentaria.El objetivo de la presente tesis es investigar mecanismos celulares y moleculares que condicionan el fenotipo de los neutr√≥filos y su interacci√≥n con c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas con especial foco en la participaci√≥n del sistema VIP y sus receptores VPAC.Para abordar este objetivo se emplearon dos dise√Īos principales, por un lado dise√Īos in vitro con c√©lulas humanas utilizando neutr√≥filos y monocitos de dadores sanos y l√≠neas celulares derivadas de trofoblasto humano de primer trimestre (Swan-71 y HTR8-SVneo). Por otro lado, para profundizar en los efectos de VIP y sus receptores, se emplearon dos cepas de rat√≥n gen√©ticamente modificadas que no expresan los receptores VPAC1 o VPAC2 de dicho p√©ptido.En primer lugar, demostramos que los neutr√≥filos humanos expresan ARN mensajero de los dos receptores VPAC1 y VPAC2. Observamos que el VIP y los medios condicionados de c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas (MC) inhiben la formaci√≥n de trampas extracelulares de neutr√≥filos (NETs) inducidas por el forbol miristato acetato (PMA), con disminuci√≥n en la liberaci√≥n de ADN y elastasa. Esta disminuci√≥n en la NETosis es acompa√Īada por un aumento de la apoptosis. M√°s a√ļn, vimos que el VIP y los MC inhiben la liberaci√≥n de mieloperoxidasa inducida por PMA. Hallamos que el VIP y los MC de las dos l√≠neas trofobl√°sticas Swan-71 y HTR8 disminuyen la formaci√≥n de especies reactivas de ox√≠geno (ROS) inducida por el PMA. A su vez, los efectos inhibitorios de liberaci√≥n de ROS y ADN fueron prevenidos por un antagonista de receptores de VIP. Demostramos que tanto el VIP como los MC inhiben parcialmente la autofagia inducida por PMA. Por otra parte, el VIP y los MC aceleran la apoptosis espont√°nea de neutr√≥filos y revierten el efecto antiapopt√≥tico del LPS. En cuanto al papel del VIP trofobl√°stico, observamos que los MC de c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas deficientes en VIP no inducen el efecto proapopt√≥tico sobre los neutr√≥filos. Asimismo, se observ√≥ una mayor fagocitosis de neutr√≥filos apopt√≥ticos por monocitos cuando los primeros hab√≠an sido cultivados con MC, comparado con aquellos incubados en RPMI.En la segunda parte de la tesis, estudiando las cepas deficientes en los receptores VPAC1 y VPAC2, encontramos que las cruzas VPAC1 KO x VPAC1 KO tienen una menor cantidad de cr√≠as al nacer, y la cruza VPAC2 KO x VPAC2 KO presenta la misma tendencia. Tambi√©n vimos en ambas cepas una asimetr√≠a marcada en la distribuci√≥n de los sitios a lo largo del √ļtero. Estos sitios presentan una menor expresi√≥n del factor de crecimiento endotelial vascular (VEGF) en ambas cruzas y las c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas gigantes aisladas de los sitios tienen expresi√≥n alterada de factores relacionados con la angiog√©nesis: VEGF, angiopoyetina 1 y metaloproteinasa 9. Los sitios de implantaci√≥n tambi√©n presentan una alteraci√≥n en factores relacionados a la regulaci√≥n de la respuesta inmune como la prote√≠na quimioatrayente de monocitos 1, el marcador F4/80 y el factor plaquetario 4. Finalmente, al aislar neutr√≥filos de hembras VPAC1 y VPAC2 knock out pre√Īadas observamos que tienen alterada su tasa de apoptosis y su capacidad de modular est√≠mulos activadores como el PMA. Los macr√≥fagos tambi√©n presentan diferencias en su perfil. Concluimos que factores liberados por las c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas inhiben la activaci√≥n de los neutr√≥filos y promueven su apoptosis. Los resultados indican que, entre dichos factores, el VIP liberado por las c√©lulas trofobl√°sticas tiene un papel relevante y que otros factores producidos por estas c√©lulas a trav√©s de mecanismos mediados por el VIP end√≥geno, tambi√©n contribuyen a la desactivaci√≥n.Homeostasis maintenance during pregnancy requires multiple regulation circuits that act in a synchronized way at both local and systemic levels from the post-implantatory period until delivery. Different immune cell populations are recruited to the maternal-placental interface from the beginning of gestation and their function is regulated by trophoblast cells through contact and soluble factors. From an immunological point of view, normal pregnancy involves three immune stages characterized by different microenvironments or predominant cell profiles. A first pro-inflammatory stage, associated with the implantation process and early placentation. This process involves rupture of the epithelial lining, endometrial invasion and remodeling of maternal vessels that will support the new oxygen and nutrients demand. This initial inflammatory response is strictly controlled to maintain homeostasis through activation of anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic responses. Then, after 14 weeks of pregnancy, the second stage initiates with a profile switch towards an anti-inflammatory one, required for fetal growth. Finally, there is a short stage associated with labor, characterized by a pro-inflammatory response. Different soluble mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and hormones modulate the mentioned profile changes, acting on multiple target cells; some of which have been extensively studied like monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells. The aim of this thesis is to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms that condition the phenotype of neutrophils and their interaction with trophoblast cells with special focus on VIP and its receptors VPAC. To address this objective, two models were used. On the one hand, in vitro models with human cells using neutrophils and monocytes from healthy donors and trophoblast cell lines (Swan-71 and HTR8-SVneo). On the other hand, in order to deepen VIP‚Äôs effects and its receptors, two mice strains that do not express the receptors VPAC1 or VPAC2 were used. Firstly, we found that neutrophils express messenger RNA of the two receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2. We observed that VIP and conditioned media from trophoblast cells (CM) inhibit phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation, with a diminished release of DNA and elastase. This diminished NETosis is accompanied by an increase in neutrophil apoptosis rate. Moreover, we found that VIP and CM impair PMA-induced myeloperoxidase release. We demonstrated that VIP and CM of the two trophoblast cell lines Swan-71 and HTR8 inhibit reactive oxygen species formation (ROS) induced by PMA. Even more, the inhibitory effects in ROS formation and DNA were prevented when a VIP receptor antagonist was used. We demonstrated that both VIP and CM partially inhibit PMA-induced autophagy in neutrophils. Furthermore, we found that VIP and CM accelerate spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis and reverse the anti-apoptotic effect of LPS. As for the role of trophoblast VIP, we observed that conditioned media from VIP-deficient trophoblast cells fail to induce neutrophil apoptosis. Likewise, we found a higher phagocytosis rate of apoptotic neutrophils when they had been previously incubated with CM, compared to those incubated in RPMI alone. In the second part of the thesis, when we studied VPAC1 and VPAC2 deficient mice strains, we found that VPAC1 KO x VPAC1 KO mating have fewer pups and VPAC2 KO x VPAC2 KO mating presents the same tendency. We also observed a marked asymmetry in the sites distribution along the uterine horns. Moreover, implantation sites from both strains present a lower expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and isolated trophoblast giant cells from these sites also have an altered expression in angiogenesis related factors such as VEGF, angiopoietin 1 and metalloproteinase 9. Implantation sites also present alteration in different parameters related to immune regulation like monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, F4/80 marker and platelet factor 4. Finally, when we isolated neutrophils from VPAC1 and VPAC2 pregnant mice, we found that they have an altered apoptosis rate and ability to modulate activating stimulus like PMA. Macrophages also present differences in their profile. We conclude that factors released by trophoblast cells inhibit activation of neutrophils and promote their apoptosis. Results indicate that, amongst these factors, VIP released by trophoblast cells has a relevant role and that other factors produced by these cells also contribute to neutrophil deactivation, through mechanisms mediated by endogenous VIP.Fil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin

    Trophoblast cells primed with vasoactive intestinal peptide enhance monocyte migration and apoptotic cell clearance through őĪvő≤3 integrin portal formation in a model of maternal-placental interaction

    Get PDF
    STUDY HYPOTHESIS: Is apoptotic cell phagocytosis by monocytes modulated by pathways elicited by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) action on trophoblast? STUDY FINDING: Targeting trophoblast cells with VIP induces monocyte migration, polarization to anti-inflammatory phenotypes and apoptotic trophoblast cell clearance which involves increased őĪvő≤3 integrin expression on phagocytic cells and binding to thrombospondin 1. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Monocytes recruited to the maternal‚Äďplacental interface interact with trophoblast cells and differentiate to alternatively activated macrophages involved in the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an immunomodulatory polypeptide synthesized at the human placenta that can target both trophoblast cells and monocytes/macrophages. Integrin őĪvő≤3 and thrombospondin 1 are involved in the formation of a phagocytic portal for the immunosuppressant clearance of apoptotic cells. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS: This is a laboratory-based study studying monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy women (n = 33) and their interaction in vitro with first trimester trophoblast cell lines. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers by Percoll gradient and tested in co-culture settings with first trimester trophoblast cell lines (Swan 71 and HTR8) or with trophoblast cell conditioned media obtained in the presence or absence of 10 or 100 nM VIP. The effect of VIP-conditioned media on monocyte migration was assessed through transwell systems and monocyte/macrophage phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and the mechanisms involved in phagocytic portal formation were assessed by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, immunological blockade and RT‚ÄďPCR. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Exposing cells to 100 nM VIP increased the migration of monocytes toward trophoblast cell conditioned media (VIP conditioned medium) (P < 0.05 versus conditioned media from cells not exposed to VIP) and contributed to the monocytes acquiring an anti-inflammatory profile with increased CD39 and IL-10 expression (P < 0.05). Phagocytosis of apoptotic trophoblast cells by monocytes and monocyte-differentiated macrophages was increased by VIP conditioned medium (P < 0.05 versus media conditioned in the absence of VIP or direct addition of 100 nM VIP). The boosting effect of VIP conditioned medium on phagocytosis involved increased expression and re-localization of őĪvő≤3 integrin on phagocytic cells along with enhanced expression of thrombospondin 1 on trophoblast cells. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The conclusions are based on in vitro experiments with monocytes drawn from peripheral blood of healthy individuals and trophoblast cell lines and we were unable to ascertain that these mechanisms operate similarly in vivo. We cannot rule out a differential behavior of either trophoblast cells targeted in vivo with VIP, or primary cultures of first trimester trophoblast cells assayed in vitro. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: The results presented provide new clues for immune and trophoblast cell pharmacological targeting in pregnancy complications of immunopathologic nature.Fil: Grasso, Esteban Nicolas. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Vota, Daiana Marina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Hauk, Vanesa Cintia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Ramhorst, Rosanna Elizabeth. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Departamento de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica. Laboratorio de Inmunofarmacolog√≠a; Argentin

    Tissue Transglutaminase on Trophoblast Cells as a Possible Target of Autoantibodies Contributing to Pregnancy Complications in Celiac Patients

    Get PDF
    Problem: Women with celiac disease (CD) are often affected by atypical presentations of the disease associated with reproductive disorders as a main extra-digestive complaint. Here, we analyzed if autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in sera from CD patients with reproductive disorders could display direct effects through their interaction with tTG expressed on trophoblast cells and phagocytes inducing tissue damage and interfering in the clearance of trophoblast apoptotic bodies. Method of study: Sera from CD women with reproductive disorders were obtained, and their ability to induce apoptosis of Swan-71 (cytotrophoblast cell line) and to modulate the wound-healing and phagocytes process was tested. Results: Swan-71 cells expressed tTG and CD sera displayed a significant decrease in trophoblast cell migration and a delay in injury healing on trophoblast cells, compared with those observed with control sera. Moreover, CD sera significantly reduced trophoblast cell proliferation and increased apoptosis levels in comparison with those observed in the control sera. Finally, autoantibodies against tTG interfere in the clearance of trophoblast apoptotic bodies through a mechanism involving MFG-E8 (milk fat globulin-EGF factor 8)-tTG binding. Conclusion: The anti-tTG antibodies might contribute to trophoblast damage and disrupt the phagocytosis process of apoptotic bodies that could promote a pro-inflammatory microenvironment.Fil: S√≥√Īora, Cecilia. Universidad de la Rep√ļblica. Facultad de Ciencias; UruguayFil: Calo, Guillermina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Perez Leiros, Claudia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; ArgentinaFil: Hern√°ndez, Ana. Universidad de la Rep√ļblica. Facultad de Ciencias; UruguayFil: Ramhorst, Rosanna Elizabeth. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient√≠ficas y T√©cnicas. Oficina de Coordinaci√≥n Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Instituto de Qu√≠mica Biol√≥gica de la Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales; Argentin
    corecore