521 research outputs found

    More Catholic than the Pope: An Analysis of Polish Devotion to the Catholic Church under Communism

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    Poland is home to arguably the most loyal and devout Catholics in Europe. A brief examination of the country’s history indicates that Polish society has been subjected to a variety of politically, religiously, and socially oppressive forces that have continually tested the strength of allegiance to the Catholic Church. Through the partition period, the Nazi and Soviet invasions during World War II, and the institution of communist power following the close of World War II, the Polish people met religious hostility that threatened to permanently sever Polish faith to the Catholic Church. However, despite attempts to break Polish allegiance to the Catholic Church, Polish faith did not diminish, and in the case of the communist era, it strengthened. This thesis will argue that Polish loyalty to the Catholic Church is a product of historical associations of Catholicism as a symbol of national identity in addition to the guidance and leadership provided by a number of prominent Polish Catholic officials. With these two factors, the Catholic Church in Poland was able to overcome ideological and logistical barriers placed by the communist regime in order to maintain feelings of hope and optimism among the Polish people

    This Other Eden: Exploring a Sense of Place in Twentieth-Century Reconstructions of Australian Childhoods

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    This thesis explores the sense of place formed during childhood, as remembered by adult Australians who reconstruct their youth through various forms of life writing. While Australian writers do utilize traditional tropes of Western autobiography, such as the mythology of Eden and the Wordsworthian image of the child communing with Nature, these themes are frequently transformed to meet a uniquely Australian context. Isolation and distance from Europe, and the apparent indifference of our landscape towards white settlement, have received much critical attention in Australian studies generally and, indeed, broadly influence the formation of children’s sense of place across the continent. However, writers are also concerned with the role of place on a more local level. Through a comparison of writing from Western Australia, Queensland and Victoria, this thesis explores regional landscape preoccupations that create an awareness of local identity, variously contributing to or frustrating the child’s sense of belonging. Western Australian writing is dominated by images of isolation, the fragility of white settlement in a dry land lacking fresh water, and a pervasive beach culture. A strong sense of the littoral pervades writing from this region. Queensland’s frontier mythology is of a different flavour: warm and tropical, nature here is exuberant, constantly threatening to overwhelm culture, already perceived as transient due to the flimsy aspect of the “Queenslander” house. Writing from Victoria, to some extent, tends to more closely follow English models, juxtaposing country and city environments, although there is a distinctly local flavour to many representations of urban Melbourne and its flat, grid-like organization. As Australian society becomes more concentrated on the coastal fringe, the beach is an increasingly significant environment. Though more prominent in writing from some regions than others, coastal imagery broadly reflects the modern Australian’s sense of inhabiting a liminal zone with negotiable boundaries

    Cytochrome P450 in GtoPdb v.2021.2

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    The cytochrome P450 enzyme superfamily (CYP), E.C. 1.14.-.-, are haem-containing monooxygenases with a vast range of both endogenous and exogenous substrates. These include sterols, fatty acids, eicosanoids, fat-soluble vitamins, hormones, pesticides and carcinogens as well as drugs. Listed below are the human enzymes, their relationship with rodent CYP enzyme activities is obscure in that the species orthologue may not metabolise the same substrates. Some of the CYP enzymes located in the liver are particularly important for drug metabolism, both hepatic and extrahepatic CYP enzymes also contribute to patho/physiological processes. Genetic variation of CYP isoforms is widespread and likely underlies a proportion of individual variation in drug disposition. The superfamily has the root symbol CYP, followed by a number to indicate the family, a capital letter for the subfamily with a numeral for the individual enzyme. Some CYP are able to metabolise multiple substrates, others are oligo- or mono- specific

    Cytochrome P450 (version 2019.4) in the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology Database

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    The cytochrome P450 enzyme family (CYP450), E.C. 1.14.-.-, were originally defined by their strong absorbance at 450 nm due to the reduced carbon monoxide-complexed haem component of the cytochromes. They are an extensive family of haem-containing monooxygenases with a huge range of both endogenous and exogenous substrates. These include sterols, fat-soluble vitamins, pesticides and carcinogens as well as drugs. The substrates of some orphan CYP are not known. Listed below are the human enzymes; their relationship with rodent CYP450 enzyme activities is obscure in that the species orthologue may not catalyse the metabolism of the same substrates. Although the majority of CYP450 enzyme activities are concentrated in the liver, the extrahepatic enzyme activities also contribute to patho/physiological processes. Genetic variation of CYP450 isoforms is widespread and likely underlies a significant proportion of the individual variation to drug administration

    Cytochrome P450 in GtoPdb v.2023.1

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    The cytochrome P450 enzyme superfamily (CYP), E.C. 1.14.-.-, are haem-containing monooxygenases with a vast range of both endogenous and exogenous substrates. These include sterols, fatty acids, eicosanoids, fat-soluble vitamins, hormones, pesticides and carcinogens as well as drugs. Listed below are the human enzymes, their relationship with rodent CYP enzyme activities is obscure in that the species orthologue may not metabolise the same substrates. Some of the CYP enzymes located in the liver are particularly important for drug metabolism, both hepatic and extrahepatic CYP enzymes also contribute to patho/physiological processes. Genetic variation of CYP isoforms is widespread and likely underlies a proportion of individual variation in drug disposition. The superfamily has the root symbol CYP, followed by a number to indicate the family, a capital letter for the subfamily with a numeral for the individual enzyme. Some CYP are able to metabolise multiple substrates, others are oligo- or mono- specific. CYP also catalyse diverse oxidation and reduction reactions. These include ring hydroxylation, N-oxidation, sulfoxidation, epoxidation, the dealkylation of N-, S- and O- moieties, desulfation, deamination, as well as reduction of azo, nitro and N-oxide groups

    Cytochrome P450 (version 2019.4) in the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology Database

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    The cytochrome P450 enzyme family (CYP450), E.C. 1.14.-.-, were originally defined by their strong absorbance at 450 nm due to the reduced carbon monoxide-complexed haem component of the cytochromes. They are an extensive family of haem-containing monooxygenases with a huge range of both endogenous and exogenous substrates. These include sterols, fat-soluble vitamins, pesticides and carcinogens as well as drugs. The substrates of some orphan CYP are not known. Listed below are the human enzymes; their relationship with rodent CYP450 enzyme activities is obscure in that the species orthologue may not catalyse the metabolism of the same substrates. Although the majority of CYP450 enzyme activities are concentrated in the liver, the extrahepatic enzyme activities also contribute to patho/physiological processes. Genetic variation of CYP450 isoforms is widespread and likely underlies a significant proportion of the individual variation to drug administration

    CYP2 family: physiological enzymes subset in GtoPdb v.2021.2

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    Compared to the other CYP2 family enzymes, this subset have physiological rather than drug metabolising enzyme activities

    Mobilizing diversity: transposable element insertions in genetic variation and disease

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    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a large fraction of mammalian genomes. A number of these elements are actively jumping in our genomes today. As a consequence, these insertions provide a source of genetic variation and, in rare cases, these events cause mutations that lead to disease. Yet, the extent to which these elements impact their host genomes is not completely understood. This review will summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying transposon regulation and the contribution of TE insertions to genetic diversity in the germline and in somatic cells. Finally, traditional methods and emerging technologies for identifying transposon insertions will be considered

    Materials of Lightweight Concrete Research

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    The objectives for this research project are to explore options for innovative and sustainable materials in lightweight concrete. Various materials including granite powder, hydrated lime, latex, and recycled glass beads will be used in the concrete testing for this project. The question the team wants to answer is how these additives affect the concrete’s mechanical properties. Weekly mix designs will be performed, and control cylinders will be compared to experimental cylinders. Compression and tensile testing will also be performed to further aid the research. The motivation for performing this research is to aid mix development for the University of Akron Concrete Canoe Team. From this study, the Concrete Canoe Team will have invaluable research that will allow them to make the best decisions regarding lightweight concrete materials

    Hydrocarbon incorporation into the salt marsh ecosystem from the West Falmouth oil spill

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    Originally issued as Reference No. 71-69, series later renamed WHOI-.The oil barge "Florida" ran aground just off Little Island, West Falmouth, Massachusetts on September 16, 1969. About 175,000 gallons of Number Two fuel oil leaked into Buzzards Bay and the adjacent Wild Harbor Marsh. This report presents the results of analyses done on marsh muds and organisms collected nearly a year after the spill. We studied the incorporation of polluting hydrocarbons into, and their movement through the marsh ecosystem. Analyses of surface muds agreed well with observations on plant growth. The dead areas were the most heavily polluted. A deep mud core in the dead area showed oil has penetrated to at least 70 cm. Virtually all the marsh organisms living in the contaminated area were affected by the oil at least to the extent that they accumulated oil hydrocarbons in their tissues. Our data suggest that two processes may occur as the oil passes through the marsh ecosystem. There may be a progressive loss in the straight chain hydrocarbons in relation to branched chain, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons. There also appears to be a selection for the higher boiling fractions of the contaminants higher up the food chain.Supported by the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Fish and Wildlife Service Grant No. 14-17-0007- 1128 (G) and The National Science Foundation Grant No. GA 28365
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