186 research outputs found

    Reaching out to culturally and linguistically diverse families: strategies and challenges reported by parent training and information center staff

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    Within special education policy and practice, parents are expected to advocate for their children to receive appropriate special education and related services. However, the majority of parents report feeling disempowered to advocate; families from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds may feel especially disempowered. Federally funded Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) exist in each state to empower historically underserved (including CLD) parents of children with disabilities. In this study, we examined how PTIs educate and empower CLD families through semi-structured interviews with 13 PTI staff members who work with CLD families across five states. The participants emphasized the importance of strategies such as conducting outreach in local communities and developing parent leaders among the CLD families they support. The findings also indicated that PTIs struggle with addressing external, systemic barriers which influence CLD families. Implications for research, policy, and practice are discussed.Accepted manuscrip

    Faculty Reflections

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    Using sport as a global change agent: The United Nations model of sport for development

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    Since 2001, the United Nations (UN) has used sport as a development tool through the United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace (UNOSDP). This paper examines the issues in the Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) movement that warranted the UN’s involvement and looks at how and why the UN uses sport. It will also offer recommendations on how it can continue to do so in a more sustainable way. Academics have struggled to find a way to measure the success of the SDP movement and the only evidence that exists that shows that sport is creating long-term positive change is anecdotal. This creates a problem as it is challenging to convince potential donors to financially support an initiative when there is no quantitative proof of success. Through the theoretical lens of institutional theory and resource dependence theory, this paper explores the current organizational structure of the UN’s involvement and propose a new organizational structure that will make the UNOSDP more financially sustainable

    On the quasi-steady state assumption applied to Michaelis-Menten and suicide substrate reactions with diffusion

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    We consider a recent extension to the validity of the quasi-steady-state assumption (QSSA) which includes the case where the ratio of the initial enzyme to substrate concentration is not necessarily small. We extend the analysis to include diffusion of substrate, in which case the initial enzyme to substrate ratio is spatially dependent and no longer constant. We show that the region in which the QSSA holds depends on the nature of the enzyme-substrate reaction: if the enzyme is inactivated by the substrate then the QSSA holds in a growing disc; if the enzyme is unchanged after reaction then the QSSA holds in a ring travelling through space

    Perspectives about adult sibling relationships: a dyadic analysis of siblings with and without intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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    Most siblings of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) report positive sibling relationships. However, extant research often only examines the perspective of the nondisabled sibling; it is unclear whether siblings with IDD report close sibling relationships. Thus, the aim of this study was to understand adult sibling relationships from the perspectives of both siblings with and without IDD. Using dyadic interviews, we examined the perspectives of eight adult sibling dyads. The study was conducted in the United States. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis and cross-case analysis to identify themes within and across dyads. Overall, siblings with and without IDD reported enjoying spending time with one another. However, siblings with and without Down syndrome (versus autism spectrum disorder) reported more reciprocal sibling relationships, more frequent contact, and a greater range of shared activities. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.Accepted manuscrip

    A Mathematical Model for the Effect of Domestic Animals on Human African Trypanosomiasis (Sleeping Sickness)

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    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a parasite infection that is spread by the bites of tsetse flies and it is almost 100% fatal if left untreated (World Health Organization, “Neglected”). Our hypothesis is that by adding domestic animals to areas where humans are found (villages and plantations), we can reduce the amount of biting on humans, and therefore reduce the rate at which humans become infected. Numerical simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that increasing the number of domestic animals (pigs in our model) slows down the spread of the disease in both humans and domestic animals

    Understanding decision making among individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) and their siblings

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    Many siblings anticipate fulfilling caregiving roles for their brothers and sisters with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Given these roles and the importance of supported decision-making, it is crucial to understand how individuals with IDD and their siblings make decisions. Using dyadic interviews, we examined the perspectives of nine sibling dyads (N = 18) about decision-making in relation to self-determination, independent living, and employment. The ages of participants ranged from 19 to 57. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis to identify themes. Decision-making was characterized by: parents and siblings primarily identifying courses of action; the probability of respective consequences based on the person-environment fit; and the role of the sibling in making the final decision. Characteristics related to the individual with IDD, the family, the sibling, and the environment impacted decision-making. Individuals with IDD were more likely to make their own decisions about leisure activities, however, siblings were more likely to make formal decisions for their brothers and sisters.Accepted manuscrip

    Understanding Attitudes Towards Interracial Relationships Among College Students

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    The number of interracial couples in the United States remains low in today’s society. This study uses qualitative interviews and quantitative survey data from Illinois Wesleyan students to investigate the motivations, perceptions, and experiences of those who are currently, or were previously, in an interracial relationship. I also explore the attitudes of those who have not dated interracially, and the media’s impact on perceptions of interracial couples. I find that those who dated interracially did not see race as a deciding factor, but instead focused on personality, cultural similarities and differences, and appearances. Many students saw religion, peer and family support, and socioeconomic status as factors that influence the likelihood of dating interracially. Contradictory statements were made on the portrayal of interracial couples in the media; however, most concluded that the media images are generally positive. Better understanding these perceptions among current college students may have implications for future trends

    Exploring Differential Opportunity among Inner City Black Men

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    Poster presentation abstract

    Mother Goddesses and Subversive Witches: Competing Narratives of Gender Essentialism, Heteronormativity, and Queerness in Wiccan Ritual and Theology

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    Wicca is typically recognized as a feminist and queer-friendly religion embraced by many women and LGBTQ+ people. While women are undoubtedly emphasized positively, however, I argue that much of the focus is in fact a form of benevolent sexism, coming out of an essentialist understanding of women’s nature being nurturing, intuitive, and emotional. The resulting heteronormativity and its procreative focus can create an exclusionary environment for gay men and women as well as for transgender and genderfluid or non-binary individuals. My research utilizes ethnographic participantobservation of a local Wiccan coven and semi-structured qualitative interviews with Wiccans and Pagans from across the United States and England in order to explore the consequences and limitations of emphasizing Wicca as a fertility religion, where women’s power is theoretically restricted to their potential for motherhood. In doing so, I am able to gauge Wiccan practitioners’ attitudes related to gender and sexuality and explore the ways in which Wiccans are modifying their practices in order to be more inclusive
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