37 research outputs found

    Youth studies, citizenship and transitions: towards a new research agenda

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    © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. A key goal in youth studies is to gain holistic understandings of what it means to be young. However, a significant impediment to achieving this has been the tendency of youth studies to develop along siloed and stratified subfields. In keeping with the goal of creating more productive dialogue between subfields in youth studies, this paper examines the intersections between research in youth citizenship and youth transitions to consider the fresh insights and cross fertilisations that such an analysis may yield. This examination reveals a sense of dissatisfaction in both subfields with traditional normative and linear models of citizenship and transitions which rely on step-wise and sequential notions of time. In response, the paper advances a new research agenda which posits more temporally, spatially and relationally-sensitive understandings of youth citizenship and transition. Drawing on Ingold (2007. Lines: A brief history. London: Routledge), this agenda proposes the use of three alternative metaphors–genealogical, wayfaring and threads–which could hold the potential to unsettle the normativity and linearity of previous youth transitions and citizenship frameworks, and thus provide deeper insights into what it means to live and to be young citizens in times of transition

    Border Spaces: Geographies of Youth Exclusion, Inclusion, and Liminality

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    Youth citizenship: Expanding conceptions of the young citizen

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    While the field of youth citizenship has grown rapidly in the past 2 decades, it still remains a contested idea—not least because of the ‘liminal’ or in-between status that young people occupy between childhood and adulthood. In this paper I propose a conceptual framing that sees youth citizenship at the intersection of youth becoming, being and doing. This framing recognises many of the tensions, complexities and ambiguities of being a young citizen, as well as the potential this holds for understanding the fullness and diversity of youth experiences of citizenship. The paper examines two emerging research streams where youth citizenship researchers illustrate the richness of this conceptual framing in the research fields of youth everyday lived citizenship and digital citizenshi

    Mind the Gap: Uneven and Unequal Experiences of Youth Citizenship

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    AbstractWhile the field of youth citizenship has grown in recent years, many ‘gaps’ still exist. This commentary paper takes a critical look at three of these gaps in youth citizenship studies, namely (i) the Global North/Global South gap in understandings about youth citizenship, (ii) the citizenship status and empowerment gap, and (iii) the citizenship opportunity and participation gap. The paper argues that unless these gaps are attended to, we have a distortion in what we know about youth citizenship as the understandings and young people profiled (predominantly the Global North, elite, White and well resourced) represent only a small subsection of the whole, thus ignoring the experiences, knowledge, stories and voices of many diverse young citizens

    Contours of contested curriculum

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    Fresh Perspectives on Children and Youth Citizenship

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    Global citizenship education: Definitions and debates

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    Navigating religious diversity: exploring young people’s lived religious citizenship in Indonesia

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    © 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Against the backdrop of several concerning reports which have noted growing socio-religious conservatism and intolerance amongst Indonesia youth, this study examined how school-aged Indonesian young people navigate encounters with religious difference in their everyday lives. Recognising the significance of religious and citizenship education curricula, the research included classroom observations and interviews with 20 religiously-diverse Indonesian young people in three purposively selected high schools in Jakarta. The paper reveals that participants in all three schools agreed that religious studies and their personal religious frameworks were central to their approaches toward religious tolerance. However, their lived everyday experiences of rubbing shoulders with religious ‘others’, expanded upon and critiqued the narrowness and rigidity of these frameworks and showed greater religious inclusivity. Through this analysis the paper integrates prior work on ‘lived religion’ and ‘lived citizenship’ to fuse a ‘lived religious citizenship’ concept, arguing that this adds depth to both fields by recognising that religion cannot be separated from the experience of being a citizen. A focus on lived religious citizenship provides a deeper account of individual identity and highlights the importance of qualitative studies focused on the living out of religion and citizenship
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