225 research outputs found

    Multiple Factors Affect Job Satisfaction of Hospital RNs

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    Highlights findings from an analysis of variables associated with job satisfaction levels of registered nurses working in hospitals, including health status, race/ethnicity, career orientation, working conditions, workload, and benefits

    Implications of the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program for Young Adults

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    On December 17, 1999, President Clinton signed the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act (P.L. 106-170) into law establishing in section 101(a) the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program (Ticket to Work Program) as well as several other provisions to support the movement of beneficiaries with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) into employment. The Ticket to Work Program was established to expand the universe of providers available to beneficiaries with disabilities as they are afforded the opportunity to choose from whom they access their needed employment services and supports. The Ticket to Work Program also increased provider incentives to serve these individuals. The Social Security Administration (SSA) administers this new program with the support of Maximus, Inc, the entity contracted with by the SSA to serve as the program manager. The SSA is currently contracting with agencies to serve as Employment Networks (EN). These ENs perform an array of duties under the law, including providing employment services, vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, and other support services to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain and maintain employment. Under this program, the SSA is directed to provide to beneficiaries with disabilities who meet certain eligibility criteria a Ticket they may use to obtain employment services, VR services and/or other support services from an EN of their choice. “A Ticket under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program is a document that provides evidence of SSA’s agreement to pay an EN or a State VR agency for providing employment services, VR services and/or other support services to a Ticket recipient who requests such services.” (SSA 2001, p. 12) The Ticket to Work Program will be phased in nationally over a three-year period beginning in January, 2002, with beneficiaries in 13 states: Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Vermont and Wisconsin. The remaining states will be included by January, 2004

    Where Is She?

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    Aware of the tradition of horizontal violence that divides women from each other and cognisant also of the dearth of female notions of divinity, majesty or even identity that exist within the Judaeo/christian tradition, which has had such a penetrating effect on social, cultural and religious 'truth-imperatives', I was curious about the statue that had effected such a profound impression on Luce Irigaray. I had searched, to no avail, within the Anglican traditions of both Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand for such a symbol. Consequently, in this paper I intend to explore the construction of the Virgin as she is re/presented by the Anglican Church. Using the deconstructive and reconstructive strategies of Helene Cixous I will analyse a fourteenth century altar piece of the Annunciation painted by Simone Martini, and then suggest how Mary can be used to affirm, rather than deny and oppress, the multiplicity of differences between women

    Parenting Styles, Educational Level Of Parents, And Social Competence In Preschool Aged Children

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    Research has indicated that social competence of preschool children is largely a function of parenting style. Studies have shown that authoritative parenting style, when compared to authoritarian and permissive parenting styles, is generally most effective in producing children who are socially mature and self-reliant. In addition, past research has indicated that the educational level achieved by the parent is a good predictor of the parent's tendency to be authoritarian with authoritarianism decreasing as the years of education of the parents increase

    Newly Licensed RNs Describe What They Like Best about Being a Nurse

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    About 25% of newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) leave their first job within two years, but only 2% leave the nursing profession in this same timeframe. Therefore, the researchers sought to discover what new nurses like best about being a nurse, in hopes of gaining information that might help facilities to reduce turnover rates. Data were collected between January and March 2009 from 1,152 NLRNs licensed in 15 US states. Krippendorff's method was used to analyze survey responses. Five themes emerged: “providing holistic patient care,” “having an autonomous and collaborative practice,” “using diverse knowledge and skills to impact patient outcomes,” “receiving recognition,” and “having a job that is secure and stimulating.” Strategies are discussed that organizations might employ in helping NLRNs to realize what they best like about their work, which might lead to improved retention rates

    The Harms of Screening: A Proposed Taxonomy and Application to Lung Cancer Screening

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    IMPORTANCE Making rational decisions about screening requires information about its harms, but high-quality evidence is often either not available or not used. One reason may be that we lack a coherent framework, a taxonomy, for conceptualizing and studying these harms. OBJECTIVE To create a taxonomy, we categorized harms from several sources: systematic reviews of screening, other published literature, and informal discussions with clinicians and patients. We used this information to develop an initial taxonomy and vetted it with local and national experts, making revisions as needed. RESULTS We propose a taxonomy with 4 domains of harm from screening: physical effects, psychological effects, financial strain, and opportunity costs. Harms can occur at any step of the screening cascade. We provide definitions for each harm domain and illustrate the taxonomy using the example of screening for lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The taxonomy provides a systematic way to conceptualize harms as experienced by patients. As shown in the lung cancer screening example, the taxonomy also makes clear where (which domains of harms and which parts of the screening cascade) we have useful information and where there are gaps in our knowledge. The taxonomy needs further testing and validation across a broad range of screening programs. We hope that further development of this taxonomy can improve our thinking about the harms of screening, thus informing our research, policy making, and decision making with patients about the wisdom of screening

    Creating an engaging science inquiry activity for middle school students that incorporates online remote access to analytical instrumentation

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    The decline in young peoples’ interest in science and technology education and the reduction in the proportion of students choosing to pursue careers in science and technology have been causing concern internationally for over a decade (OECD 2006). It is known that young people’s attitudes to science and technology are usually established early in life and that efforts to encourage interest and build awareness are best targeted toward middle school students (DeWitt, Archer and Osborne 2014; Riegle-Crumb, Moore and Ramos-Wada 2010). This context prompted three initiatives that came together to create the learning opportunity for middle school students evaluated in the pilot study described in this paper. In the context of their inquiry project, the Grade 8 class worked with science professionals to remotely use an instrument in the university chemistry lab to analyze river water samples for total nitrogen. A pilot study of the initiative that examined students’ responses to survey questions using the lens of productive disciplinary engagement (Engle and Conant 2002) indicated high levels of student engagement, specifically in the discipline of science, that were productive in advancing their learning of science and awareness of the actual practices that science professionals use. At the end of the paper, these findings are corroborated and expanded upon by the teacher in her reflections. Further work will look at how this productive disciplinary engagement develops, by analyzing video recordings of students, teachers and scientists interacting within this collaborative venture

    Bridging Physics and Biology Teaching through Modeling

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    As the frontiers of biology become increasingly interdisciplinary, the physics education community has engaged in ongoing efforts to make physics classes more relevant to life sciences majors. These efforts are complicated by the many apparent differences between these fields, including the types of systems that each studies, the behavior of those systems, the kinds of measurements that each makes, and the role of mathematics in each field. Nonetheless, physics and biology are both sciences that rely on observations and measurements to construct models of the natural world. In the present theoretical article, we propose that efforts to bridge the teaching of these two disciplines must emphasize shared scientific practices, particularly scientific modeling. We define modeling using language common to both disciplines and highlight how an understanding of the modeling process can help reconcile apparent differences between the teaching of physics and biology. We elaborate how models can be used for explanatory, predictive, and functional purposes and present common models from each discipline demonstrating key modeling principles. By framing interdisciplinary teaching in the context of modeling, we aim to bridge physics and biology teaching and to equip students with modeling competencies applicable across any scientific discipline.Comment: 10 pages, 2 figures, 3 table
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