51 research outputs found

    Implementing experiential learning activities in a large enrollment introductory food science and human nutrition course

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    Experiential learning activities are often viewed as impractical, and potentially unfeasible, instructional tools to employ in a large class. Research has shown, though, that the metacognitive skills that students utilize while participating in experiential learning activities enable students to assess their true level of understanding and mastery for the subject matter. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether students in a large (~660 person) Introduction to Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN 101) course improved their understanding of dietary intake and food safety after participating in two experiential learning activities developed for these course topics. The first activity, completed during class, asked students to select one day???s worth of food from a list of menu choices, calculate the nutritional value of their food choices, and then compare their daily nutritional intake to the dietary reference intakes for their gender, age category and health status. The second activity, completed via the course website, asked students to complete one food safety survey prior to the commencement of the course???s food microbiology section to assess the students' personal food safety behaviors and a second survey upon completion of the section to assess students' knowledge of recommended food safety practices. Students were asked to evaluate both the cognitive and affective aspects of the experiential learning activities by completing a reflective questionnaire after participating in each activity. Overall, students' responses revealed that the activities were effective learning tools and that the students liked engaging with the material on a personal application level. A Poster version of this article can be found in the IDEALS SoTL Presentations and Posters folder.published or submitted for publicationis peer reviewe

    Facilitating experiential learning in a large introductory food science course

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    Experiential learning activities are often viewed as impractical, and potentially unfeasible, instructional tools to employ in a large class. Research has shown, though, that the metacognitive skills that students utilize while participating in experiential learning activities enable students to assess their true level of understanding and mastery for the subject matter. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether students in a large (~660 person) Introduction to Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN 101) course improved their understanding of dietary intake and food safety after participating in two experiential learning activities developed for these course topics. The first activity, completed during class, asked students to select one day???s worth of food from a list of menu choices, calculate the nutritional value of their food choices, and then compare their daily nutritional intake to the dietary reference intakes for their gender, age category and health status. The second activity, completed via the course website, asked students to complete one food safety survey prior to the commencement of the course???s food microbiology section to assess the students' personal food safety behaviors and a second survey upon completion of the section to assess students' knowledge of recommended food safety practices. Students were asked to evaluate both the cognitive and affective aspects of the experiential learning activities by completing a reflective questionnaire after participating in each activity. Overall, students' responses revealed that the activities were effective learning tools and that the students liked engaging with the material on a personal application level. This poster was also presented at the 2007 NACTA Conference and published as a journal article in the Journal of Food Science Education.published or submitted for publicationis peer reviewe

    Determination of fluid-induced loads from strain gages: theory, equations, and error analysis

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    Strain gages are to be used on the LOFT piping to determine load resultants during the subcooled portion of blowdown in Loss-of-Coolant Experiments. This report discusses the configuration of strain gages to be installed. The selected configuration is shown to: be sufficient to determine the desired load resultants; provide for measurement redundancy; and provide an evaluation of the applicability of the analytical assumptions made in obtaining load resultants from the measured strains. Data reduction equations are derived and an error analysis is performed. Data obtained from an analytical model of a Loss-of-Coolant Experiment is analyzed, showing that the error bounds on the load resultants are less than 12 percent of the load, provided the analytical assumptions are not violated

    Characterization of a laser-nitrided titanium alloy by electron backscattered diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

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    After a laser gas nitriding treatment of the Ti-7.5Al (atom %) titanium-based alloy, we used a combination of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques in order to efficiently characterize the different phases in the resolidified layer. Representative measurements of chemical composition and reliable determination of crystal structure were possible for each phase of the complex microstructure. The reaction zone is formed by a mixture of isostructural TiN phases with dendritic and/or coarse needles morphology, fixed into a -Ti matrix (martensite) with a thin needle aspect. The nitrogen solubility was found to remain very low in the -Ti matrix (up to 2-3 atom %), while in the TiN phase, an aluminum solubility as high as 4 atom % was measured, reducing drastically the nitrogen content into a Ti79N17Al4 chemical composition. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
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