821 research outputs found

    Miss, what's my name? New teacher identity as a question of reciprocal ontological security

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    This paper extends the dialogue of educational philosophy to the experience of beginners entering the teaching profession. Rather than impose the ideas of any specific philosopher or theorist, or indeed official standard, the exploration presented here owes its origins to phenomenology and the use of grounded theory. Working from a narrative data base and focussing on the knowing of name in the first instance, the authors develop their emergent ideas on self and identity in relation to children taught, through connection to a wider literature that includes reference to Giddens, Illeris, Deleuze and Heidegger, for example. The paper is thus also an exercise in suggesting that research on practice by academics working in professional education, who are non-philosophers, can lead to constructive and relevant engagement with philosophy in developing theory from and about about practice, even though the approach, in the initial stages, may well be serendipitous and eclectic in nature

    Initial teacher education guideline for teacher educators in inquiry‚Äźbased science teaching

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    This guideline comprises a set of arguments in support of Inquiry‚Äźbased Science Teaching, supported by a number of references, apposite quotes and exploratory small‚Äźscale research. The intention is that the guideline will serve as a realistic pedagogy for beginning teachers of science in courses of Initial Teacher Education that, with some experience of teaching and support from tutors at school and university, it can help them to develop a disposition that favours opportunities for pupils to engage in inquiry in one way or another. The text of the guideline will also form the basis of a website that will have a range of links to, for example, video examples of inquiry in action, published papers from research, policy and practice and other sources of advice and ideas

    The indicators of pupil opinion and teacher interactivity for inquiry-based science teaching

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    In order to establish those practices which underpin a science teaching performance that combines pupil enthusiasm and creative classrooms, it will be necessary to uncover evidence of inquiry-based learning experiences in science that can provide a warrant for theory and practice that will assist new science teachers in recognising and developing opportunities for investigative activity. Remaining aware, however, of the recurring theme in contemporary educational research which suggests that learning to teach has an important affective dimension associated with developing relationships and the formation of a teaching identity ‚Äď a model of development which thus transcends atheoretical checklists of professional standards or pedagogical steps ‚Äď the nature of that evidence will necessarily be in the area of the formative development of new teachers‚Äô professional knowledge and understanding

    Becoming an effective science teacher at the Department of Curricular Studies, University of Strathclyde

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    In an article for the International section, Allan Blake, Colin Smith and Jim McNally from Strathclyde report on the start of a very important EU-funded project, involving 15 countries, which looks at how ‚Äėinquiry-based science‚Äô can be promoted in science teaching and the significance for teacher education. In their view, inquiry-based science is more about open-endedness and uncertainty of outcome than routine (prescribed) practical work. STE will keep track of this important project and we will report on its progress and outcomes in future issues

    Novices helped by tutors and teachers

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    A comment piece in The Times Educational Supplement Scotland on research undertaken by the authors into the perceptions of support received by students on initial teacher education school placements

    Finding an identity and meeting a standard : connecting the conflicting in teacher induction

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    This article has the apparently contradictory aims of describing a discourse of new teachers that is at odds with the policy-derived competence-based discourse of the professional standard for teachers, but of also seeking to find some points of connection that may help start a dialogue between policy and research. The experience of new teachers is conceptualized as personal stories of identity formation with a clear emotional-relational dimension and a sense of self and intrinsic purpose in which others, especially colleagues and children, are central - themes not visible in the standard. The empirical context is that of new teachers in Scotland but the argument is supported through a wider literature that extends beyond the traditional limits of teacher education, drawing on, for example, notions of self-identity, pure relationship and ontological security in the work of Giddens. Whether a more constructive dialogue can begin depends partly on the extent to which the formal standard can be expected to capture the complex, personal nature of the beginner's experience, and partly on the possibility of research identifying particular areas of competence, such as understanding difference, that connect in some way to the standard

    'The Work of Teacher Education' : Final Research Report

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    Partnership teacher education ‚Äď in which schools work with universities and colleges to train teachers ‚Äď works and there is abundant existing evidence in support of this fact. But our small-scale study across England and Scotland shows that it is the higher education tutor who seems to make it work, often at the cost of research-informed teaching and research. The most time-intensive activity for the higher education tutors in our sample was maintaining relationships with schools and between schools and individual trainee teachers. The need to maintain relationships to such a degree is caused in part by the creation of a marketplace of ‚Äėproviders‚Äô of teacher education who compete for funding on the basis of inspection and quality assurance data and also by the very early school placements that characterise the English model of initial teacher education in comparison to other European models such as that of Finland

    New teachers as learners : a model of early professional development

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    This project was designed to improve the learning of new teachers by developing a research-based, practical model of early professional learning. In addition to detailing the main part of the learning process that statutory standards neglect, the research implies that existing standards should be differentially weighted to reflect the multidimensional development process we have identified. In so doing, we have shown that it is possible to 'connect the conflicting' experience and standard through a more sophisticated recognition of early professional learning

    Promoting Inquiry in Science Classrooms in European Schools : a Handbook for Tutors

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    In Scotland, PISCES stands for Promoting Inquiry Skills for a Curriculum for Excellence in Science. It is a CPD module for teachers of science, which has been developed in Scotland with the support of the S-TEAM project. However, this Handbook uses our international acronym in which PISCES stands for Promoting Inquiry in Science Classrooms in European Schools . It is, we believe, potentially equally as successful across Europe as it was designed around the idea of empowering teachers to think for themselves how to make their practice more-inquiry based, wherever they are. It is recognised that some school, social, policy and cultural environments may be more supportive of the idea of ‚Äėmore inquiry-based practice‚Äô than others. PISCES empowers teachers to make small or large changes to their practice, according to those sorts of contextual factors, their own aims and how they perceive the needs of their pupils. You will note that we have been careful to use the word ‚Äėmore‚Äô in ‚Äėmore inquiry-based.‚Äô As befits the idea of empowerment to adapt to one‚Äôs own context, there is no single model of inquiry being ‚Äėpushed‚Äô here. Indeed, we count it as a measure of success of PISCES that the teachers who have participated did very different things in making their practice more inquiry-based. Strathclyde University is a leading partner in S-TEAM. Members of Strathclyde University, along with the Development Officer for Curriculum for Excellence for East Lothian, successfully developed and delivered a pilot version of PISCES as a module to a group of East Lothian teachers, in 2010/11. The module resulted in successful ‚Äėexperiments in practice‚Äô and increased awareness of the benefits of inquiry-based teaching and learning. The same group of teachers have also taken part in a follow-up course (ARIES: Advanced Resources for Inquiry and Evaluation in Science). PISCES is a high quality CPD programme, valued by teachers and supportive of their professional self-development. It can be applied to both primary and secondary teaching, in all science subjects. Pupils benefit from learning experiences, which develop scientific inquiry skills. Feedback from participating teachers has been consistently positive

    Promoting inquiry skills in Curriculum for Excellence in Science: conceptualising inquiry to improve practice

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    This paper describes a Scottish initiative (arising out of a EU funded development project) involving university researchers, a local authority curriculum development officer and a group of teachers interested in developing more inquiry based approaches in science education. The project is not one in which the researchers bring prescriptions from research. Rather, it is seen as a joint effort aimed at solving practitioners' conceptual and practice issues. The overall question for the teachers was, How do I (we) make our practice more inquiry based? The question for the researchers was, How do we help you (the interested science teachers) to make your practice more inquiry based? This has two sub-questions: How do we help you to conceptualise the issues? How do we help you to solve the practice problems? As it turned out, the particular group of teachers we worked with did not ask for help with practice issues, so we have not made much progress in answering the second question. Therefore, this paper will focus on the first. We seem to have been successful in helping the teachers to acquire some useful conceptual tools for thinking about and changing their practice in ways that they valued for themselves. Perhaps the answer to the second question is that researchers can help teachers to solve their practice problems by helping them to conceptualise the issues
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