2,659 research outputs found

    Analysis of general aviation single-pilot IFR incident data obtained from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System

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    An analysis of incident data obtained from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) has been made to determine the problem areas in general aviation single-pilot IFR (SPIFR) operations. The Aviation Safety Reporting System data base is a compilation of voluntary reports of incidents from any person who has observed or been involved in an occurrence which was believed to have posed a threat to flight safety. This paper examines only those reported incidents specifically related to general aviation single-pilot IFR operations. The frequency of occurrence of factors related to the incidents was the criterion used to define significant problem areas and, hence, to suggest where research is needed. The data was cataloged into one of five major problem areas: (1) controller judgment and response problems, (2) pilot judgment and response problems, (3) air traffic control (ATC) intrafacility and interfacility conflicts, (4) ATC and pilot communication problems, and (5) IFR-VFR conflicts. In addition, several points common to all or most of the problems were observed and reported. These included human error, communications, procedures and rules, and work load

    General aviation single pilot IFR autopilot study

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    Five levels of autopilot complexity were flown in a single engine IFR simulation for several different IFR terminal operations. A comparison was made of the five levels of complexity ranging from no autopilot to a fully coupled lateral and vertical guidance mode to determine the relative benefits versus complexity/cost of state-of-the-art autopilot capability in the IFR terminal area. Of the five levels tested, the heading select mode made the largest relative difference in decreasing workload and simplifying the approach task. It was also found that the largest number of blunders was detected with the most highly automated mode. The data also showed that, regardless of the autopilot mode, performance during an IFR approach was highly dependent on the type of approach being flown. These results indicate that automation can be useful when making IFR approaches in a high workload environment, but also that some disturbing trends are associated with some of the higher levels of automation found in state-of-the-art autopilots

    Analysis of general aviation single-pilot IFR incident data obtained from the NASA aviation safety reporting system

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    Data obtained from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) data base were used to determine problems in general aviation single pilot IFR operations. The data examined consisted of incident reports involving flight safety in the National Aviation System. Only those incidents involving general aviation fixed wing aircraft flying under IFR in instrument meteorological conditions were analyzed. The data were cataloged into one of five major problem areas: (1) controller judgement and response problems; (2) pilot judgement and response problems; (3) air traffic control intrafacility and interfacility conflicts; (4) ATC and pilot communications problems; and (5) IFR-VFR conflicts. The significance of the related problems, and the various underlying elements associated with each are discussed. Previous ASRS reports covering several areas of analysis are reviewed

    Pilot response in combined control tasks

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    Pilot response in multitask simulatio

    General aviation single pilot IFR autopilot study

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    Five levels of autopilot complexity were flown in a single engine instrument flight rules (IFR) simulation for several different IFR terminal operations. A comparison was made of the five levels of complexity ranging from no-autopilot to a fully coupled lateral and vertical guidance mode to determine the relative benefits vs. complexity/cost of state of the art autopilot capability in the IFR terminal area. Of the five levels tested, the heading select mode made the largest relative difference in decreasing workload and simplifying the approach task. It was also found that the largest number of blunders was detected with the most highly automated mode. The data also showed that, regardless of the autopilot mode, performance during an IFR approach was highly dependent on the type of approach being flown. These results indicate that automation can be useful when making IFR approaches in a high workload environment, but also that some disturbing trends are associated with some of the higher levels of automation found in state of the art autopilots

    Semi-classical behavior of P\"oschl-Teller coherent states

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    We present a construction of semi-classical states for P\"oschl-Teller potentials based on a supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The parameters of these "coherent" states are points in the classical phase space of these systems. They minimize a special uncertainty relation. Like standard coherent states they resolve the identity with a uniform measure. They permit to establish the correspondence (quantization) between classical and quantum quantities. Finally, their time evolution is localized on the classical phase space trajectory.Comment: 7 pages, 2 figures, 1 animatio

    A compilation and analysis of typical approach and landing data for a simulator study of an externally blown flap STOL aircraft

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    A piloted simulation study has been made of typical landing approaches with an externally blown flap STOL aircraft to ascertain a realistic dispersion of parameter values at both the flare window and touchdown. The study was performed on a fixed-base simulator using standard cockpit instrumentation. Six levels of stability and control augmentation were tested during a total of 60 approaches (10 at each level). A detached supplement containing computer printouts of the flare-window and touchdown conditions for all 60 runs has been prepared

    Proposed study to determine potential flight applications and human factors design guidelines of voice recognition/synthesis systems

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    An effort to evaluate the human factors aspects and potential of voice recognition/synthesis techniques and the application of present and near-future (5 years) voice recognition/synthesis systems as a pilot/aircraft cockpit interface capability in an operational environment is discussed. The analysis will emphasize applications for single pilot instrument flight rules operations but will also include applications for other categories of aircraft with various levels of complexity

    White Dwarfs In Ngc6397 And M4: Constraints On The Physics Of Crystallization

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    We explore the physics of crystallization in the dense Coulomb plasma of the deep interiors of white dwarf stars using the color-magnitude diagram and luminosity function constructed from Hubble Space Telescope photometry of the globular cluster M 4 and compare it with our results for proper motion cleaned Hubble Space Telescope photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6397. We demonstrate that the data are consistent with a binary mixture of carbon and oxygen crystallizing at a value of Gamma higher than the theoretical value for a One Component Plasma (OCP). We show that this result is in line with the latest Molecular Dynamics simulations for binary mixtures of C/O. We discuss implications for future work.Astronom
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