9 research outputs found

    DISC1: Structure, Function, and Therapeutic Potential for Major Mental Illness

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    Finishing the euchromatic sequence of the human genome

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    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process. The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers ‚ąľ99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of ‚ąľ1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number, birth and death. Notably, the human enome seems to encode only 20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead

    Face masks influence emotion judgments of facial expressions: a drift‚Äďdiffusion model

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    Abstract Face masks slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2, but it has been unknown how masks might reshape social interaction. One important possibility is that masks may influence how individuals communicate emotion through facial expressions. Here, we clarify to what extent‚ÄĒand how‚ÄĒmasks influence facial emotion communication, through drift‚Äďdiffusion modeling (DDM). Over two independent pre-registered studies, conducted three and 6 months into the COVID-19 pandemic, online participants judged expressions of 6 emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise) with the lower or upper face ‚Äúmasked‚ÄĚ or unmasked. Participants in Study 1 (N‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ228) correctly identified expressions above chance with lower face masks. However, they were less likely‚ÄĒand slower‚ÄĒto correctly identify these expressions relative to without masks, and they accumulated evidence for emotion more slowly‚ÄĒvia decreased drift rate in DDM. This pattern replicated and intensified 3 months later in Study 2 (N‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ264). These findings highlight how effectively individuals still communicate with masks, but also explain why they can experience difficulties communicating when masked. By revealing evidence accumulation as the underlying mechanism, this work suggests that time-sensitive situations may risk miscommunication with masks. This research could inform critical interventions to promote continued mask wearing as needed

    Face masks influence emotion judgments of facial expressions: A drift-diffusion model

    No full text
    Face masks slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2, but it has been unknown how masks might reshape social interaction. One important possibility is that masks may influence how individuals communicate emotion through facial expressions. Here, we clarify to what extent‚ÄĒand how‚ÄĒ masks influence facial emotion communication, through drift-diffusion modeling (DDM). Over two independent pre-registered studies, conducted three and six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, online participants judged expressions of 6 emotions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, surprise) with the lower or upper face ‚Äúmasked‚ÄĚ or unmasked. Participants in Study 1 (N = 228) correctly identified expressions above chance with lower face masks. However, they were less likely‚ÄĒand slower‚ÄĒto correctly identify these expressions relative to without masks, and they accumulated evidence for emotion more slowly‚ÄĒvia decreased drift rate in DDM. This pattern replicated and intensified three months later in Study 2 (N = 264). These data could inform critical interventions to promote continued mask wearing by addressing concerns about how masks impact communication

    Plant Based Diets : The Influence of Popularity, Nutritional and Price Perceptions on Choice of Milk Beverages

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    The objective of this study is to help our client better understand UBC students‚Äô preference and perception on milk beverages and suggest ways to encourage undergraduates to consider trying other plant-based milk beverages. We conducted an online questionnaire to investigated UBC students‚Äô current preference on milk beverage and whether they will be open to trying other milk alternatives after either a popularity, nutritional or price intervention. We hypothesize that by providing information on popularity, nutritional and price of milk beverages as in intervention, people will be more opened to trying other milk products. However, after a chi-square data analysis from the data, we concluded that our interventions were not effective in influencing participants‚Äô choice of milk beverages. Disclaimer: ‚ÄúUBC SEEDS provides students with the opportunity to share the findings of their studies, as well as their opinions, conclusions and recommendations with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report and is not an official document of UBC. Furthermore readers should bear in mind that these reports may not reflect the current status of activities at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about the current status of the subject matter of a project/report.‚ÄĚArts, Faculty ofPsychiatry, Department ofUnreviewedUndergraduat

    TUT0201 Course Replication of Diener, E., Ng, W., Harter, J., & Arora, R. (2010). - University of Toronto W19

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    This is a statistics course-based replication of Diener et al (2010) under the guidance of Professor Molly Metz at the University of Toronto. 20 student groups will each be responsible for sampling, data analysis, and reporting

    Timepix3 as solid-state time-projection chamber in particle and nuclear physics

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    Timepix3 devices are hybrid pixel detectors developed within the Medipix3 collaboration at CERN providing a simultaneous measurement of energy (ToT) and time of arrival (ToA) in each of its 256√ó256 pixels (pixel pitch: 55 ¬Ķm). The timestamp resolution below 2 ns allows a measurement of charge carrier drift times, so that particle trajectories can be reconstructed in 3D on a microscopic level (z-resolution: 30-60 ¬Ķm). The 3D trajectory reconstruction methodology developed elsewhere is validated against simulated data providing ground truth information of the incident angles. The detector response functions and the achievable track angular resolutions are determined. For the first time, data taken with Timepix3 in the MoEDAL experiment are presented. After extracting singly charged minimum ionizing particle (MIP) tracks from the mixed radiation field using characteristic track features, their impact angles are evaluated. The directionality of the MIP radiation field is shown in elevation angle (őł) versus azimuthal angle (Ōē) maps, "unfolded" using the simulated detector responses to an omnidirectional radiation field.ISSN:1824-803