35 research outputs found

    Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

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    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the Universal Slopes method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio, number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two

    A high temperature fatigue and structures testing facility

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    As man strives for higher levels of sophistication in air and space transportation, awareness of the need for accurate life and material behavior predictions for advanced propulsion system components is heightened. Such sophistication will require complex operating conditions and advanced materials to meet goals in performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. To accomplish these goals will require that components be designed using a high percentage of the material's ultimate capabilities. This serves only to complicate matters dealing with life and material behavior predictions. An essential component of material behavior model development is the underlying experimentation which must occur to identify phenomena. To support experimentation, the NASA Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory has been expanded significantly. Several new materials testing systems have been added, as well as an extensive computer system. The intent of this paper is to present an overview of the laboratory, and to discuss specific aspects of the test systems. A limited discussion of computer capabilities will also be presented

    An evaluation of strain measuring devices for ceramic composites

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    A series of tensile tests was conducted on SiC/reaction bonded silicon nitrides (RBSN) composites using different methods of strain measurement. The tests were used to find the optimum strain sensing device for use with continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites in ambient and high temperature environments. Bonded resistance gages were found to offer excellent performance for room temperature tests. The clip-on gage offers the same performance, but less time is required for mounting it to the specimen. Low contact force extensometers track the strain with acceptable results at high specimen temperatures. Silicon carbide rods with knife edges are preferred. The edges must be kept sharp. The strain measuring devices should be mounted on the flat side of the specimen. This is in contrast to mounting on the rough thickness side

    Considerations concerning fatigue life of metal matrix composites

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    Since metal matrix composites (MMC) are composed from two very distinct materials each having their own physical and mechanical properties, it is feasible that the fatigue resistance depends on the strength of the weaker constituent. Based on this assumption, isothermal fatigue lives of several MMC's were analyzed utilizing a fatigue life diagram approach. For each MMC, the fatigue life diagram was quantified using the mechanical properties of its constituents. The fatigue life regions controlled by fiber fracture and matrix were also quantitatively defined

    Stirling engine: Available tools for long-life assessment

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    A review is presented for the durability approaches applicable to long-time life assessment of Stirling engine hot-section components. The crucial elements are experimental techniques for generating long-time materials property data (both monotonic and cyclic flow and failure properties); analytic representations of slow strain rate material stress-strain response characteristics (monotonic and cyclic constitutive relations) at high temperatures and low stresses and strains; analytic creep-fatigue-environmental interaction life prediction methods applicable to long lifetimes at high temperatures and small stresses and strains; and experimental verification of life predictions. Long-lifetime design criteria for materials of interest are woefully lacking. Designing against failures due to creep, creep-rupture, fatigue, environmental attack, and creep-fatigue-environmental interaction will require considerable extrapolation. Viscoplastic constitutive models and time-temperature parameters will have to be calibrated for the hot-section materials of interest. Analysis combined with limited verification testing in a short-time regime will be required to build confidence in long-lifetime durability models

    Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb in air and argon environments

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    A series of tension-tension, load-controlled thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on a titanium aluminide composite in both laboratory air and a flowing argon environment. Results from these tests show that the environment plays an increasingly important role as applied stress levels are decreased. Differences in damage mechanisms between the two environments were observed which corresponds to observed variations in TMF lives

    Fatigue behavior and life prediction of a SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite under isothermal conditions

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    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) and Intermetallic Matrix Composites (IMC) were identified as potential material candidates for advanced aerospace applications. They are especially attractive for high temperature applications which require a low density material that maintains its structural integrity at elevated temperatures. High temperature fatigue resistance plays an important role in determining the structural integrity of the material. This study attempts to examine the relevance of test techniques, failure criterion, and life prediction as they pertain to an IMC material, specifically, unidirectional SiC fiber reinforced titanium aluminide. A series of strain and load controlled fatigue tests were conducted on unidirectional SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite at 425 and 815 C. Several damage mechanism regimes were identified by using a strain-based representation of the data, Talreja's fatigue life diagram concept. Results of these tests were then used to address issues of test control modes, definition of failure, and testing techniques. Finally, a strain-based life prediction method was proposed for an IMC under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures

    Thermomechanical testing techniques for high-temparature composites: TMF behavior of SiC(SCS-6)/Ti-15-3

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    Thermomechanical testing techniques recently developed for monolithic structural alloys were successfully extended to continuous fiber reinforced composite materials in plate form. The success of this adaptation was verified on a model metal matrix composite (MMC) material, namely SiC(SCS-6)/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn. Effects of heating system type and specimen preparation are also addressed. Cyclic lives determined under full thermo-mechanical conditions were shown to be significantly reduced from those obtained under comparable isothermal and in-phase bi-thermal conditions. Fractography and metallography from specimens subjected to isothermal, out-of-phase and in-phase conditions reveal distinct differences in damage-failure modes. Isothermal metallography revealed extensive matrix cracking associated with fiber damage throughout the entire cross-section of the specimen. Out-of-phase metallography revealed extensive matrix damage associated with minimal (if any) fiber cracking. However, the damage was located exclusively at surface and near-surface locations. In-phase conditions produced extensive fiber cracking throughout the entire cross-section, associated with minimal (if any) matrix damage

    Report of the Horizontal Launch Study

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    A study of horizontal launch concepts has been conducted. This study, jointly sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was tasked to estimate the economic and technical viability of horizontal launch approaches. The study team identified the key parameters and critical technologies which determine mission viability and reported on the state of the art of critical technologies, along with objectives for technology development

    Titanium Aluminide Applications in the High Speed Civil Transport

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    It is projected that within the next two decades, overseas air travel will increase to over 600,000 passengers per day. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is a second-generation supersonic commercial aircraft proposed to meet this demand. The expected fleet of 500 to 1500 aircraft is required to meet EPA environmental goals; the HSCT propulsion system requires advanced technologies to reduce exhaust and noise pollution. A part of the resultant strategy for noise attenuation is the use of an extremely large exhaust nozzle. In the nozzle, several critical components are fabricated from titanium aluminide: the divergent nap uses wrought gamma; the nozzle sidewall is a hybrid fabrication of both wrought gamma face sheet and cast gamma substructure. This paper describes the HSCT program and the use of titanium aluminide for its components
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