2,533 research outputs found

    Laboratory Quality Control Report: Why is it Important?

    Get PDF
    The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) maintains a fee-based water quality lab that is certified through the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). The AWRC Water Quality Lab analyzes water samples for a variety of constituents, using standard methods for the analysis of water samples (APHA 2012). Whether you have one or several water samples tested, the lab generates a report of values for each parameter that you have analyzed, which is provided to the client. Included with every water quality report is a Lab Quality Control (QC) report for each of the parameters analyzed within the package. The Lab QC report provides important information about the performance of the methods used to test your water sample(s)

    Stream Water Quality to Support HUC 12 Prioritization in the Lake Wister Watershed, Oklahoma: August 2017 through May 2019

    Get PDF
    Nonpoint source pollution associated with human land use (agriculture and urbanization) is one of the leading causes of impairment to waterways in the United States (EPA 2000). The primary pollutants associated with agricultural and urban land use are sediment and nutrients which enter nearby streams during rain events and are then carried downstream. These sediments and nutrients may result in water quality issues in the downstream water bodies like increased algal growth or decreased water clarity (e.g. Smith et al., 1999). Best management practices (BMPs) are often used to mitigate the effects of nonpoint source pollution in the watershed. Practices such as riparian buffers installed along the edge of field and conservation tillage (e.g., no-till, spring-till, and cover crops) slow overland flow, reducing erosion and nutrient loss from the landscape (Schoumans et al. 2014). Installing BMPs throughout the entire watershed would have the greatest effect at reducing nonpoint source pollution; however, this is not socially or economically feasible. Targeting critical source areas or priority watersheds for BMPs installation, optimizes the benefits while reducing the overall (Sharpley et al. 2000)

    Watershed Investigative Support to the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority: Stream Water Quality to Support HUC 12 Prioritization in the Lake Wister Watershed, Oklahoma

    Get PDF
    Nonpoint source pollution associated with human land use (agriculture and urbanization) is one of the leading causes of impairment to waterways in the United States (EPA, 2000). The primary pollutants associated with agricultural and urban land use are sediment and nutrients which enter nearby streams during rain events and are then carried downstream. These sediments and nutrients may result in water quality issues in the downstream water bodies like increased algal growth or decreased water clarity (e.g. Smith et al., 1999)

    Water Quality Reporting Limits, Method Detection Limits, and Censored Values: What Does It All Mean?

    Get PDF
    The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) maintains a fee-based water-quality lab that is certified by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ). The AWRC Water Quality Lab analyzes water samples for a variety of constituents, using standard methods for the analysis of water samples (APHA 2012). The lab generates a report on the analysis, which is provided to clientele, and reports the concentrations or values as measured. Often times the concentrations or values might be very small, even zero as reported by the lab – what does this mean? How should we use this information? This document is intended to help our clientele understand the analytical report, the values, and how one might interpret information near the lower analytical limits. Every client wants the analysis of their water sample(s) to be accurate and precise, but what do we really mean when we say those two words? These words are often used synonymously or thought of as being the same, but the two words mean two different things. Both are equally important when analyzing water samples for constituent concentrations

    How to Collect your Water Sample and Interpret the Results for the Poultry Analytical Package

    Get PDF
    Rapidly growing birds may consume up to twice as much water as feed (Scantling and Watkins 2013), which means a plentiful supply of clean water is crucial for poultry health and productivity. To determine the quality of your poultry’s water resources, periodic sampling and analysis is needed. Analyzing water supplies can also be a crucial tool in identifying existing or potential challenges. The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) in cooperation with the UA Cooperative Extension Service offers several analytical packages to assess the quality of your water resources. This document is intended to provide guidance to poultry producers on collecting water samples for analysis and understanding the “Poultry Water Report Form” provided by the AWRC’s Water Quality Laboratory (Lab). The information contained within this fact sheet should be used as general guidance, and the reader is encouraged to seek advice from Extension specialists regarding the interpretation of individual reports and water testing results that may be of concern

    Effects of Landscape Disturbances on Autotrophic Processes Within Arkansas Ozark Streams

    Get PDF
    Land-use change is one of the most widespread human impacts and can influence abiotic and biotic processes within surrounding streams. For example, streams in agricultural and urban watersheds receive greater light and nutrient inputs that can promote increased algal growth and primary production. Natural gas (NG) infrastructure development, a recent land use change in many regions, may also stimulate forested stream primary production, by reducing forest cover and increasing sediments and nutrient transport. I sampled streams across a NG activity gradient for algal biomass and gross primary production (GPP) to assess potential effects of this emerging land-use type. Algal biomass and GPP were positively associated with NG activity during winter, suggesting algal stimulation by nutrient enrichment of streams impacted by NG activity. To examine the nutrient limitation status of my study streams, I experimentally manipulated nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in diffusing substrata and found that while P was not limiting, N-limitation was negatively related to NG activity (R2= 0.57; p= 0.03). Best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented to help reduce sediment inputs, associated with NG activity on streams, though little has been done to assess their effectiveness. I used a before-after control-impact design to test the effectiveness of implemented BMPs at reducing impacts to autotrophic processes in headwater streams and the South Fork Little Red River. There were no differences between reference and impacted sites before and after the disturbance occurred for the autotrophic processes measured. These results suggest that BMPs were effective at mitigating effects of low levels of NG activity. However, NG activity in the study watersheds was less than in surrounding areas, potentially contributing to the absence of change. In my final study, I examined how human land-use affects recovery of algal communities and metabolic processes to flood disturbances. Biomass and metabolism recovered more rapidly in urban and agricultural streams than forested streams likely due to increased nutrient availability. These findings highlight the defining role of increased nutrient availability as one main driver of effects of human land-use change on autotrophic processes in stream ecosystems

    Managing Lake Fertility within the Guidelines of a Nutrient Management Plan and based on Algal Nutrient Limitation

    Get PDF
    The specific objectives were to first, monitor nutrients, algal biomass, and water clarity in lakes Cove, Spring, and Wedington. Second, evaluate whether algal growth in each of the lakes was limited by N, P, or both N and P. This research was conducted to help USFS better manage lake fertilization to maximize algal growth and improve the fisheries within these lakes

    How to Sample: Collecting Water Samples is so Easy, Anyone can do it!

    Get PDF
    The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) runs a water quality lab that anyone can use to have their water sample tested. The AWRC Lab is certified for the analysis of water samples, but the quality (and meaningfulness) of the data generated by the Lab is also dependent on you – the client. This fact sheet provides you some general guidance on how to properly collect your water sample

    How to Collect your Water Sample & Interpret the Results for the Domestic Analytical Packages

    Get PDF
    Whether you rely on a municipal water source or a private well for your drinking water needs, having access to clean drinking water is important to everyone. The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) in cooperation with the UA Cooperative Extension Service, both of which are part of the U of A System’s Division of Agriculture, offers several analytical packages to assess the quality of your water resources. This document is intended to provide guidance on collecting water samples for analysis and understanding the Domestic Water Report Form”provided by the AWRC’s Water Quality Laboratory (Lab). The AWRC Water Quality Lab is a state certified lab through the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality; however, the certification does not cover drinking water. Therefore, the information contained within this fact sheet and your Domestic Water Report Form should be used as general guidance, and the reader is encouraged to seek advice from state Extension water quality specialist regarding the interpretation of individual reports and water testing results that may be of concern

    How to Collect your Water Sample and Interpret the Results for the Livestock Analytical Package

    Get PDF
    A plentiful supply of clean water is crucial for livestock health and productivity. To determine the quality of your livestock’s water resources, periodic sampling and analysis is needed. The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) in cooperation with the UA Cooperative Extension Service offers several analytical packages to assess the quality of your water resources. This document is intended to provide guidance to livestock owners on collecting water samples for analysis and understanding the results on your report provided by the AWRC’s Water Quality Laboratory (Lab). The information contained within this fact sheet should be used as general guidance, and the reader is encouraged to seek advice from Extension specialists regarding the interpretation of individual reports and water testing results that may be of concern
    • …
    corecore