152 research outputs found

    Bayesian analysis of multiple direct detection experiments

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    Bayesian methods offer a coherent and efficient framework for implementing uncertainties into induction problems. In this article, we review how this approach applies to the analysis of dark matter direct detection experiments. In particular we discuss the exclusion limit of XENON100 and the debated hints of detection under the hypothesis of a WIMP signal. Within parameter inference, marginalizing consistently over uncertainties to extract robust posterior probability distributions, we find that the claimed tension between XENON100 and the other experiments can be partially alleviated in isospin violating scenario, while elastic scattering model appears to be compatible with the frequentist statistical approach. We then move to model comparison, for which Bayesian methods are particularly well suited. Firstly, we investigate the annual modulation seen in CoGeNT data, finding that there is weak evidence for a modulation. Modulation models due to other physics compare unfavorably with the WIMP models, paying the price for their excessive complexity. Secondly, we confront several coherent scattering models to determine the current best physical scenario compatible with the experimental hints. We find that exothermic and inelastic dark matter are moderatly disfavored against the elastic scenario, while the isospin violating model has a similar evidence. Lastly the Bayes' factor gives inconclusive evidence for an incompatibility between the data sets of XENON100 and the hints of detection. The same question assessed with goodness of fit would indicate a 2 sigma discrepancy. This suggests that more data are therefore needed to settle this question.Comment: 29 pages, 8 figures; invited review for the special issue of the journal Physics of the Dark Universe; matches the published versio

    Chasing a consistent picture for dark matter direct searches

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    In this paper we assess the present status of dark matter direct searches by means of Bayesian statistics. We consider three particle physics models for spin-independent dark matter interaction with nuclei: elastic, inelastic and isospin violating scattering. We shortly present the state of the art for the three models, marginalising over experimental systematics and astrophysical uncertainties. Whatever the scenario is, XENON100 appears to challenge the detection region of DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST. The first aim of this study is to rigorously quantify the significance of the inconsistency between XENON100 data and the combined set of detection (DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST together), performing two statistical tests based on the Bayesian evidence. We show that XENON100 and the combined set are inconsistent at least at 2 sigma level in all scenarios but inelastic scattering, for which the disagreement drops to 1 sigma level. Secondly we consider only the combined set and hunt the best particle physics model that accounts for the events, using Bayesian model comparison. The outcome between elastic and isospin violating scattering is inconclusive, with the odds 2:1, while inelastic scattering is disfavoured with the odds of 1:32 because of CoGeNT data. Our results are robust under reasonable prior assumptions. We conclude that the simple elastic scattering remains the best model to explain the detection regions, since the data do not support extra free parameters. Present direct searches therefore are not able to constrain the particle physics interaction of the dark matter. The outcome of consistency tests implies that either a better understanding of astrophysical and experimental uncertainties is needed, either the dark matter theoretical model is at odds with the data.Comment: 18 pages, 8 figures and 7 tables; minor revisions following referee report. Accepted for publication in Phys.Rev.

    Triplet seesaw model: from inflation to asymmetric dark matter and leptogenesis

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    The nature of dark matter (DM) particles and the mechanism that provides their measured relic abundance are currently unknown. Likewise, the nature of the inflaton is unknown as well. We investigate the triplet seesaw model in an unified picture. At high energy scale, we consider Higgs inflation driven by an admixture of standard model and triplet Higgs fields, both coupled non-minimally to gravity. At intermediate and low energies we investigate vector like fermion doublet DM candidates with a charge asymmetry in the dark sector, which is generated by the same mechanism that provides the baryon asymmetry, namely baryogenesis-via-leptogenesis induced by the decay of scalar triplets. At the same time the model gives rise to neutrino masses in the ballpark of oscillation experiments via type-II seesaw. We then apply Bayesian statistics to infer the model parameters giving rise to the observed baryon asymmetry and DM density, compatibly with inflationary and DM direct detection constraints, updated with the CRESST-II excess, the new XENON100 data release and KIMS exclusion limit.Comment: Contribution to the Proceedings of PASCOS2012 conference; 6 pages and 5 figure

    Multi-lepton signatures at LHC from sneutrino dark matter

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    We investigate multi-lepton LHC signals arising from an extension at the grand unification scale of the standard minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) involving right-handed neutrino superfields. In this framework neutrinos have Dirac masses and the mixed sneutrinos are the lightest supersymmetric particles and hence the dark matter candidates. We analyze the model parameter space in which the sneutrino is a good dark matter particle and has a direct detection cross-section compatible with the LUX bound. Studying the supersymmetric mass spectrum of this region, we find several signatures relevant for LHC, which are distinct from the predictions of the MSSM with neutralino dark matter. For instance two opposite sign and different flavor leptons, three uncorrelated leptons and long-lived staus are the most representative. Simulating both the signal and expected background, we find that the multi-lepton signatures and the long-lived stau are in the reach of the future run of LHC with a luminosity of 100/fb. We point out that if one of these signatures is detected, it might be an indication of sneutrino dark matter.Comment: 34 pages, 14 figures and 6 tables; this version matches the published on

    Constraints on Light WIMP candidates from the Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission

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    Motivated by the measurements reported by direct detection experiments, most notably DAMA, CDMS-II, CoGeNT and Xenon10/100, we study further the constraints that might be set on some light dark matter candidates, M_DM ~ few GeV, using the Fermi-LAT data on the isotropic gamma-ray diffuse emission. In particular, we consider a Dirac fermion singlet interacting through a new Z' gauge boson, and a scalar singlet S interacting through the Higgs portal. Both candidates are WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), i.e. they have an annihilation cross-section in the pbarn range. Also they may both have a spin-independent elastic cross section on nucleons in the range required by direct detection experiments. Although being generic WIMP candidates, because they have different interactions with Standard Model particles, their phenomenology regarding the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is quite distinct. In the case of the scalar singlet, the one-to-one correspondence between its annihilation cross-section and its spin-independent elastic scattering cross-section permits to express the constraints from the Fermi-LAT data in the direct detection exclusion plot, sigma_n^0--M_DM. Depending on the astrophysics, we argue that it is possible to exclude the singlet scalar dark matter candidate at 95 % CL. The constraints on the Dirac singlet interacting through a Z' are comparatively weaker.Comment: 18 pages, 13 figures, replaced to match with the published versio

    Review on Dark Matter Tools

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    Whilst the need for dark matter was established almost a century ago, only its gravitational interaction has been confirmed so far, allowing for plethora of models for dark matter. The Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) category has received by far the biggest attention, however despite the enormous experimental efforts, these particles remain elusive. The attention of the community has hence moved on to investigate the dark matter landscape over a much larger number of models with varying degrees of resemblances and differences in their predictions. This calls for the need to organise the various facets of dark matter models and their signatures, in order to maximise the experimental sensitivity and to select the models which are compatible with existing data. In this paper, I provide a short review of the most widespread public codes capable of computing dark matter observables. In particular, I discuss what is the status of each numerical tool in terms of: (i) capturing the WIMP phenomenology and (ii) accounting for new trend dark sector models that might be weakly coupled to ordinary matter and/or be strongly self-interacting. This short review has the aim of guiding the user towards selecting the best suited public code to confront his/her model with the largest variety of theoretical predictions and experimental data in order to determine the parameter space consistent with observations for his/her favourite dark matter model.Comment: 9 pages + references; matches the published version (only few references added) into "Tools for High Energy Physics and Cosmology" (TOOLS2020), 2-6 Nov. 2020, IP2I Lyon, Franc

    Co-genesis of Matter and Dark Matter with Vector-like Fourth Generation Leptons

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    We propose a simple extension of the standard model by adding a fourth generation vector-like lepton doublet and show that if the fourth neutrino is a massive pseudo-Dirac fermion with mass in the few hundred GeV range and mass splitting of about 100 keV, its lighter component can be a viable inelastic dark matter candidate. Its relic abundance is produced by the CP violating out-of-equilibrium decay of the type-II seesaw scalar triplet, which also gives rise to the required baryon asymmetry of the Universe via type-II leptogenesis, thus providing a simultaneous explanation of dark matter and baryon abundance observed today. Moreover, the induced vacuum expectation value of the same scalar triplet is responsible for the sub-eV Majorana masses to the three active neutrinos. A stable fourth generation of neutrinos is elusive at collider, however might be detected by current dark matter direct search experiments.Comment: 7 pages, 5 figures and small corrections to match the version accepted for publication in Physics Letters
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