5 research outputs found

    Room Temperature Metalation of 2H-TPP Monolayer on Iron and Nickel Surfaces by Picking up Substrate Metal Atoms

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    Here, it is demonstrated, using high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, that 2<i>H</i>-tetraphenyl porphyrins metalate at room temperature by incorporating a surface metal atom when a (sub)monolayer is deposited on 3d magnetic substrates, such as Fe(110) and Ni(111). The calculations demonstrate that the redox metalation reaction would be exothermic when occurring on a Ni(111) substrate with an energy gain of 0.89 eV upon embedding a Ni adatom in the macrocycle. This is a novel way to form, <i>via</i> chemical modification and supramolecular engineering, 3d-metal–organic networks on magnetic substrates with an intimate bond between the macrocycle molecular metal ion and the substrate atoms. The achievement of a complete metalation by Fe and Ni can be regarded as a test case for successful preparation of spintronic devices by means of molecular-based magnets and inorganic magnetic substrates

    Lattice Mismatch Drives Spatial Modulation of Corannulene Tilt on Ag(111)

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    We investigated the adsorption of corannulene (C<sub>20</sub>H<sub>10</sub>) on the Ag(111) surface by experimental and simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoemission (XPS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Structural optimizations of the adsorbed molecules were performed by density functional theory (DFT) and the core excited spectra evaluated within the transition-potential approach. Corannulene is physisorbed in a bowl-up orientation displaying a very high mobility (diffusing) and dynamics (tilting and spinning) at room temperature. At the monolayer saturation coverage, molecules order into a close-compact phase with an average intermolecular spacing of ∼10.5 ± 0.3 Å. The lattice mismatch drives a long wavelength structural modulation of the molecular rows, which, however, could not be identified with a specific superlattice periodicity. DFT calculations indicate that the structural and spectroscopic properties are intermediate between those predicted for the limiting cases of an on-hexagon geometry (with a 3-fold, ∼8.6 Å unit mesh) and an on-pentagon geometry (with a 4-fold, ∼11.5 Å unit mesh). We suggest that molecules smoothly change their equilibrium configuration along the observed long wavelength modulation of the molecular rows by varying their tilt and azimuth in between the geometric constraints calculated for molecules in the 3-fold and 4-fold phases

    Lattice Mismatch Drives Spatial Modulation of Corannulene Tilt on Ag(111)

    No full text
    We investigated the adsorption of corannulene (C<sub>20</sub>H<sub>10</sub>) on the Ag(111) surface by experimental and simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoemission (XPS), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Structural optimizations of the adsorbed molecules were performed by density functional theory (DFT) and the core excited spectra evaluated within the transition-potential approach. Corannulene is physisorbed in a bowl-up orientation displaying a very high mobility (diffusing) and dynamics (tilting and spinning) at room temperature. At the monolayer saturation coverage, molecules order into a close-compact phase with an average intermolecular spacing of ∼10.5 ± 0.3 Å. The lattice mismatch drives a long wavelength structural modulation of the molecular rows, which, however, could not be identified with a specific superlattice periodicity. DFT calculations indicate that the structural and spectroscopic properties are intermediate between those predicted for the limiting cases of an on-hexagon geometry (with a 3-fold, ∼8.6 Å unit mesh) and an on-pentagon geometry (with a 4-fold, ∼11.5 Å unit mesh). We suggest that molecules smoothly change their equilibrium configuration along the observed long wavelength modulation of the molecular rows by varying their tilt and azimuth in between the geometric constraints calculated for molecules in the 3-fold and 4-fold phases

    Chemical Bonds and Charge-Transfer Dynamics of a Dye–Hierarchical-TiO<sub>2</sub> Hybrid Interface

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    The adsorption of Zn-tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) on nanoporous hierarchically organized anatase TiO<sub>2</sub> structures and the properties of the corresponding hybrid interface were studied by synchrotron radiation experiments. The molecular structure, electronic properties, and bonding with nanostructured TiO<sub>2</sub> surfaces were analyzed by photoemission (XPS and UPS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The charge transfer at the interface was investigated by means of valence band resonant photoemission experiments (ResPES) at the C K-edge. We show that the charge-transfer dynamics between the photoexcited ZnTPP and TiO<sub>2</sub> is strongly influenced by the presence of defects on the TiO<sub>2</sub> surface. On a stoichiometric anatase nanostructure, ZnTPP bonding occurs primarily via carbon atoms belonging to the molecular phenyl rings, and this creates a preferential channel for the charge transfer. This phenomenon is reduced in the case of defective TiO<sub>2</sub> surface, where ZnTPP interacts mainly through the molecule macrocycle. Our results represent a surface science study of the dye molecule behavior on a nanoporous TiO<sub>2</sub> photoanode relevant to dye-sensitized or hybrid solar cell applications, and they show the importance of the surface oxidation state for the charge-transfer process

    Revealing the Adsorption Mechanisms of Nitroxides on Ultrapure, Metallicity-Sorted Carbon Nanotubes

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    Carbon nanotubes are a natural choice as gas sensor components given their high surface to volume ratio, electronic properties, and capability to mediate chemical reactions. However, a realistic assessment of the interaction of the tube wall and the adsorption processes during gas phase reactions has always been elusive. Making use of ultraclean single-walled carbon nanotubes, we have followed the adsorption kinetics of NO<sub>2</sub> and found a physisorption mechanism. Additionally, the adsorption reaction directly depends on the metallic character of the samples. Franck–Condon satellites, hitherto undetected in nanotube–NO<sub><i>x</i></sub> systems, were resolved in the N 1<i>s</i> X-ray absorption signal, revealing a weak chemisorption, which is intrinsically related to NO dimer molecules. This has allowed us to identify that an additional signal observed in the higher binding energy region of the core level C 1<i>s</i> photoemission signal is due to the CO species of ketene groups formed as reaction byproducts . This has been supported by density functional theory calculations. These results pave the way toward the optimization of nanotube-based sensors with tailored sensitivity and selectivity to different species at room temperature
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