260 research outputs found

    The Relationship between Income Inequality, Poverty, and Globalization

    Get PDF
    globalization, income inequality, poverty, indices, principal component

    Measurement of a Multidimentional Index of Globalization and its Impact on Income Inequality

    Get PDF
    globalization, income inequality, indices, principal component

    A Generalized Knowledge Production Function

    Get PDF
    This paper presents a generalized production model based on the knowledge production function. The model allows the relationships between corporate competitiveness strategy, innovation, efficiency, productivity growth and outsourcing to be investigated at the firm level in a number of steps. First, in reviewing recent developments of researches on the above relationships, provide discussion on data and the methods of measuring these variables. Second, depending on availability of information, different measures are transferred into single multidimensional index of corporate strategy using principal component analysis. Third, stochastic frontier production function and factor productivity analysis are used to estimate the efficiency and factor productivity growth at the firm level. Fourth, the causal relationships between the five variables of interest are established and modelled. Finally, given the direction of causality, the implications of the findings for estimation of the relationship are discussed. For the empirical analysis we use Swedish firm-level innovation survey data covering both manufacturing and service sectors.Competition; innovation; outsourcing; productivity; efficiency; causality; firm

    AN ECONOMETRIC MODEL OF EMPLOYMENT IN ZIMBABWE¡¯S MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

    Get PDF
    This paper is concerned with the estimation of employment relationship and employment efficiency under production risk using a panel of Zimbabwe¡¯s manufacturing industries. A flexible labour demand function is used consisting of two parts: the traditional labour demand function and labour demand variance function. Labour demand is a function of wages, output, quasi-fixed inputs and time variables. The variance function is a function of the determinants of labour demand and a number of production and policy characteristic variables. Estimation of industry and time-varying employment efficiency is also considered. The empirical results show that the average employment efficiency is 92%.Labour demand, Variance, Efficiency, Manufacturing, Industries, Zimbabwe

    The link between firm-level innovation and aggregate productivity growth: a cross-country examination

    Get PDF
    This paper investigates whether failure in innovation at the firm level can account for cross-country heterogeneity in manufacturing productivity growth. There is no strong evidence in the literature on the existence of such link. Our work, however, differs in a number of ways from much of the previous cross-country comparisons on the relationship between innovation and productivity using firm-level data. First, a broader definition of innovation input is used in which research and development is one of several sources of innovation. Second, a quantitative innovation output measure is used in the analysis. Third, the analysis is based on larger and more representative samples of firms including small firms. Finally, an econometric framework based on the knowledge production function accounting for both selectivity and simultaneity bias is employed. The results from Nordic countries show that given difficulties in pooling the data, it is important to specify country-specific models accounting for country-specific effects and differences in the countries national innovation systems. --community innovation,cross-country comparisons,manufacturing,productivity

    Migration, Openness and the Global Preconditions of 'Smart Development'

    Get PDF
    In this article, we present a first empirical reflection on 'smart development', its measurement, possible 'drivers' and 'bottlenecks'. We first provide cross-national data on how much ecological footprint is used in the nations of the world system to 'deliver' a given amount of democracy, economic growth, gender equality, human development, research and development, and social cohesion. To this end, we first developed UNDP-type performance indicators on these six main dimensions of development and on their combined performance. We then show the non-linear regression trade-offs between ecological footprints per capita on these six dimensions of development and their combined performance index. The residuals from these regressions are our new measures of smart development: a country experiences smart development, if it achieves a maximum of development with a minimum of ecological footprint. We then look at the cross-national drivers and bottlenecks of this 'smart development' and compare their predictive power using stepwise regression procedures. Apart from important variables and indicators, derived from sociological dependency and world systems theories, we also test the predictive power of several other predictors as well. Our estimates underline the enormous importance of the transfer of resources from the center to the periphery, brought about by migration, with huge statistical observed positive effects of received worker remittances on smart human development, Happy Life Years, smart gender justice, smart R&D, and both formulations of the smart development index.index numbers and aggregation, environment and development, environment and trade, smart development, sustainability, environmental accounts and accounting, environmental equity, population growth, international migration, remittances

    Alternative Composite Lisbon Development Strategy Indices: A Comparison of EU, USA, Japan and Korea

    Get PDF
    This study addresses the measurement of two composite Lisbon strategy indices that quantifies the level and patterns of development for ranking countries. The first index is nonparametric labelled as Lisbon strategy index (LSI). It is composed of six components: general economics, employment, innovation research, economic reform, social cohesion and environment, each generated from a number of Lisbon indicators. LSI by reducing the complexity of the set of indicators, it makes the ranking procedures quite simple. The second and parametric index is based on principal component analysis. Despite the difference in the ranking by the two indices, it is shown that the United States outperformed most EU-member states. Our investigations also show evidence of significant dynamic changes taking place, as the countries of the Union struggle to achieve the Lisbon goals. The necessity of a real reform agenda in several old and new members and candidate countries emerges from our analysis. We briefly refer to two important European phenomena emerging from our data analysis and discuss the possible lessons learned from the Korean development strategyEconomic development, composite index, Lisbon Agenda

    Technical Change and Total Factor Productivity Growth for Chinese Provinces: A Panel Data Analysis

    Get PDF
    We present in this paper the panel econometrics estimation approach of measuring the technical change and total factor productivity (TFP) growth of 30 Chinese provinces during the period of 1993 to 2003. The random effects model with heteroscedastic variances has been used for the estimation of the translog production functions. Two alternative formulations of technical change measured by the single time trend and the general index approach are used. Based on the measures of technical change, estimates of TFP growth could be obtained and its determinants were examined using regression analysis. The parametric TFP growth measure is compared with the non-parametric Solow residual. TFP has recorded positive growth for all provinces during the sample period. Regional breakdown shows that the eastern and central regions have higher average TFP growth when compared with the western region. Foreign direct investment (FDI) and information and communication technology (ICT) investment are found to be significant factors contributing to the TFP difference. While these two factors are found to have significant influence on TFP, their influence on production is relatively small compared to traditional inputs of production.technical change; TFP growth; provinces; China; ICT; FDI; infrastructure
    corecore