28 research outputs found

    Focus Groups in Hospitality Research Why are they not used in Jordan?

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    The purpose of this study is to identify the reasons for the lack of focus groups in Jordan by conducting a focus group with twenty four Academics from Jordanian Universities. Focus groups are commonly used for academic purposes and taught at colleges and universities. The outcome of focus groups for marketing, especially in the tourism industry, is a beneficial learning tool. Focus groups, however, are rarely used for a number of reasons. This research tool is foreign to university students, and unless they study abroad, they are not exposed to a wide range of research and education tools. There are barriers that exist with focus groups. These barriers include: government and educational funding, cultural limitations, personal expectations, teaching materials and resources. Following this research, the recommendations are to have focus groups implemented in Jordanian school systems and to conduct focus group training sessions, encourage students to use them as a research tool and explain the link between focus groups and the hospitality industry. By limiting curriculums in Jordanian education systems, students will not have the proper knowledge or skills once they graduate to compete with markets outside of Jordan. Recommendations are discussed based on the author’s research findings

    Regularization by nonlocal conditions of the incorrect problems for differential‐operator equations of the first order

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    „Regularization by nonlocal conditions of the incorrect problems for differential‐operator equations of the first order" Mathematical Modelling Analysis, 2(1), p. 160-166 First Published Online: 14 Oct 201

    The Impact of Total Quality Management Implementation on Employees’ Service Recovery Performance in Five-Star Hotels in Jordan

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    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of total quality management (TQM) implementations on employees’ service recovery performance in five-star hotels in Jordan. TQM implementations and service recovery performance have received significant attention in previous research. However, the impact of TQM on service recovery performance has remained unexplored research area. A 67-item questionnaire, measuring TQM implementations and service recovery, was distributed to 400 employees in 12 five-star hotels in Jordan with a 63.5 response rate. Principle Component Analysis was utilized to determine the factor structure for both TQM and service recovery and Regression Analysis to determine the impact of TQM implementations on service recovery performance. The result revealed that the TQM implementations in five-star hotels in Jordan was  implemented effectively and thus, have a positive impact on employees’ service recovery performance. This result is attributed to be unique and this is due to the fact that previous studies have focused on manufacturing sector not on hotel sector in measuring either TQM implementations or service recovery performance. This paper suggests replicating the study in additional settings to determine if similar results will be obtained outside five-star-hotels in Jordan. Many of the previous studies on TQM and service recovery performance have been conducted in the context of western economies and very little research has been done in the Middle East in general and Jordan in particular. As such, there is a need to examine, from the employees’ perspective, the levels of implementing TQM that are being encouraged in the hospitality industry and it is effect on service recovery performance among employees towards their both employers and customers. The present paper contributes to filling the gap in the literature by measuring the TQM implementations and service recovery as a whole in a new context. Keywords: Total Quality Management (TQM), Service Failure, Service Recovery Performance, Hotels, Jordan

    The impact of internal service quality on job satisfaction in the hotel industry

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    Service quality is a key factor for success in any hotel. Many researchers have conducted studies on service quality, but only a few studies have been conducted on internal service quality (ISQ) in general, and in the hotel industry in particular. Since there is no general agreement among researchers on the measurement of ISQ, many studies have used SERVQUAL instrument to measure the employees’ perceptions of ISQ. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of ISQ on employee’s job satisfaction in five-star hotels in Jordan. The current study was carried out by measuring the data gathered through a seven-point Likert scale. The quantitative survey method was applied, and therefore the SERVQUAL instrument was used to measure ISQ, and the Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS) was used to measure job satisfaction. Data obtained from a sample of 238 respondents drawn from 14 five-star hotels in Jordan were analysed with the SPSS software based on descriptive statistics. The study’s findings indicated that the ISQ of five-star hotels in Jordan has a significantly positive influence on an employee’s job satisfaction. These findings support the hypothesis that there is a positive relationship between ISQ in the hotel industry and industry employees’ job satisfaction.Keywords: hotels, internal service quality, job satisfactio

    Understanding the Impact of Empowerment on Employees Innovation Performance: Evidence from the Jordanian Hotel Industry

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    This research aimed to measure the impact of empowerment on employees’ innovation performance at five-star hotels in Jordan. The research applied the two main perspectives of empowerment (i.e., structural empowerment and psychological empowerment). A 35-item questionnaire, measuring empowerment and innovation performance, was distributed to 400 employees working in 12 five-star hotels in Jordan with a 63.5 response rate. Principle component analysis was utilized to determine the factor structure for both empowerment and innovation performance and regression analysis to determine the impact of empowerment on innovation performance. The results reveal that both forms of empowerment have a positive and significant impact on innovation performance. However, structural empowerment has a stronger impact on innovation performance than psychological empowerment. The results also show that integrating the two perspectives of empowerment together has clearly a higher level of impact on innovation performance than structural and psychological empowerment does when both taken separately. This research provides new insights into the existing literature, implications and directions for future research. Keywords: employee empowerment, structural / psychological empowerment, innovation performance, hotels, and Jordan DOI: 10.7176/JTHS/44-02 Publication date:October 31st 201

    The Etiology of Viral Lower Respiratory Tract Infections at a Tertiary Hospital in Jordan over Five Years

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    Background Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is the most common condition treated in primary care and is considered the third leading cause of death worldwide. The objective of our study is to determine the etiological agents that cause viral LRTI in Jordan, aiming to help physicians to choose the appropriate treatment strategy. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study on patients who were admitted with the diagnosis of LRTI between January, 2011 and January, 2016. We used Fast-track Diagnostics (FTD)¼ Respiratory 21 Kit (Fast-track Diagnostics, Luxembourg) real-time PCR to determine the viral etiology of LRTI, and we investigated pandemic H1N1 2009 swine flu virus using rapid test PCR. Results This study involved 495 patients with a mean age of 57.79 ± 18.43 years. The causative agents were identified in 157 patients out of 495 patients (31.7%). FTD real-time PCR was done for 170 patients, and the test was positive for seasonal Influenza A virus in 7.1% of patients, influenza B in 4.1%, RSV in 4.7%, metapneumovirus in 4.1%, adenovirus in 4.1%, corona 229E/NL63 in 4.1%, parainfluenza virus in 7.6%, and rhinovirus in 3.5%. The percent of cases who were positive for pandemic H1N1 2009 swine flu virus was 4.2%. The rate of ICU admission was 16.8%, and the mortality rate of LRTI was as low as 3.64%. Conclusions Viral LRTI is more common in winter season in Jordan, especially in January. Remarkably, Influenza A and Parainfluenza viruses were the main viral causative agents for LRTI in our study

    Antimicrobial resistance among migrants in Europe: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    BACKGROUND: Rates of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are rising globally and there is concern that increased migration is contributing to the burden of antibiotic resistance in Europe. However, the effect of migration on the burden of AMR in Europe has not yet been comprehensively examined. Therefore, we did a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify and synthesise data for AMR carriage or infection in migrants to Europe to examine differences in patterns of AMR across migrant groups and in different settings. METHODS: For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and Scopus with no language restrictions from Jan 1, 2000, to Jan 18, 2017, for primary data from observational studies reporting antibacterial resistance in common bacterial pathogens among migrants to 21 European Union-15 and European Economic Area countries. To be eligible for inclusion, studies had to report data on carriage or infection with laboratory-confirmed antibiotic-resistant organisms in migrant populations. We extracted data from eligible studies and assessed quality using piloted, standardised forms. We did not examine drug resistance in tuberculosis and excluded articles solely reporting on this parameter. We also excluded articles in which migrant status was determined by ethnicity, country of birth of participants' parents, or was not defined, and articles in which data were not disaggregated by migrant status. Outcomes were carriage of or infection with antibiotic-resistant organisms. We used random-effects models to calculate the pooled prevalence of each outcome. The study protocol is registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42016043681. FINDINGS: We identified 2274 articles, of which 23 observational studies reporting on antibiotic resistance in 2319 migrants were included. The pooled prevalence of any AMR carriage or AMR infection in migrants was 25·4% (95% CI 19·1-31·8; I2 =98%), including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (7·8%, 4·8-10·7; I2 =92%) and antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (27·2%, 17·6-36·8; I2 =94%). The pooled prevalence of any AMR carriage or infection was higher in refugees and asylum seekers (33·0%, 18·3-47·6; I2 =98%) than in other migrant groups (6·6%, 1·8-11·3; I2 =92%). The pooled prevalence of antibiotic-resistant organisms was slightly higher in high-migrant community settings (33·1%, 11·1-55·1; I2 =96%) than in migrants in hospitals (24·3%, 16·1-32·6; I2 =98%). We did not find evidence of high rates of transmission of AMR from migrant to host populations. INTERPRETATION: Migrants are exposed to conditions favouring the emergence of drug resistance during transit and in host countries in Europe. Increased antibiotic resistance among refugees and asylum seekers and in high-migrant community settings (such as refugee camps and detention facilities) highlights the need for improved living conditions, access to health care, and initiatives to facilitate detection of and appropriate high-quality treatment for antibiotic-resistant infections during transit and in host countries. Protocols for the prevention and control of infection and for antibiotic surveillance need to be integrated in all aspects of health care, which should be accessible for all migrant groups, and should target determinants of AMR before, during, and after migration. FUNDING: UK National Institute for Health Research Imperial Biomedical Research Centre, Imperial College Healthcare Charity, the Wellcome Trust, and UK National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare-associated Infections and Antimictobial Resistance at Imperial College London

    Surgical site infection after gastrointestinal surgery in high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries: a prospective, international, multicentre cohort study