15,214 research outputs found

    Organic Centre Wales Factsheet 24: The Organic Farming Scheme (OFS)

    Get PDF
    This factsheet describes the Organic Farming Scheme, an agri-environment scheme that offers payments to farmers in Wales to help them convert to organic farming with the aim of benefiting the environment. It is a key part of the Organic Action Plan for Wales, one of the aims of which is to increase the area of agricultural land in Wales under organic management by 10 – 15% by 2010. The OFS is funded by the EU and the Welsh Assembly Government as part of the 1999-2006 Rural Development Plan (RDP) for Wales, and will be subject to revision for the new 2007-2013 RDP. Issues covered include, how payments are structured, who is eligible, how to apply and how to get advice on organic conversion

    Organic Centre Wales Technical Note 4: Biology and management of slugs

    Get PDF
    Slugs are the most common and widespread pest affecting all farmers and growers. There are 29 species of slugs in the UK. The most destructive are from the Deroceras, Arion and Malix groups. Very few crops are unaffected as slugs are polyphagus and feed throughout the year whenever conditions are cool/warm and damp. With FYM & green manures, soil organic matter levels are increased which favours slugs. Snails tend to be less important, but can cause problems in gardens and on cane fruits. This technical note discusses natural enemies of slugs, nature of damage, life history and control measures, and lists sources of further information

    Organic Centre Wales Factsheet 6: Suppliers of organic seed, feed and fertilizers

    Get PDF
    This factsheet lists suppliers of organic seed, feed and fertilizer for areas throughout Wales. The list is not exhaustive and additions are welcomed

    Organic Centre Wales Technical Note 5: Biology and management of wireworms

    Get PDF
    Wireworms are the larvae of a group of beetles commonly known as click beetles. After falling on their backs they right themselves by flicking themselves into the air and produce a “clicking” sound. There are about 60 species of click beetle in the UK, but the majority of attacks are caused by three Agriotes species (lineatus, obscurus and spuator). This technical notes lists natural enemies of wireworms, nature of damage, life history and control measures, and a list of sources of further information

    Organic Centre Wales Factsheet 11: Benchmarking with Organic Centre Wales

    Get PDF
    This factsheet explains what is meant by benchmarking, a method of assessing the performance of businesses, by comparing them against a ‘benchmark’ or industry standard. It also explains the advantages of getting involved

    Organic Centre Wales Factsheet 22: Feeding to organic standards

    Get PDF
    This factsheet states the general principles of feeding to organic standards. Issues surrounding the use of conventional feedstuffs, supplements and the feeding of young animals are also covere

    Soil Fertility: A summary of research conducted under the German Federal Programme for Organic Agriculture and other forms of Sustainable Agriculture

    Get PDF
    Since 2002, the federal research programme for organic agriculture has supported research projects on soil fertility. Research projects at the beginning studied specific subject areas such as comparison of various mulch materials, nutrient mobilisation (especially phosphorus), humus balance and soil erosion. This addressed gaps especially in methods in organic practice, where data acquired from conventional agriculture are not applicable. From 2008, the research on soil fertility significantly increased and there was a special focus on interdisciplinary systems approaches. The joint research project on the management of soil fertility in organic farming, for example, examined a number of factors that interact in this field, such as tillage and soil compaction, fertilisers, green manures and cover crops, weed and disease pressure, crop species and yield levels, energy consumption and the use of machinery, but also cost-benefit analyses of promoting soil fertility and recommendations for farmers. Other projects addressing the need to increase soil fertility investigated the influence of agronomic management measures on soil quality, and of various aspects of reduced tillage; these projects continue the idea of the systems approach. In 2011 a status quo analysis of long-term field experiments in German-speaking countries was conducted, which included comparisons of systems employed to study the long-term impact of management measures on soil fertility, and to identify further research needs. Important results from individual projects on soil fertility are presented below. Based on new data, recommendations are given on the use of different mulching materials and effects on soil moisture and nutrient content. Also results relevant for practitioners were derived from the revision of the method for estimating soil erosion, and concrete suggestions for new methods were made. Similar to the case of the method for estimating humus balance, this method could also be adapted for the conditions of organic farming in Germany. From on-going projects (started since 2008) important first results have been obtained. For example, the status quo analysis of long-term field experiments produced new findings on the long-term effects of different management systems, and new research gaps were identified. Further results from the BÖLN research on soil fertility are regularly published at www.bundesprogramm-oekolandbau.d
    corecore