695 research outputs found

    Gravitino dark matter from gluino late decay in split supersymmetry

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    In split-supersymmetry (split-SUSY), gluino is a metastable particle and thus can freeze out in the early universe. The late decay of such a long-life gluino into the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) may provide much of the cosmic dark matter content. In this work, assuming the LSP is gravitino produced from the late decay of the metastable gluino, we examine the WMAP dark matter constraints on the gluino mass. We find that to provide the full abundance of dark matter, the gluino must be heavier than about 14 TeV and thus not accessible at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC).Comment: discussions added (version in PRD

    Dynamical Dark Matter: II. An Explicit Model

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    In a recent paper (arXiv:1106.4546), we introduced "dynamical dark matter," a new framework for dark-matter physics, and outlined its underlying theoretical principles and phenomenological possibilities. Unlike most traditional approaches to the dark-matter problem which hypothesize the existence of one or more stable dark-matter particles, our dynamical dark-matter framework is characterized by the fact that the requirement of stability is replaced by a delicate balancing between cosmological abundances and lifetimes across a vast ensemble of individual dark-matter components. This setup therefore collectively produces a time-varying cosmological dark-matter abundance, and the different dark-matter components can interact and decay throughout the current epoch. While the goal of our previous paper was to introduce the broad theoretical aspects of this framework, the purpose of the current paper is to provide an explicit model of dynamical dark matter and demonstrate that this model satisfies all collider, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints. The results of this paper therefore constitute an "existence proof" of the phenomenological viability of our overall dynamical dark-matter framework, and demonstrate that dynamical dark matter is indeed a viable alternative to the traditional paradigm of dark-matter physics. Dynamical dark matter must therefore be considered alongside other approaches to the dark-matter problem, particularly in scenarios involving large extra dimensions or string theory in which there exist large numbers of particles which are neutral under Standard-Model symmetries.Comment: 45 pages, LaTeX, 10 figures. Replaced to match published versio

    Redshift distribution of {\bf Ly-α\alpha} lines and metal systems

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    The observed redshift distribution of Ly-α\alpha lines and metal systems is examined in order to discriminate and to trace the evolution of structure elements observed in the galaxy distribution, at small redshifts, and to test the theoretical description of structure evolution. We show that the expected evolution of filamentary component of structure describes quite well the redshift distribution of metal systems and stronger Ly-α\alpha lines with log(NHI)\log(N_{HI})\geq14, at zz\leq 3. The redshift distribution of weaker Ly-α\alpha lines can be attributed to the population of poorer structure elements (Zel'dovich pancakes), which were formed at high redshifts from the invisible DM and non luminous baryonic matter, and at lower redshifts they mainly merged and dispersed.Comment: 13 pages, 5 figures, accepted in MNRA

    Cross-correlation of the CMB and foregrounds phases derived from the WMAP data

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    We present circular and linear cross-correlation tests and the "friend-of-friend" analysis for phases of the Internal Linear Combination Map (ILC) and the WMAP foregrounds for all K--W frequency bands at the range of multipoles 100\ell\le100. We compare also Tegmark, de Oliveira-Costa and Hamilton (2003) and Naselsky et al. (2003) cleaned maps with corresponding foregrounds. We have found significant deviations from the expected Poissonian statistics for all the cleaned maps and foregrounds. Our analysis shows that, for a low multipole range of the cleaned maps, power spectra contains some of the foregrounds residuals mainly from the W band.Comment: 11 pages, 10 figures. Submitted to MNRA

    Wavelength limits on isobaricity of perturbations in a thermally unstable radiatively cooling medium

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    Nonlinear evolution of one-dimensional planar perturbations in an optically thin radiatively cooling medium in the long-wavelength limit is studied numerically. The accepted cooling function generates in thermal equilibrium a bistable equation of state P(ρ)P(\rho). The unperturbed state is taken close to the upper (low-density) unstable state with infinite compressibility (dP/dρ=0dP/d\rho= 0). The evolution is shown to proceed in three different stages. At first stage, pressure and density set in the equilibrium equation of state, and velocity profile steepens gradually as in case of pressure-free flows. At second stage, those regions of the flow where anomalous pressure (i.e. with negative compressibility) holds, create velocity profile more sharp than in pressure-free case, which in turn results in formation of a very narrow (short-wavelength) region where gas separates the equilibrium equation of state and pressure equilibrium sets in rapidly. On this stage, variation in pressure between narrow dense region and extended environment does not exceed more than 0.01 of the unperturbed value. On third stage, gas in the short-wavelength region reaches the second (high-density) stable state, and pressure balance establishes through the flow with pressure equal to the one in the unperturbed state. In external (long-wavelength) regions, gas forms slow isobaric inflow toward the short-wavelength layer. The duration of these stages decreases when the ratio of the acoustic time to the radiative cooling time increases. Limits in which nonlinear evolution of thermally unstable long-wavelength perturbations develops in isobaric regime are obtained.Comment: 21 pages with 7 figures, Revtex, accepted in Physics of Plasma

    Dark Radiation Emerging After Big Bang Nucleosynthesis?

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    We show how recent data from observations of the cosmic microwave background may suggest the presence of additional radiation density which appeared after big bang nucleosynthesis. We propose a general scheme by which this radiation could be produced from the decay of non-relativistic matter, we place constraints on the properties of such matter, and we give specific examples of scenarios in which this general scheme may be realized.Comment: v3: 5 pages, 1 figure. References added, typos corrected, notation changed throughout. v2: 5 pages, 1 figure. Reformatted, references added, acknowledgments updated, effect of radiation on CMB clarified. v1: 11 pages, 1 figur

    Statistical characteristics of observed Ly-α\alpha forest and the shape of linear power spectrum

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    Properties of \sim 6 000 Ly-α\alpha absorbers observed in 19 high resolution spectra of QSOs are investigated using the model of formation and evolution of DM structure elements based on the Zel'dovich theory. This model asserts that absorbers are formed in the course of both linear and nonlinear adiabatic or shock compression of dark matter (DM) and gaseous matter. It allows us to link the column density and overdensity of DM and gaseous components with the observed column density of neutral hydrogen, redshifts and Doppler parameters of absorbers and demonstrates that at high redshifts we observe a self similar period of structure evolution with the Gaussian initial perturbations. We show that the colder absorbers are associated with rapidly expanded regions of a galactic scale which represent large amplitude negative density perturbations. We extend and improve the method of measuring the power spectrum of initial perturbations proposed in Demia\'nski & Doroshkevich (2003b). Our method links the observed separations and the DM column density of absorbers with the correlation function of the initial velocity field. We recover the cold dark matter (CDM) like power spectrum at scales 10> D > 0.15Mpc/h with a precision of ~15%. However at scales 3150h1\sim 3 - 150 h^{-1}kpc the measured and CDM--like spectra are different. This result suggests a possible complex inflation with generation of excess power at small scales.Comment: 21 pages, 7 figures, MNRAS submitte

    Bulk Viscosity, Decaying Dark Matter, and the Cosmic Acceleration

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    We discuss a cosmology in which cold dark-matter particles decay into relativistic particles. We argue that such decays could lead naturally to a bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid. For decay lifetimes comparable to the present hubble age, this bulk viscosity enters the cosmic energy equation as an effective negative pressure. We investigate whether this negative pressure is of sufficient magnitude to account fo the observed cosmic acceleration. We show that a single decaying species in a flat, dark-matter dominated cosmology without a cosmological constant cannot reproduce the observed magnitude-redshift relation from Type Ia supernovae. However, a delayed bulk viscosity, possibly due to a cascade of decaying particles may be able to account for a significant fraction of the apparent cosmic acceleration. Possible candidate nonrelativistic particles for this scenario include sterile neutrinos or gauge-mediated decaying supersymmetric particles.Comment: 7 pages, 4 figure
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