131 research outputs found

    Managing work-life tensions in the neo-liberal UK

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    Work-life integration is an increasingly hot topic in the media, social research, governments and in people’s everyday lives. This volume offers a new type of lens for understanding work-family reconciliation by studying how work-family dynamics are shaped, squeezed and developed between consistent or competing logics in different societies in Europe and the US. The three institutions of "state", "family" and "working life", and their under-explored primary logics of "regulation", "morality" and "economic competitiveness" are examined theoretically as well as empirically throughout the chapters, thus contributing to an understanding of the contemporary challenges within the field of work-family research that combines structure and culture. Particular attention is given to the ways in which the institutions are confronted with various moral norms of good parenthood or motherhood and ideals for family life. Likewise, the logic of policy regulation and gendered family moralities are challenged by the economic logic of working life, based on competition in favour of the most productive workers and organizations

    Sesta lezione Total Rewards

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    Thriving not just surviving: A review of research on teacher resilience

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    Retaining teachers in the early stages of the profession is a major issue of concern in many countries. Teacher resilience is a relatively recent area of investigation which provides a way of understanding what enables teachers to persist in the face of challenges and offers a complementary perspective to studies of stress, burnout and attrition. We have known for many years that teaching can be stressful, particularly for new teachers, but little appears to have changed. This paper reviews recent empirical studies related to the resilience of early career teachers. Resilience is shown to be the outcome of a dynamic relationship between individual risk and protective factors. Individual attributes such as altruistic motives and high self-efficacy are key individual protective factors. Contextual challenges or risk factors and contextual supports or protective factors can come from sources such as school administration, colleagues, and pupils. Challenges for the future are to refine conceptualisations of teacher resilience and to develop and examine interventions in multiple contexts. There are many opportunities for those who prepare, employ and work with prospective and new teachers to reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors and so enable new teachers to thrive, not just survive

    I Have To Be Everything Voices of International Working Mothers: Negotiating Work-Life Balance in the United States

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    Studies of work-life balance and intercultural adaptation have addressed the effect of work-life conflict for working adults and the psychological and sociocultural adaptation of immigrants. However, rarely does this research explore how working adults, especially women, develop solutions to those work-life tensions. Previous literature is typically silent about how international women struggle with acclimating to a different national culture while also working or going to school and parenting children. Thus, this study aims to explore the unique challenges international working mothers face as they work and live in the United States and the communicative strategies and solutions they adopt in coping with the tensions. I conducted 17 in-depth interviews with women from 10 nationalities, and the interviews resulted in over 230 single-spaced pages of transcribed data. Using David Bojes (2001) antenarrative analysis method, I analyze the data in two phases. In the first phase, I tell individual stories in the format of vignettes, a polyphonic approach. In the second phase, I summarize the similar challenges faced and solutions adopted by some women, and I list the differences at micro, meso, and macro levels. Findings reveal that international working mothers encounter unique challenges in their studies, in the workplace, in building relationships, in childcare, and in managing intimate relationships. These challenges arise from language barriers, new work and academic environments, lack of extended family support, different cultural norms, visa limitations, and gender ideology. Solutions, while limited, arise from their family members\u27 support, their advisors\u27 encouragement, and their own resilient personalities. The micro-meso-macro framework helps to highlight the contextual influences of meso and macro forces on the women\u27s daily lives and struggles. Findings confirm and extend existing literature on work-life conflict and intercultural adaptation. Findings provide theoretical implications on work-life conflict (Clark, 2000) and adaptation theories (Kim, 2005), as well as provide practical implications on government visa policies and university practices. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed

    Remembering Two Economic Giants

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    Work Rich, Time Poor? Time-Use of Women and Men in Ireland

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    Are we running out of time? This paper uses data from a recently completed time-use survey in Ireland to consider whether the recent employment growth has led to high workloads, time-pressure and a lack of free time. We examine levels of total committed time, that is, time spent on employment/education, unpaid work (caring and household work) and travel, across different groups in the population. We find high workloads among the employed and those caring for young children and adults. High levels of committed time are found to be associated with greater subjective feelings of time-pressure. Our evidence suggests that recent employment growth is likely to have contributed to time poverty and feelings of time-pressure.

    The rhetorical significance of women deminers and female participation in post-conflict operations

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    Across the globe, all female or mix-gender demining teams are working to eradicate landmines and other explosive remnants of war that threaten their communities. However, more generally, women are often absent from the various elements of security and peacekeeping that exists in post-conflict environments. The purpose of this research is to examine the rhetorical significance of women deminers and to analyze wider implications for female participation in post-conflict operations. Using a phenomenological, feminist, and transformative framework, I collected qualitative data from a range of public texts (or “artifacts”) written about women deminers and from online surveys distributed to women demining teams operating abroad. By analyzing both data sets and through their comparison, several themes emerge including the women deminers’ role as wives and mothers, the deminers’ motivations, and information about their occupational choices. Survey respondents were aware of their depictions in popular media and agreed in most part with the way women deminers are described. In many cases, they enthusiastically support continued coverage of their work. While the artifacts portray the women deminers both accurately and positively, the narratives have remained stagnant over the past twenty years of coverage, and the continued focus on women’s participation as a “novelty” implies the presence of women deminers is new and diverting from operational norms. In addition, repetitive stories should be replaced with new research and articles that better connect women deminers with the wider security and peacebuilding sectors. This research is presented as a thesis reflection and two journal articles intended for publication in both scholarly and field journals
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