1,196 research outputs found

    A comparative study of women in the european business world

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    Today, women represent more than 50% of the world's population, yet in no country do they represent nearly half of the corporate managers. According to the United Nation's fourth Conference on Women, women hold only 14% of the top managerial positions in business and only 10% of national legislative seats. Barriers to women's entry into senior management, otherwise known as the "glass ceiling", exist across the globe, and in some areas of the world it is worse than in others. Despite recent progress in most countries, women's advancement in the business arena has been slow. As we are into the 21st century, companies will need to increasingly reflect diversity in their workforce and management can no longer afford to ignore the positive impact women can make.glass ceiling, masculinity/femininity, prejudice, stereotype.

    To Make the Women’s Dignity Blossom

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    Sacrifice lamp women. Female pride, excellence, superiority, women's advancement, women's liberation, etc. are featured in this article. Surviving women are responsible for the success of men and their erection. Women are the cradles of civilization! Women are New chapters! Root-like woman. The woman who makes the world better. Knowledge is beauty for women! Women are equal to men. Man and woman must remain in love. Thanthai Periyar used to call women as “The Women Queen”. Women need to rise to the occasion about themselves. The rise of woman is life to earth. Thiru.vi.ka wishes that “To live world, Live feminine”. Beautiful Women’s, who makes the world blossom. He also mentioned that sovereignty shines in femininity

    Images of women in the A-level literature taught in Tanzanian secondary schools and their implications for development : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Phiilosophy in Development Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand /

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    Traditionally in Tanzania gendered education was carried out by family members and 'elders', with the purpose of equipping young people with the skills and knowledge they would need to play a complete role in their society. Contact with Arab traders led to the adoption of Islam in some communities and the establishment of Koranic schools. With Christianity and the colonial administration; first by Germany and later by Britain, came Western formal education. Women had little access to either of these forms of education however and were not admitted in large numbers to schools until the socialist education policies of the post independence government were put into place. Despite these policies, society's discriminatory attitudes towards women continued to mitigate women's advancement to higher education. This has helped to lead to women's low status in society, the lack of recognition for their contributions to that society and their inability to shape the development of Tanzania on an equal basis with men. Within the education system women and girls suffer many disadvantages which contribute to their lack of academic success. Not least of these is a biased curriculum which is particularly evident in the content of school text books and reading material. Books in the A level literature in English syllabus are all written by men and an analysis of the content of the eight most frequently used books shows the predominance of negative images of women and gender relations which denigrate and devalue women and girls. These negative images, internalised by the female students, prevent them achieving the goals of the syllabus and may contribute to low self esteem and their subsequent low representation in tertiary institutions. Books written by African women writers, which portray more positive images of women and alternative gender relations, are available and would be valuable additions to the syllabus for both male and female students

    Barriers to Work Place Advancement: the Experience of the White Female Work Force

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    Glass Ceiling ReportGlassCeilingBackground17WhiteFemaleWorkForce.pdf: 8903 downloads, before Oct. 1, 2020

    Do institutional cultures serve as impediments for women's advancement towards leadership in South African higher education?

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    The South African higher education sector has undergone various changes over the past 24 years. As far back as 1997, several policies that advocated for equity and redress were introduced. The introduction of these policies, in conjunction with the Employment Equity Act (1998), has not fully addressed the gender imbalances at executive management level in universities. This article delves into cultural and structural constructs in higher educational institutions that impact on women and leadership. It further explores how women in leadership describe the general organisational culture and the manifestations thereof. Critical realism is used as a theoretical lens to analyse the influence and impact of institutional cultures on women in leadership. Women leaders are confronted with the culture of exclusion in the form of male dominance, silencing of women’s voices and male patterns of networking. The article further advocates for extended leadership programmes that are specifically designed for women to change the status-quo. Such programmes can only be effectively implemented within an organisational culture that embraces gender equality and actively pursues recognition of women as equal members of society and other institutions, including institutions of higher learning

    Advancement Experiences of Women in Academic Senior Leadership Positions in STEM Disciplines: A Delphi Analysis

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    This article explores structural support systems that lead to women\u27s advancement and hindrance factors that either catalyze or delay women\u27s career acceleration in higher education, specifically within STEM-related and workforce education disciplines. Through a consensus building approach, a four-round Delphi analysis explored the experiences and perceptions of 17 panelists who currently or formerly served in a senior-ranked position within a higher education setting at five institutions in the Southeast United States. The panel included women who met the eligibility criteria as subject matter experts and held positions as deans in a STEM discipline, principal investigators over federally funded STEM and workforce education programs, and Assistant Vice Presidents. A consensus was reached on nine factors supporting advancement and three factors inhibiting advancement for a total of 12 factors that were considered relevant to the research questions based on the mean score of 3.50. The panelists identified the following factors as relevant for supporting advancement: Support Systems, Personal Attributes, Willingness to Advance, Leadership Skills, Curiosity about New Experiences, Role Models, Opportunities for Leadership Roles, Experiences in Undergraduate and Graduate Studies, and Awareness of Institutional Environments; and those for inhibiting advancement: Conflicting Family Obligations, Lack of Compensation, and Personal Concerns. Support Systems and Personal Attributes were the top-rated factors contributing to advancement, while Conflicting Family Obligations and Lack of Compensation were the leading hindrances

    An Examination of Women\u27s Access to Professional Positions in Hospital Foundations

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    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which professional women in hospital foundations perceive career barriers in their organizations-particularly whether women in mid-level management perceive greater barriers to their career advancement than do women in senior-level management. The researcher also strove to identify the barriers identified in the literature review that women felt were the most significant in their organizations. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 204 women in 113 hospital foundations in California. The subjects were selected from the membership directory of the Association of Philanthropy. The questionnaire was designed to collect three types of information: basic demographic data such as employment position, tenure, and marital status; respondents\u27 perceptions of barriers in the workplace, corresponding to kinds of barriers outlined in the literature review; and additional information elicited from respondents through open-ended questions. The study found that women in hospital foundations perceive some barriers to their career advancement. The most frequently cited barriers to women\u27s advancement were gender bias and the work/family conflict. The study also found that women in mid-level management perceived greater barriers to their career advancement than did women in senior-level management. In particular, women in mid-level management were less satisfied with the challenges in their current position; felt that there were fewer career development opportunities in their organization and fewer career paths available for women who aspired to move into senior-level management; and felt that a lack of mentors and lack of degrees and certificates prevented them from advancing into senior-level positions
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