197,111 research outputs found

    Virtual Reality

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    This analysis paper provides a brief survey of the sector of computer game, application domains, technological demand and presently accessible resolution. It additionally presents the background and motivation of virtual surroundings analysis and identifies typical application domains. It additionally surveys current input/output devices of computer game

    Exploring Oculus Rift: A Historical Analysis of the ‘Virtual Reality’ Paradigm

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    This paper will first provide background information about Virtual Reality in order to better analyze its development throughout history and into the future. Next, this essay begins an in-depth historical analysis of how virtual reality has developed prior to 1970, a pivotal year in Virtual Reality history, followed by an exploration of how this development paradigm shifted between the 1970\u27s and the turn of the century. The historical analysis of virtual reality is concluded by covering the modern period from 2000-present. Finally, this paper examines the layout of the virtual reality field in respect to he history and innovations presented

    Live Sports Virtual Reality Broadcasts: Copyright and Other Protections

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    As virtual reality rapidly progresses, broadcasts are able to increasingly mimic the experience of actually attending a game. As the technology advances and the viewer can freely move about the game and virtual reality can simulate the in-stadium attendance, the virtual reality broadcast nears the point where the broadcast is indistinguishable from the underlying game. Thus, novel copyright protection issues arise regarding the ability to protect the experience through copyright. Although normal broadcasts may be copyrighted, virtual reality broadcasts of live sports could lack protection under the Copyright Act because the elements of originality, authorship, and fixation are harder to satisfy for this type of work. If the elements that formerly protected broadcasts through copyright no longer apply, the virtual reality broadcast of the game will lose copyright protection. The virtual reality broadcaster can receive protection for the work in several ways, such as (1) by broadcaster-made modifications to the transmitted broadcast, (2) through misappropriation claims, or (3) by inserting contract terms. These additional steps maintain the ability of virtual reality broadcasters to disseminate works without fear the work will not be protectable by the law

    The concept of strong and weak virtual reality

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    We approach the virtual reality phenomenon by studying its relationship to set theory, and we investigate the case where this is done using the wellfoundedness property of sets. Our hypothesis is that non-wellfounded sets (hypersets) give rise to a different quality of virtual reality than do familiar wellfounded sets. We initially provide an alternative approach to virtual reality based on Sommerhoff's idea of first and second order self-awareness; both categories of self-awareness are considered as necessary conditions for consciousness in terms of higher cognitive functions. We then introduce a representation of first and second order self-awareness through sets, and assume that these sets, which we call events, originally form a collection of wellfounded sets. Strong virtual reality characterizes virtual reality environments which have the limited capacity to create only events associated with wellfounded sets. In contrast, the more general concept of weak virtual reality characterizes collections of virtual reality mediated events altogether forming an entirety larger than any collection of wellfounded sets. By giving reference to Aczel's hyperset theory we indicate that this definition is not empty, because hypersets encompass wellfounded sets already. Moreover, we argue that weak virtual reality could be realized in human history through continued progress in computer technology. Finally, we reformulate our characterization into a more general framework, and use Baltag's Structural Theory of Sets (STS) to show that within this general hyperset theory Sommerhoff's first and second order self-awareness as well as both concepts of virtual reality admit a consistent mathematical representation.Comment: 17 pages; several edits in v

    Virtual Reality Rhythm Game

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    Virtual reality headsets such as the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift bring robust virtual reality technology in the hands of consumers. However, virtual reality technology is still a very new and unexplored domain with a dearth of compelling software that takes advantage of what virtual reality has to offer. Current rhythm games on the virtual reality platform lack a sense of immersion for the player. These games also require players to remain stationary during gameplay. Our solution is a game where players have to hit musical notes that appear in a trail around them. The trail will move in different directions and players have to move and turn around accordingly in order to hit every note and pass a song

    Virtual Reality Physics Scenarios

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    Many students taking physics early on in their education find that it may be difficult to associate the theory they learn in class with how physics works in real world scenarios. Through various experiments in class, students are able to see examples of physics phenomena, but those experiments are limited by equipment, and do not offer precise data. To combat this, we are creating a virtual reality application for students to use to help learn physics. This report details the requirements the system will meet, as well as the use cases and subsequent activity diagrams for all users. We have also included a conceptual model of our system, as well as an explanation for technologies used, and a test plan and development timeline

    Virtual Reality in Construction

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    Virtual Reality (VR) has a long history of its development, but it was popularized in 2016 with a boom of various VR-rigs (headsets, glasses, controllers). The work of VR is to create the illusion of being present in an environment that is virtual, i.e. computer generated. When transmitting information to various human senses, VR can simulate a stay in a certain environment, room or location, which allows the user to see, hear and interact with the environment through the use of a VR headset, headphones and controllers
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