30,783 research outputs found

    Affective Videogames and Modes of Affective Gaming: Assist Me, Challenge Me, Emote Me

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    In this paper we describe the fundamentals of affective gaming from a physiological point of view, covering some of the origins of the genre, how affective videogames operate and current conceptual and technological capabilities. We ground this overview of the ongoing research by taking an in-depth look at one of our own early biofeedback-based affective games. Based on our analysis of existing videogames and our own experience with affective videogames, we propose a new approach to game design based on several high-level design heuristics: assist me, challenge me and emote me (ACE), a series of gameplay "tweaks" made possible through affective videogames

    Nostalgia videogames as playable game criticism

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    The aim of this paper is to consider the emergence of nostalgia videogames in the context of playable game criticism. Mirroring the development of the nostalgia film in cinema, an increasing number of developers are creating videogames that are evocative of past gaming forms, designs, and styles. The primary focus of this paper is to explore the extent to which these nostalgia videogames could be considered games-on-games: games that offer a critical view on game design and development, framed by the nostalgia and cultural memory of both gamers and game developers. Theories of pastiche and parody as applied to literature, film, and art are used to form a basis for the examination of recent nostalgia videogames, all of which demonstrate a degree of reflection on the videogame medium

    Heritage destruction and videogames:ethical challenges of the representation of cultural heritage

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    Representations of historical or cultural sites in videogames have always been contested by videogames scholarship, arguing that historical games often court controversy. This paper examines the history of the National and University Library in Sarajevo, particularly the destruction of the site and how it has been represented with different meanings across various media. The second part of the paper will analyze the representation of the library (post-reconstruction) in the videogame, Sniper: Ghost Warrior 2’s Act 2 (called ‘Ghost of Sarajevo’), in order to raise issues about the ethical challenges of the representation of a heritage site that has not only been destroyed and reconstructed, but that it is part of a national heritage.The analysis shows that there are important pressures derived from the ways in which videogames represent heritage which has gone through a process of destruction, and how videogames adapt a historical event following formal videogame conventions. The paper concludes by pointing out the benefits of studying cases such as the National and University Library in Sarajevo, as well as new avenues of research regarding the representation of contested cultural sites in videogames

    Videogame art: remixing, reworking and other interventions

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    This chapter explores some of the areas of intersection between videogames and both digital and non-digital art practice. By looking at examples of art practice drawn from videogames, it outlines some of the categories and so provides an overview of this area, placing it within the wider context of contemporary and historical art practice. The chapter explores the tendency for mucyh of this work to have elements of subversion or "détournement" whilst also identifying areas of tension in the appropriation of videogames as material for art practice

    Videogames in the museum:participation, possibility and play in curating meaningful visitor experiences

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    In 2014 Videogames in the Museum [1] engaged with creative practitioners, games designers, curators and museums professionals to debate and explore the challenges of collecting and exhibiting videogames and games design. Discussions around authorship in games and games development, the transformative effect of the gallery on the cultural reception and significance of videogames led to the exploration of participatory modes and playful experiences that might more effectively expose the designer’s intent and enhance the nature of our experience as visitors and players. In proposing a participatory mode for the exhibition of videogames this article suggests an approach to exhibition and event design that attempts to resolve tensions between traditions of passive consumption of curated collections and active participation in meaning making using theoretical models from games analysis and criticism and the conceit of game and museum spaces as analogous rules based environments

    Using Frustration in the Design of Adaptive Videogames

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    In efforts to attract a wider audience, videogames are beginning to incorporate adaptive gameplay mechanics. Unlike the more traditional videogame, adaptive games can cater the gaming experience to the individual user and not just a particular group of users as with the former. Affective videogames, games that respond to the user's emotional state, may hold the key to creating such gameplay mechanics. In this paper we discus how the emotion frustration may be used in the design of adaptive videogames and the ongoing research into its detection and measurement

    Assessing the gaming experience using puppetry

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    In this paper we address the question: What factors of game experience are measured and have to be measured? by proposing a concept called Puppetry to assess the experience while playing videogames. Puppetry was obtained using qualitative methods on the experiences of players. The main characteristic of Puppetry is that it looks at the common elements of videogames that allow the user to build the experience

    Fact, Fiction and Virtual Worlds

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    This paper considers the medium of videogames from a goodmanian standpoint. After some preliminary clarifications and definitions, I examine the ontological status of videogames. Against several existing accounts, I hold that what grounds their identity qua work types is code. The rest of the paper is dedicated to the epistemology of videogaming. Drawing on Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin's works, I suggest that the best model to defend videogame cognitivism appeals to the notion of understanding

    Set theory ontology as an approach to gaming’s composite form

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    This paper will explore the possibilities that mathematical set theory has to offer the scholarly study of videogames. Videogames are highly heterogeneous objects of study, comprising what Linderoth (2015) has called a ‘composite form’: complex arrangements of material, symbolic and computational capacities. This composite is becoming ever-more heterogeneous, ‘recruiting’ increasingly volatile bodies and relations as computing resources are newly distributed throughout both built and natural environments to create locative, alternate and virtual realities that have been used by designers in various ways (Pokemon Go being only one example)
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