1,598 research outputs found

    The Horizon Conquerors: Post-war London through Colonial Eyes.

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    Doris Lessing and V.S. Naipaul both arrived in London a few years after the end of the Second World War. This paper looks at their perceptions of the city as 'colonials', as seen from their fiction and non-fiction writings

    Those Difficult Years

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    Review essay of 'Letters Between and Father and Son' and 'Reading and Writing: A Personal Account' by V.S. Naipaul. The letters of the Naipaul family are compared with the fictional version of events in 'A House for Mr Biswas'

    Alien and Adrift: The Diasporic Consciousness in V.S. Naipaul’s 'Half a Life' and J.M. Coetzee's 'Youth'

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    This article as also published in 'The Regenerative Spirit' ed. Nena Bierbaum, Syd Harrex and Sue Hosking. Adelaide: Lythrum Press, 2003, 118-125.In this paper, I look at some similarities in sensibility of Naipaul and Coetzee, one clearly a diasporic writer and the other less identifiably so, as expressed in these two recent books. I discuss to what extent their differences in literal diasporic status are significant in forming the consciousness of these two writers and their characters, none of whom seem to owe any allegience to a group, a race, a class or a nation

    Lives in halves: A homage to Vidiadhar Naipaul

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    Literary and film scholar Vijay Mishra highlights the similarities of his life with Vidiadhar Naipaul, in paying tribute to writer V.S. Naipaul on being awarded the Nobel Prize in literature for 2001. He suggests that Naipaul has lived his life in halves, as part of the Indian diaspora in Fiji and then in Trinidad which he considers 'half-baked societies', but it is these societies which have provided him his experiences and stories for his books

    Naipaul's Women.

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    V.S. Naipaul's three novels of the 1970s (In a Free State, Guerrillas and A Bend in the River) earned him a reputation as a misogynist. The only sustained critical examination of women in his fiction came in the late seventies and eighties as a reaction to these novels. In this paper I attempt a survey of female characters in Naipaul's fiction across his whole career to establish to what extent this reputation is justified, and whether his harsh treatment of some female characters is matched by equally critical attitudes to male characters. While early conditioning has given Naipaul a traditional view of women’s roles, he cannot be said to show a consistent dislike of women, as his female characters range from the admirable to the repugnant in the same way as his male characters do. Much of the misogyny identified by critics is, on closer examination, attributable to characters rather than Naipaul himself

    The Post-War Novel in Crisis: Three Perspectives

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    Three major novelists of the period following the second world war, Iris Murdoch, Doris Lessing and V.S. Naipaul, have pondered the question of why the post-war novel is unable to achieve the heights of its nineteenth-century predecessors. Each of these three writers has suggested remedies, to which they have aspired with varying degrees of success. And each of them offers, implicitly or explicitly, different reasons for the change. In this essay I will evaluate their arguments and attempt to account for some of the factors which give rise to the consciousness that they are different in some qualitative way from their predecessors. I will also discuss the effect such attitudes may have on their own work

    Revising the Lessons of the Masters

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    Themes of authentication and displacement explored by Henry James in The Portrait of a Lady, a novel later refigured by W. Somerset Maugham in his The Razor’s Edge, have been adapted by V.S. Naipaul in Half a Life. The novels combine to produce an intertextual discourse concerning the post-colonial product of England’s imperialistic appetite that dominated much of the world over the past three centuries. The tangled links between the three books, and particularly Naipaul’s examination of the imbricated layers of self-authentication and imperialism that inform James and Maugham, are the focus of my study

    V.S. Naipaul and a Journey to Trinidad

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    Naipaul’s ‘Fraudulent’ London Novel: Mr Stone and the Knights Companion

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    An examination of V.S. Naipaul's 1963 novel 'Mr Stone and the Knights Companion' which Naipaul later described as 'fraudulent' because of the suppression of his personal point of view. It is compared to other works of the time such as Evelyn Waugh's 'The Loved One', and to Naipaul's later novels 'Half a Life' and 'Magic Seeds', which he has stated were written in some sense as a corrective to the earlier novel

    Area of Enigma: V.S. Naipaul and the East Indian Revival in Trinidad

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