9,015 research outputs found

    Nicholas Martinez: Returning to college to help others like him

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    A speech language pathologist changed Nicholas Martinez\u27s life. Now he\u27s going to do the same for others. When Martinez was a child growing up in Pleasant Point, Maine, a speech language pathologist worked with him to manage his stuttering disorder. The experience inspired him to pursue a master\u27s degree in communication sciences and disorders at the University of Maine

    Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment Internationally

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    Surveying Speech Language Pathologist Around the Worl

    The Effects of Collaboration Versus Traditional Service Delivery on Reading and Listening Comprehension with School-Aged Students

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    This study investigated improvement of reading comprehension and listening comprehension in school-aged students in first through third grades at two different elementary schools. Approximately half of the students at each school received collaborative classroom-based language lessons from the teacher and speech-language pathologist. The other half of the students at each school received regular instruction from the classroom teacher without input from the speech-language pathologist. The speech-language pathologist provided services to the students with speech or language IEP goals in the collaborative classrooms primarily in the classroom during these language lessons. The students who received speech or language services in the control classrooms received services solely through the traditional pull-out service delivery model of intervention. Statistical comparisons between the groups were not significant, even though students receiving services in the collaborative group earned pre-post score differences that were double of those in the pull-out classrooms. Reasons for nonsignificant findings in light of observable differences are discussed

    The Effects of Teacher Involvement in Classroom-Based Intervention for Vocabulary Acquisition and Classroom Communication Skills

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    The present study investigated curricular vocabulary acquisition in children enrolled in grades kindergarten through third. A collaborative classroom-based treatment approach was compared with a classroom-based SLP-teach method of intervention. Children at the collaborative school received a curricular language lesson in the classroom which was team taught by the classroom teacher and speech-language pathologist. The speech-language pathologist and classroom teacher met weekly to determine curricular vocabulary words and materials for the lessons. Children at the SLP-teach school received the same curricular language lessons, however, the classroom teachers were not present during the lessons and collaborative planning did not occur between the speech-language pathologist and classroom teacher. Results indicated that the collaborative classroom-based approach yielded greater gains on an original curricular vocabulary assessment measure than the SLP-teach model of intervention. In examining the individual grade levels at the two schools, greater differences between settings occurred as grade level increased

    Accent, Attitudes, and the Speech-Language Pathologist

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    This research provides an updated survey about the beliefs held by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and SLP students concerning SLPs who have non-standard accents. Of specific interest are participant\u27s thoughts about the minimal level of intelligibility an SLP should have to be effective and thoughts about which clinical populations are affected by accents, as well as information about the comments and actions targeted at SLPs who speak with non-standard accents, and an understanding about how the field has improved over time. An online survey collected quantitative and qualitative data from 52 SLPs and 33 students, primarily from NY and VA. The results indicate a need for research that shows how accent affects clinical populations, so beliefs about minimal intelligibility can be justified. Furthermore, they indicate a positive development in the field in terms of comments targeted at SLPs, though suggestions for future study and improvements in policy are discussed

    Gender Differences in Parents\u27 Assessment of Language Development

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    This study aims to determine if there is a statistically significant difference between genders in the reporting of their child’s communication abilities. Possible variances between men and women are important to consider because parent-based questionnaires are often used to help identify children who are in need and eligible for the services of a speech-language pathologist. Literature surrounding parental stereotypes and the impact of the parent in development, as well as stigma in relation to the need for speech therapy services is explored. A survey based off of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, Third Edition was distributed to parents of children between 24 and 36 months old. While the results of the survey did not show a statistically significant difference between men and women, overarching patterns were found within the data. The most notable trends showed that males consistently reported higher average scores for expressive language-based questions while females reported scores either the same or higher than males for all receptive language-based questions. However, because no statistically difference was found it can be concluded that having only one parent take a questionnaire would not have a large impact on the overall results and subsequent recommendations of a speech-language pathologist

    Collaboration versus Pull-Out Intervention: Effects on Vocabulary Acquisition and Classroom Communication

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    This study investigated improvement in curricular vocabulary in school-aged children grades kindergarten through third at two different elementary schools. One school received collaborative classroom-based language lessons from the teacher and speech-language pathologist (Collaborative School). The other school received regular instruction from the classroom teacher without the input of the speech-language pathologist (Traditional School). The speech-language pathologist provided services to the children with speech or language IEP goals at the Collaborative School primarily in the classroom through these language lessons. The students who received speech or language therapy at the Traditional School received services solely through the pull-out model of intervention. Results revealed that the collaborative classroom-based language lessons fostered greater gains on a curricular vocabulary test than pull-out therapy for children who qualified for speech or language services. Results also indicated that the collaborative classroom-based language lessons were more effective in increasing curricular vocabulary knowledge than regular instruction provided by the teacher alone for subjects who did not qualify for speech or language services. The gains made by the students at the Collaborative School were significantly greater than the improvement demonstrated by subjects at the Traditional School across all four grades and regardless of special services received

    Collaboration versus Pull-Out Intervention: Effects on Vocabulary Acquisition and Classroom Communication

    Get PDF
    This study investigated improvement in curricular vocabulary in school-aged children grades kindergarten through third at two different elementary schools. One school received collaborative classroom-based language lessons from the teacher and speech-language pathologist (Collaborative School). The other school received regular instruction from the classroom teacher without the input of the speech-language pathologist (Traditional School). The speech-language pathologist provided services to the children with speech or language IEP goals at the Collaborative School primarily in the classroom through these language lessons. The students who received speech or language therapy at the Traditional School received services solely through the pull-out model of intervention. Results revealed that the collaborative classroom-based language lessons fostered greater gains on a curricular vocabulary test than pull-out therapy for children who qualified for speech or language services. Results also indicated that the collaborative classroom-based language lessons were more effective in increasing curricular vocabulary knowledge than regular instruction provided by the teacher alone for subjects who did not qualify for speech or language services. The gains made by the students at the Collaborative School were significantly greater than the improvement demonstrated by subjects at the Traditional School across all four grades and regardless of special services received

    Speech-Language Pathologists Collaborating with Head Start to Improve Children’s Early Language and Literacy Skills: Efficacy and Intensity Effects

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    The current study examined the efficacy of a speech-language pathologist–designed and implemented emergent literacy program for Head Start preschoolers and the influence of intensity of intervention on children’s gains. Results indicated that children who participated in the intervention program exhibited greater gains than the control group on oral language, phonological awareness, and alphabet/print knowledge. Children who received a higher dosage of intervention made greater gains on vocabulary and oral language compared to the lower intensity group. Speech-language pathologists may be valuable collaborators in promoting emergent literacy skills in at-risk children
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